Course Descriptions

 

 

A Guide To Ethics for Trust Professionals Curriculum

Ethical behavior is a consideration that applies to every aspect of a professional relationship with a client.

This four-course curriculum addresses today’s ethical concerns by using examples to explain how to apply appropriate behaviors to common situations that exist when working with trust clients. Course exercises provide opportunities to apply knowledge using realistic client scenarios. The series covers:

  • Financial Planning
  • Tax Law and Tax Planning
  • Fiduciary and Trust Activities
  • Investments

Audience: Trust officers and other trust department personnel.

The courses included in A Guide To Ethics for Trust Professionals Curriculum are:

  • A Guide to Ethics in Fiduciary and Trust Activities
  • A Guide to Ethics in Financial Planning
  • A Guide to Ethics in Investments
  • A Guide to Ethics in Tax Law and Tax Planning

A Guide to Ethics in Fiduciary and Trust Activities

Your client doesn’t want to trust his house keys to someone he doesn’t trust; he won’t want to trust his trust assets, either. This Guide to Ethics presents scenarios identifying ethical breaches, and provides the trustee with tools should he discover a breach.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives​

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the duties of the trustee to beneficiaries, including the duty of loyalty and the duty to enforce and defend claims
  • Explain trustee liability in the event of a breach of trust and remedy options
  • Describe tools provided under the Uniform Trust Code (UTC) that trustees can use to manage fiduciary risk
  • Explain the differences between an agency and a fiduciary relationship

Audience: Trust officers and other trust department personnel.

A Guide to Ethics in Financial Planning

Introduces ethical standards as they apply to assisting the client and the advisors in developing an organized and comprehensive financial plan. Provides specific courses of action to prevent conflicts of interest and the potential to affect objectivity, and examines compensation arrangements in financial planning that should be fully disclosed to the client.​

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe guidelines to avoid conflicts of interest
  • Define the role of the financial planner
  • Describe the most common compensation arrangements in financial planning

Audience: Trust officers and other trust department personnel.

A Guide to Ethics in Investments

Explains the importance of trustee duties, custody of client assets, and recognizing the penalties for violating fiduciary duties. Explores avoiding conflicts of interest and covers information on the Uniform Prudent Investor Act (UPIA). Offers guidelines on ethical behavior related to self-dealing, equal treatment of accounts, and soft dollar services.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe laws that pertain to ethical behavior for an investment manager
  • Identify trustee duties relating to investment activities and penalties for violating fiduciary duties
  • Describe common violations of conflict of interest when managing investments
  • Explain prudent investor guidelines, including the prudent man standard, the prudent expert standard, and the Uniform Prudent Investor Act

​Audience: Trust officers and other trust department personnel.

A Guide to Ethics in Tax Law and Tax Planning

Addresses the duties of the fiduciary that is to hold the assets, administer them, and carry out the terms with a duty of loyalty, impartiality, and reasonable care.  It also explores the possible conflicts between investments and the prudent investor rule. This course focuses on the avoidance of the unauthorized practices of law by providing guidelines as to what activities are permitted.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the duties of the fiduciary
  • Describe how the duties of loyalty and impartiality impact the client relationship
  • Explain possible conflicts between investments and the prudent investor rule
  • Identify activities that constitute the unauthorized practice of law

Audience​​​: Trust officers and other trust department personnel.

ABA Bank Service Provider Curriculum

The ABA Bank Service Provider Certificate is designed for individuals employed by companies that provide products and services to the banking industry. Bank service providers need a broad understanding of the banking business, including banking terminology, and can benefit from the same content used by the institutions they will be selling to and servicing.

This curriculum provides participants with an understanding of the role that banks play, the products and services they offer, and the kinds of customers they serve. After completing this curriculum, participants will have a better understanding of the language of bankers, their core products, as well as the regulatory and ethical constraints under which banks operate.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Fundamentals of Consumer Lending
  • Fundamentals of Small Business Banking
  • Understanding Bank Products

The estimated time to complete these 5 courses is approximately 12 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

ABA Bank Teller Certificate Curriculum

The curriculum for the ABA Bank Teller Certificate addresses the expanding role of bank tellers by combining core cash handling courses with enhanced product knowledge and interpersonal skill development. At the center point of the curriculum is Teller Basics, a series of courses that teach critical skills of the teller role such as cashing checks, processing deposits and withdrawals, accepting cash payments, and preparing daily settlements of teller cash and proof transactions.

Understanding that today’s teller has a much broader scope than just handling cash, the certificate curriculum is augmented by courses that contribute to the overall professional development of the teller associates. These range from ethics, workplace conduct and bank product knowledge to being able to provide value-added customer service through a relationship sales approach.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Dealing Effectively with Co-Workers
  • Effective Client Referrals
  • Essentials of Workplace Conduct
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Introduction to Relationship Selling
  • Revitalizing Customer Service
  • Teller Basics

The estimated time to complete these 8 courses is approximately 21 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

ABA Branch Manager Certificate Curriculum

This curriculum prepares individuals to manage a banking office by covering banking essentials, sales management, people management, and business management skills.

Branch managers manage the activities of branch offices and offer deposit and loan products to businesses and individuals. In addition to broad knowledge of banking and banking operations, the responsibilities of Branch Managers require expertise in lending, branch operations, staff supervision and development, sales management and customer service. This certificate addresses these core competencies, providing branch managers with the knowledge and skills they will need to drive their team and bank performance.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Building and Retaining Customer Relationships
  • Calling on Small Business Customers
  • Coaching for Success**
  • Corrective Action**
  • Effective Written Communication
  • Employment Law​**
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers**
  • Fundamentals of Consumer Lending
  • Fundamentals of Small Business Banking
  • Hiring the Best**
  • Introduction to Relationship Selling
  • Leveraging the Benefits of a Diverse Workforce**
  • Managing Change**
  • Managing Employee Performance**
  • Rewards and Recognition**
  • Presentation Skills
  • Sales Coaching in the Bank
  • Servicing and Growing Small Business Relationships
  • Successful Sales Campaigns

The estimated time to complete these 20 courses is approximately 39 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

**These courses are part of the ABA Supervisor Certificate. Students enrolled in the Branch Manager Certificate who have successfully completed the Supervisor Certificate (self-paced or facilitated) will automatically receive credit for the identified courses.​​​

ABA Certificate in Business and Commercial Lending Curriculum

This course focuses on financial statement analysis and commercial lending, will familiarize lenders with both audited and unaudited statements, and fill any gaps in your understanding of credit analysis and underwriting. Pre and post-tests allow seasoned lenders to test out, and more importantly, let the industry know you are “credit trained” and ready to bring in new, qualified business.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Understanding Business Borrowers
    • Business Sectors and Operating Cycles
    • Why Businesses Borrow
    • Business Legal Structures and Life Cycles
    • Introduction to Business Financial Statements
    • How Business Financial Statements are Constructed (Accounting Refresher)
  • Analyzing Business Financial Statements and Tax Returns
    • Income Statement Analysis
    • Balance Sheet Analysis
    • Ratio Analysis
    • Cash Flow Analysis
    • The UCA Model
    • Cash Budgets and Pro Forma Statements
  • Analyzing Personal Financial Statements and Tax Returns
    • Types of Personal Financial Statements
    • Key Ratios and Adjusted Net Worth
    • Personal Tax Returns and Cash Flow
    • Combining Business and Personal Cash Flow into Global Cash Flow
  • Qualitative Analysis and Determining a Credit Risk Rating
    • The Commercial Lending Process and Initial Business Development Calls
    • Credit Investigation and Assessing Industry, Market, and Management Risk
    • Loan Policies and Procedure, Including Credit Risk Ratings
    • Loan Packages and Credit Write-Ups
  • Loan Structuring, Documentation, Pricing and Problem Loans
    • Commercial Loan Structuring
    • Identifying Viable Secondary and Tertiary Sources of Repayment
    • Key Documents, Loan Agreements and Covenants
    • Loan Pricing and Negotiating
    • Problem Loans

The estimated time to complete all courses is approximately 33 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

ABA Certificate in BSA and AML Compliance

Financial institutions face increased risk from advanced money-laundering schemes and terrorist financing activities. It is critical that banks hire and train individuals who can establish and maintain an effective BSA/AML program. The ABA Certificate in BSA and AML Compliance will help financial crimes professionals improve their ability to detect and prevent suspicious and criminal activity by providing an overview of the types of criminal behavior commonly used against banks, and in-depth training on the applicable U.S. laws and regulations governing money-laundering.

The ABA Certificate in BSA and AML Compliance is an excellent refresher for experienced financial crimes professionals who wish to take the Certified AML and Fraud Professional (CAFP) exam, and may be required for those individuals with less than five years’ experience in the field.

Course Titles

You must complete the following courses:

  • Introduction to BSA/AML
  • SARs and Information Sharing
  • Currency and Correspondent Banking Accounts
  • Electronic Banking and Funds Transfer Activities
  • Higher Risk Accounts and Activities
  • BSA Requirements for Business Accounts
  • BSA Requirements for Foreign Customers and Accounts
  • Components of an AML Compliance Program
  • International Partners in AML
  • Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) for Compliance Professionals

The estimated time to complete these 10 courses is approximately 7 hours.

ABA Certificate in Deposit Compliance

Earning the ABA Certificate in Deposit Compliance demonstrates to bank management and examiners your thorough grounding in key deposit regulations, and ability to identify and respond to compliance requirements. The complete 11-course curriculum is available for study at your own pace along with unlimited access to all course content for 12 months — including any updates on new issuances and regulation changes made within that year. No other online deposit compliance curriculum offers this advantage.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Anatomy of a Regulation
  • BSA/USA PATRIOT Act
  • Digital Compliance
  • Electronic Funds Transfer Act (Reg E)
  • Elements of a Compliance Program
  • Expedited Funds Availability Act (Reg CC)
  • Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)
  • Privacy/Information Sharing
  • Reserve Requirements for Depository Institutions Act (Reg D)
  • Truth-in-Savings Act (Reg DD)
  • Unfair, Deceptive or Abusive Acts or Practices (UDAAP)

ABA Certificate in Fraud Prevention

Fraud management professionals face an increased burden to detect and prevent fraud losses against customers and their institution. The ABA Certificate in Fraud Prevention fills a training gap within many institutions and helps both new and experienced financial crimes professionals establish and maintain a fraud management program with sufficient internal and external controls. It provides in-depth training on the applicable U.S. laws and regulations governing fraud and an overview of the various types of criminal behavior commonly used against banks.

The ABA Certificate in Fraud Prevention is an excellent refresher for experienced financial crimes professionals who wish to take the Certified AML and Fraud Professional (CAFP) exam, and may be required for those individuals with less than five years’ experience in the field.

Course Titles

You must complete the following courses:

  • Introduction to Fraud Management
  • Establishing a Fraud Prevention Program
  • Types of Fraud and Prevention Strategies
  • Operating a Fraud Prevention Program
  • Maintaining a Compliant Fraud Prevention Program

The estimated time to complete these 5 courses is approximately 5 hrs and 20min.

ABA Certificate in Lending Compliance

Earning the ABA Certificate in Lending Compliance demonstrates to bank management and examiners your thorough grounding in key lending regulations, and ability to identify and respond to compliance requirements. The complete 17-course curriculum is available for study at your own pace along with unlimited access to all course content for 12 months — including any updates on new issuances and regulation changes made within that year. No other online lending compliance curriculum offers this advantage.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Anatomy of a Regulation
  • Community Reinvestment Act, Community Bank (CRA)*
  • Community Reinvestment Act, Large Bank (CRA)*
  • Credit Card Regulations
  • Elements of a Compliance Program
  • Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) Reg B
  • Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)
  • Good Faith Estimate and HUD-1 **
  • Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA)
  • Loans to Insiders (Reg O)
  • National Flood Insurance Regulations
  • Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA)
  • Reg Z Ability to Repay (ATR) and Qualified Mortgage (QM)​
  • Reg Z Closed-End Credit
  • Reg Z Open-End Credit
  • Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA)
  • Unfair, Deceptive or Abusive Acts or Practices (UDAAP)

ABA Certificate in Operational Risk Management

Banks are continuously improving their approach to manage key operational risks such as cyber-attacks, fraud losses, third-party service providers and model risk. The ABA Certificate in Operational Risk Management is designed to address training needs across the bank’s three lines of defense and maintain a strong operational risk management program. Understand the fundamental governance structures, procedures, controls, and cultural aspects necessary for an institution to successfully manage operational risk.

The ABA Certificate in Operational Risk Management is excellent for onboarding individuals with risk management responsibilities and refresher training for risk management professionals.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Elements of an Operational Risk Management Program
  • Cybersecurity Management
  • Fraud and Criminal Threats
  • Incident Management and Resilience
  • Operational Risk Model Management
  • Oversight and Management of Operational Risk
  • Payments and Settlements​
  • Physical Security
  • Regulatory Exam Management
  • Risk Control and Self Assessment
  • Vendor Risk Management

The estimated time to complete the 11 required courses is approximately 10 hours.​​​​​​​​​

ABA Certificate in Trust: Advanced

For the experienced professional, this online program, or immersive school, provides an in-depth understanding of the fiduciary role, and prepares wealth and trust professionals to propose sophisticated solutions to complex client situations covering estate planning, trust administration, investment management concepts and ethical behavior.

For those wishing to earn the CTFA professional designation, the ABA Certificate in Trust: Advanced satisfies the third of three levels of study required to sit for the exam.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Asset Allocation and Portfolio Management
  • Economics & Markets
  • Education Planning Solutions for Minors
  • Estate Planning for Charitable Giving
  • Estate Planning for IRAs and Qualified Plan Balances
  • Estate Planning for the Marital Deduction
  • Estate Planning Solutions for the Business Owner
  • Fundamentals of Alternative Investment Products​
  • Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax​
  • Gift Taxation
  • Income Tax Planning
  • Managing Life Insurance Policies
  • Planning for Estate Tax
  • Prudent Portfolio Management
  • Special Needs Trusts​

The estimated time to complete the 15 required courses is approximately 14​ hours.

ABA Certificate in Trust: Foundational

Individuals can earn this certificate – designed for those who need to establish or strengthen their understanding of basic wealth management and trust principles – either online or in an immersive program. Either option provides an introduction to estate planning, trust administration, investment management concepts and ethical behavior.

For those wishing to earn the CTFA professional designation, the ABA Certificate in Trust: Foundational satisfies the first of three levels of study required to sit for the exam.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • A Guide to Ethics in Fiduciary and Trust Activities
  • A Guide ​to Ethics in Investments
  • Estate and Guardian Administration
  • Introduction to Estate Planning
  • Introduction to Investment Management
  • Introduction to IRAs
  • Introduction to Planning for Retirement Assets
  • Introduction to Trust Administration
  • Minimizing Fiduciary Risk and Litigation​

​The estimated time to complete the 9 required courses is approximately 10 hours.

ABA Certificate in Trust: Intermediate

 Ideal for individuals with some field experience who have mastered the concepts introduced in the foundational trust certificate, either online or in-person. The certificate provides a more sophisticated understanding and further knowledge of the tools available to a fiduciary, covering estate planning, trust administration, investment management concepts and ethical behavior.

For those wishing to earn the CTFA professional designation, the ABA Certificate in Trust: Intermediate satisfies the second of three levels of study required to sit for the exam.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • A Guide to Ethics in Financial Planning
  • A Guide to Ethics in Tax Law & Tax Planning
  • Account Acceptance and Termination
  • Basic Characteristics of a Trust
  • Bond Selection and Analysis
  • Discretionary Distributions
  • Duties and Powers of the Trustee
  • Estate Planning to Achieve Client Goals
  • Fiduciary Income Tax
  • Fiduciary Law
  • Fundamentals of Life Insurance
  • How Trusts are Taxed
  • Investment Policy​
  • Investment Products
  • Stock Selection and Analysis
  • Types of Insurance
  • Understanding Transfer Tax​​

The estimated time to complete the 17 required courses is approximately 18 hours.

ABA Customer Service Representative Certificate Curriculum

The ABA Customer Service Representative Certificate addresses the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve superior performance in this important position within the bank. Customer Service Representatives (CSRs) conduct basic banking transactions and cross-sell bank products and services. Successful CSRs respond to customer needs with a thorough understanding of retail products and services, and resolve customer problems with knowledge of pertinent bank policies and procedures.

In addition to courses that address sales and customer service, the curriculum also emphasizes business ethics and banking fundamentals. Basic selling and cross-selling skills are covered as well.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Building and Retaining Customer Relationships
  • Dealing Effectively with Co-Workers
  • Effective Client Referrals
  • Effective Telephone Communication
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Introduction to Relationship Selling
  • Needs-Based Selling
  • Revitalizing Customer Service
  • Understanding Bank Products

The estimated time to complete these 10 courses is approximately 25 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

ABA Personal Banker Certificate

The ABA Personal Banker Certificate provides a blend of banking knowledge and skills for Personal Bankers, sometimes referred to as Financial Services Representatives or Financial Services Associates, to enable them to provide full-service banking to customers by offering appropriate credit, deposit, and other banking services that meet customer needs and expectations.

Personal Bankers often drive the sales and service function in the bank office or branch, and call on potential and current customers to develop new business relationships and to support customer retention strategies. They require broad product knowledge, including specific understanding of the different types of retail deposit and loan products, all of which are covered in this curriculum.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Building and Retaining Customer Relationships
  • Consumer Credit Products
  • Dealing Effectively with Co-Workers
  • Effective Client Referrals
  • Effective Written Communication
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Fundamentals of Consumer Lending
  • Fundamentals of Small Business Banking
  • Introduction to Relationship Selling
  • Introduction to Analyzing Financial Statements
  • Managing Time at Work
  • Needs-Based Selling
  • Tele-consulting
  • Understanding Bank Products

The estimated time to complete these 15 courses is approximately 43 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

ABA Residential Mortgage Lender Certificate

Mortgage Loans are a core product for most banks. Despite the slew of new regulations, customers continue to buy and refinance their homes and they expect their bank will provide them a variety of mortgage options to meet their needs.

The ABA Residential Mortgage Lender Certificate provides a solid understanding of banking, credit analysis, and legal principles that support the mortgage process. In keeping with evolving customer preferences, the certificate underscores relationship sales skills in addition to the mechanics of a mortgage loan, thereby preparing loan officers to be successful in growing their book of business while helping their bank acquire a deeper share of wallet.

The certificate is designed for aspiring mortgage lenders and those individuals new to the mortgage area of the bank, including mortgage loan clerks, loan processors, and closers.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Appraisal Procedures**
  • Basics of Mortgage Processing**
  • Completing the HUD-1**
  • Discovering FHA Programs**
  • Effective Client Referrals
  • Elements of Title Insurance**
  • Essentials of Mortgage Lending**
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Explaining Loan Modifications**
  • Gathering the Facts on Mortgage Fraud**
  • Mortgage Customer Counseling and Prequalification
  • Personal Tax Return Analysis
  • Preparing the Closing Disclosure**
  • Preparing the Loan Estimate**
  • Processing and Underwriting Credit**
  • Processing Income and Assets**
  • Reviewing the Appraisal Report**

The estimated time to complete these 18 courses is approximately 26 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

**These courses are offered through a partnership with AllRegs, a leader in residential mortgage lending.

ABA Small Business Banker Certificate Curriculum

This course is primarily for branch managers and branch-based small business bankers who need the skills to build a relationship-centric sales approach, engage business customers to better understand their needs and appropriate solutions, handle objections, plan and execute the perfect sales call, and manage relationships post-sale. These bankers typically do not make credit decisions.

This curriculum provides small business bankers with a strategic approach to building trusted relationships with business customers as a means to retain and grow their book of business. It focuses on the process needed to identify sales prospects, offer value-added solutions, and close the deal.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today
  • Calling on Small Business Customers
  • Credit Products for Small Businesses
  • Deposit Products and Services for Small Businesses
  • Fundamentals of Small Business Banking
  • Introduction to Analyzing Financial Statements
  • Personal Tax Return Analysis
  • Relationship Selling to Small Business Customers
  • Retirement Products for Small Businesses
  • Servicing and Growing Small Business Relationships
  • Small Business Borrowing

The estimated time to complete these 11 courses is approximately 19 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

ABA Supervisor Certificate Curriculum

The ABA Supervisor Certificate prepares new and potential supervisors for their emerging responsibilities with a combination of leadership and managerial skills, and by offering fresh insights on proven supervisory approaches.

The courses in the program explore ways to interview, evaluate and select employees while being mindful of legal considerations. The performance management process is reviewed in detail, with special attention placed on coaching, rewards and recognition, and corrective action. Managing employee relations is addressed through four major strategies: compliance with laws, managing diversity, handling work and personal issues, and fostering open communication among staff members. In addition, the certificate program includes a component on ethical practices in banking.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Coaching for Success
  • Corrective Action
  • Employment Law​
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Hiring the Best
  • Leveraging the Benefits of a Diverse Workforce
  • Managing Change
  • Managing Employee Performance
  • Rewards and Recognition

The estimated time to complete these 10 courses is approximately 19 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

ABA Team Leader Certificate Curriculum

The ABA Team Leader Certificate is designed to help individuals develop the necessary skills to effectively lead and manage teams. The courses in the program have been developed for bankers, and are presented in the context of banking. The program is appropriate for bankers who have direct supervisory responsibility for team members, and for bankers who collaborate with others in the bank on occasion to meet common objectives and achieve specific results.

To build a successful team one must have the knowledge and skills to foster trust, leverage personal strengths of team members, manage opportunities, and set meaningful goals and expectations. Successful team leaders focus on both team purpose and individual tasks, promote shared responsibility for results, identify appropriate methods for rewards and recognition, and communicate effectively with team members and stakeholders. They also coach team members and help manage the change process.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses:

  • Banking Today*
  • Coaching for Success
  • Dealing Effectively with Co-Workers
  • Effective Written Communication
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Managing Change
  • Meetings that Work
  • Presentations Skills
  • Rewards and Recognition

The estimated time to complete these 9 courses is approximately 15 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase.

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.

ABA Universal Banker Certificate Curriculum

The ABA Universal Banker Certificate provides banking knowledge and skills needed for the newest and fastest growing role in retail banking. Universal bankers have multi-faceted job responsibilities, ranging from minimal cash handling and basic transactions to product and service sales, and referrals to other lines of business. The coursework in the certificate ranges from key product knowledge to relationship building, customer service, and expert referral skills.

This certificate is designed to help new Universal Bankers cater to a changing customer mindset by being the single point of contact for walk-in customers and fulfilling sales, service and referral needs. This provides a seamless experience and adds value to new and existing customer relationships.

Required Courses

You must complete the following courses: 

  • Banking Today *
  • Building and Retaining Customer Relationships
  • Consumer Credit Products
  • Dealing Effectively with Co-workers
  • Effective Client Referrals
  • Ethical Issues for Bankers
  • Handling Mortgage Inquiries and Making Referrals
  • Introduction to Relationship Selling
  • Needs-Based Selling
  • Presentation Skills
  • Revitalizing Customer Service
  • Understanding Bank Products

The estimated time to complete these 12 courses is approximately 25 hours. Students have access to the curriculum for 1 year from date of purchase. ​​​​​​​​​

*Banking Fundamentals (or Principles of Banking prior to June 2016) may be substituted.​​​

Account Acceptance and Termination

There is a risk in opening new fiduciary accounts. From review for acceptance (evaluating assets, key language and prior trustee activity) to review for termination, including procedures and best practices, this class will show you how to protect your institution while acting in a fiduciary capacity.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the account acceptance process
  • Describe account termination considerations

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Accounting

Topics in analyzing source documents, recording business transactions in a journal and posting entries in a ledger. How to prepare a trial balance, gather adjustment data and complete a worksheet are covered, as well as how to prepare financial statements and post-closing entries.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the basic accounting cycle and define the basic elements used such as asset, liability, owner’s equity, revenue, and expense accounts and posting debits and credits
  • Post to the general journal and general ledger, and prepare adjusting entries
  • List the steps in the accounting cycle; prepare a post-closing trial balance and interim statements and the statement of owner’s equity
  • Prepare a classified income statement and balance sheet, compute working capital and current ratio and journalize closing entries for a business
  • Identify and perform functions relative to bank accounts and cash funds

Audience: Bank personnel at any level with little or no accounting background. This course requires proctored exams.

Accounting Basics

The Accounting Basics course provides a complete foundation in basic accounting procedures for students who have minimal or no college accounting or business background, need a refresher course on accounting fundamentals, or need to prepare for further accounting study.  Bank and Credit Union employees at all levels are encouraged to take this course if they have not already taken a college level Accounting course.  This course is a recommended prerequisite to the Accounting course.

ADA Accessibility

Covers Title III of the ADA which involves accessibility in places of public accommodation, such as banks. Addresses effective accessibly, auxiliary aids and services, requirements for ATM and website accessibility, and legal expectations when a branch is remodeled or the bank builds a new facility.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the ADA requirement for reasonable modification of policies, practices, and procedures
  • Explain the requirements and standards for auxiliary aids and services that encompass reasonable modification of policies, practices, and procedures 
  • Explain the expectations for making new and existing facilities 

Audience: Bank employees who interact with customers, vendors, or other bank personnel.​

ADA Interacting with People Who Have Disabilities

Explores appropriate and practical ways to interrelate with individuals that have mobility, hearing, speech and language impairments, intellectual and developmental disabilities, and blindness or low vision. Explains how to promote successful use of adaptive equipment and technology or support that people with disabilities bring into a bank’s premises.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • List guidelines for effective interactions with people that have mobility, hearing, speech and language impairments, intellectual and developmental disabilities, and blindness or low vision
  • Describe how to promote successful use of adaptive equipment and technology or support that people with disabilities bring into a bank’s premises

Audience: Bank employees who interact with customers, vendors, or other bank personnel.​

ADA Overview and Employment

Explains the fundamental requirements and prohibitions of Title I of the ADA and how it applies to all aspects of the employment relationship. Teaches bank employees to recognize employment situations that raise ADA issues and to address them effectively.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the protection of rights for people with disabilities provided by ADA and ADAAA
  • Identify a covered disability according to the ADAAA definition and criteria
  • Determine a reasonable accommodation for situations involving employees with covered disabilities

Audience: Bank employees who interact with customers, vendors, or other bank personnel. 

Advertising

This Advertising course presents a comprehensive view of the industry, from the creative stand-point while providing real life business examples. This course addresses the importance of Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) in the field of Advertising and how it impacts advertising strategy through featured examples of IMC campaigns.

Agricultural Lending

The Agricultural Lending Course introduces students to modern concepts and tools of finance, developed and applied to the agricultural sector. Using case studies, practical problems, and a lucid presentation, the course focuses on planning, analyzing, and controlling business performance in agriculture and related financial markets. Curriculum addresses recent structural changes in the food system, covering important topics such as the growth in vertical coordination within the food and fiber system, and the significant implications for financial analysis and risk management by those managing or financing the agricultural sector.

AML Essentials: A seminar for Compliance Beginners

Learning Objectives:

  • CIP Essentials: The ID Dilemma, Customer Verification and Know Your Customer
  • EDD (Enhanced Due Diligence): Is it critical in relationship management?
  • OFAC : What is required from us?
  • High Risk accounts and Compliance requirements
  • Compliance issues with Non-Resident Aliens and Foreign Individuals: An Overview
  • Global Emerging terrorist financing strategies
  • Methods and techniques deployed by money launderers and trends identified through typologies
  • Emerging trends in predicative crimes and the role of financial institutions
  • Legal entities and Private Investment Companies (PICs): Misuse in customer relationships
  • The role of legal professionals and their vulnerability in money laundering activities
  • Discussion of top destinations and originating jurisdictions for funds associated to criminal activity
  • No-profit organizations and their role in money laundering and terrorist financing
  • Political Exposed Persons and risk factors associated to the laundering of corruption funds
  • Trends in new payment/electronic methods
  • Methods of Physical Transportation of Cash

Audience: Participants who are beginning their career in BSA/AML Compliance, and staff in financial institutions with direct customer contact who want to obtain a general and basic understanding of the impact that Compliance has in their job responsibilities.

Analyzing Business Financial Statements and Tax Returns

This course is an analysis of business financial statements and tax returns, including cash flow statements.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

The courses included in Analyzing Business Financial Statements and Tax Returns Curriculum and their objectives are listed below:

Income Statement Analysis

  • Explain the components of revenue and cost of goods sold
  • Describe operating expenses and net profit analysis

Balance Sheet Analysis

  • Identify balance sheet considerations
  • Describe the different types of assets—current, other, and noncurrent
  • Explain the components involved in a liability and equity analysis

Ratio Analysis

  • Describe the considerations a lender needs to take into account when using ratios to evaluate financial performance
  • Identify, calculate, and interpret liquidity, financial leverage, profitability, efficiency, and debt coverage ratios
  • Explain how to use industry data when performing a ratio analysis

Cash Flow Analysis

  • Identify cash flow statements and reports
  • Describe the two dominant types of cash flow reports—indirect and direct method
  • Explain the direct method for operating activities and the importance of pro forma and cash budgets

The UCA Model

  • Compare the formats of the banker-prepared UCA cash flow model and the accountant-prepared statement of cash flows (SCF)
  • Construct a UCA model and interpret the results
  • Explain the advantages of the UCA model

Cash Budgets and Pro Forma Statements

  • Provide a description of a cash budget
  • Explain the purpose of a cash budget
  • Describe why a cash budget is a critical tool of financial statement analysis
  • Identify key financial information in the cash budget format
  • Analyze the cash budget to determine the effect on the operating cycle, working capital, and capital expenditures

Audience: Commercial and/or Business bankers and Credit Analysts

Analyzing Personal Financial Statements and Tax Returns

Examine personal financial statements and tax returns, including combining business and personal cash flows into a global analysis.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

The courses included in Analyzing Personal Financial Statements and Tax Returns Curriculum and their objectives are listed below:
Types of Personal Financial Statements

  • Describe the basic formats for personal financial statements
  • Identify the information that is reviewed and verified prior to analyzing the personal financial statement

Key Ratios and Adjusted Net Worth

  • Calculate and interpret the liquidity ratio, unsecured debt ratio, and debt-to-income (DTI) ratio
  • Perform an analysis using ratios to determine a personal financial condition
  • Describe the components of adjusted net worth
  • Use adjusted net worth to perform an analysis of key personal asset and liability accounts

Personal Tax Returns and Cash Flow

  • Describe the key components of a personal tax return
  • Use tax return information to develop a personal cash flow 

Combining Business and Personal cash Flow into Global Cash Flow

  • Explain why global cash flow is critical when making credit decisions
  • Develop a global cash flow and global DSC for a borrower

Alternative Delivery Systems

This workshop explores why banks are increasingly offering alternative delivery systems to their customers, and what features and benefits have the most appeal. In addition, they will learn about the advantages and disadvantages of each delivery system, as well as profitability and marketing issues. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: Explain why banks offer alternative delivery systems, including: Supermarket banking, ATM’s and kiosks, Debit cards, Telephone banking, and PC and internet banking; State the advantages and challenges to the bank of offering alternative delivery systems; Describe the advantages of alternative delivery systems to customers; Demonstrate how to effectively overcome customer objections to alternative delivery systems; Explain marketing issues related to alternative delivery systems; and Identify alternative delivery systems offered by the participant’s own bank.

Audience: Any banking professional who needs to understand how technology and other factors are changing the way banks service their customers, such as customer service personnel and entry-level marketing staff

Analyzing Bank Performance

An overview of tools and techniques to analyze and improve a bank’s financial performance. Participants observe the effects of certain kinds of risk on a bank’s financial track record, and the correlation between risk optimization and superior financial performance.

Learning Objectives

  • Use the Uniform Bank Performance Report to analyze a bank’s performance over several periods and against peer banks
  • Demonstrate the connection between a consistently high level of financial performance as measured by the Return on Owners’ Equity Ratio and its relationship to credit, liquidity, capital and operational risk for the bank
  • Identify the major factors that affect a bank’s financial performance
  • Identify key components of non-interest income and expense and explore strategies to improve performance
  • Utilize tools such as the Balanced Scorecard to assess and improve financial performance, including functional goal setting and performance evaluation

Audience: This course is designed for junior-level bank officers all the way up through CEOs who need to analyze their bank’s performance. Participants should have some basic knowledge of balance sheets and income statements.

Analyzing Financial Statements (Prerequisite: Financial Accounting)

A practical introduction to financial statement analysis from the perspective of the commercial loan officer. Gain the skills needed to effectively assess the risks related to a customer—current and prospective—and evaluate possible sources of repayment for the loan.

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the financial data and evaluate the risks of different industries
  • Describe the considerations a lender needs to take into account when using ratios to evaluate financial performance
  • Explain the importance of cash flow and the various tools for cash flow analysis, such as the UCA Cash Flow Model and Global Cash Flow
  • Describe the basic formats and analysis techniques for personal financial statements as well as tax returns

Audience

Commercial and/or business bankers and credit analysts. The recommended prerequisite course is General Accounting..This course requires proctored exams.

Anatomy of a Regulation for Compliance Professionals

 Describes how laws are created and how regulations are developed and structured to fulfill their intent. Explains the standard means for referencing a citation and tips for researching various laws and regulations more efficiently.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of federal banking laws and regulations
  • Explain how bills become law and describe the structure of a typical law
  • Describe the structure and format of regulations
  • Identify sources of guidance and practical tips for understanding and interpreting federal laws and regulations

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Anti-Terrorism (Patriot Act)

Explore the laws designed to protect financial institutions’ assets and help prohibit certain types of organizations from accessing the U.S. financial system.

Applied Financial Statements

This course will emphasize the fundamental techniques of financial statement analysis via the use of case studies to illustrate its use and implementation. Building upon a review of accounting concepts, the course will cover the analysis (including ratio analysis), and interpretation of financial accounting information including the balance sheet, income statement and statement cash flows.

Appraisal Procedures

​Fundamentals of appraisal procedures, including defining the role of the appraiser and the valuation process. An examination of the use of Automated Valuation Models (AVMs), the importance of appraiser independence and recent mortgage fraud trends is also covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize appraisal licensing and certification agencies
  • Distinguish the role of the appraiser
  • Identify appraiser qualifications
  • Recognize the components of the valuation process
  • Distinguish characteristics of automated valuation models (AVMs)
  • Identify appraiser independence requirements
  • Define fraud and identify its consequences

Audience: Lending operations staff, including: Loan Originators, Underwriters, Processors

Asset Allocation – An Introduction

Asset allocation is the process of deciding how an investment portfolio should be distributed among different asset classes. With the onset of computer technology, asset allocation has moved beyond the traditional view of diversification. Sophisticated investors are able to process huge amounts of historical performance data that enables them to construct optimal portfolios. This course looks at the importance of asset allocation and the role of diversification in creating market efficient portfolios. The course also overviews the different types of assets in investment strategies that support modern portfolio management.

Asset Allocation and Portfolio Management

Describes the purpose of the customer profile information collected for investment policies, and how model portfolios are matched to customer profiles. Shows how to distinguish between positive and negative correlation in portfolio diversification. Describes investment styles and strategies that can be applied to equity portfolios and diversify fixed-income portfolios.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the portfolio management process and typical customer profiles
  • Describe asset allocation concepts and strategies
  • Des​​​cribe diversification concepts and strategies​

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Asset-Based Lending

ABL includes an overview of asset based lending and the primary elements of collateral, monitoring and borrower reporting, but it is presented with elements that are important to the Account Officer’s position. An excellent starting point for new Account Officers to learn more about ABL

Objective: Participants will be able to use a working knowledge of Borrowing Base concepts and gain an insight to the key elements of collateral to monitor. This course provides a foundation for using and discussing the industry vocabulary, procedures and loan dynamics found in a typical ABL transaction.

Participants will be able to:

  • Calculate a Borrowing Base
  • Identify Ineligible Collateral
  • Identify and Classify Elements of Dilution
  • Discuss the Field Examination Report Elements
  • Identify and advise on the key areas to monitor
  • Have a working knowledge of ABL specific calculations

Audience: Account officers

Asset Classes – Part I

An asset class is defined as a group of securities or instruments that demonstrate similar characteristics, behave similarly in the market, and are essentially subject to the same laws and regulations. In simple terms, asset classes are the basic ‘building blocks’ of an investment portfolio. This course looks at how assets are classified and evaluated by investors and portfolio managers. It focuses on the equity asset class in particular, examining the features and characteristics of the class as a whole as well as its various sub-classes.

Asset Classes – Part II

This course looks at the risk/return characteristics and diversification benefits of other (other than equity) asset classes such as bonds (fixed income), cash and cash equivalents, real estate, and alternative assets such as commodities, private equity and hedge funds.

Asset Liability Management I

Increased profitability correlates directly to a financial institution’s management of its assets and liabilities. Users will learn how to establish financial goals, determine fundamental trade-offs between risks and returns, understand the link between GAP and net interest margin, determine conditions that affect market value of stockholders’ equity, factors that make assets and liabilities price sensitive, and managing capital and liquidity risk. A great employee development for current and future bank management. The following topics will be covered in this online course: Overview of Asset Liability Management; GAP and Sensitivity Analysis; Duration Analysis; Managing Capital Risk; and Managing Liquidity Risk.

Audience: All personnel involved in the funds management process. Any bank personnel involved in lending or deposit gathering, whether or not they are involved in the asset liability management decision process. Many of these types of participants have walked away with a greater understanding of how other areas of the bank impact product pricing and structure.

Asset Liability Management II

Think you have a good handle on the basics of asset liability management or you’re ready to take the next step? Learn the income-based and wealth-based approach to asset/liability management, GAP management of interest rate risk, how to conduct a static GAP analysis, calculating asset/liability valuation and market risk, regulation of interest rate risk using the Federal Reserve System’s IRR model, and explore hedging with derivative securities. Below is a list of topics that will be covered in this online course: Asset Liability Management; GAP Management of Interest Rate Risk; Asset/Liability Valuation and Market Risk; Regulation and Interest Rate Risk Management; and Hedging with Derivative Securities.

Audience: Those individuals identified in the Asset Liability Management I course that are ready for the next step and more technical information. Experienced funds management professionals.

Bank Bribery Act

Provides the tools needed to appropriately handle money, personal information, and trust, and explores how to comply with the Bank Bribery Act in order to prevent corrupt activities within financial institutions.​

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • ​Explain the background and purpose of the Bank Bribery Act
  • Describe the importance of the code of conduct in relation to the prohibition against bribery
  • Describe the general prohibitions of the Bank Bribery Act
  • Describe exceptions to the general prohibitions
  • Explain the disclosure and reporting requirements

Audience: Employees at all levels.​

Bank Management

The Bank Management course explores the services that banks and their principal competitors (including savings and loans, credit unions, security and investment firms) offer in an increasingly competitive financial-services marketplace.  Bank Management discusses the major changes and events that are remaking banking and financial services today. Among the key events and unfolding trends covered in the text are: Newest Reforms in the Financial System, including the new Dodd-Frank Financial Reform Law and the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure (CARD) Act of 2009. Global Financial Sector coverage of the causes and impact of the latest “great recession.” Systemic Risk and the presentation of the challenges posed in the financial system. Students will need a SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR to take this course, as there are many formulas presented in the material.

Bank Protection Act

Explains how the Bank Protection Act influences the procedures used to preserve evidence of criminal behavior or suspected criminal behavior. Describes the devices/equipment that must be in place to assist law enforcement officials in the apprehension of individuals who perpetrate crimes against the financial institution.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose and background of the Bank Protection Act 
  • Describe the tools and procedures used to identify persons committing crimes against the bank
  • Describe the security measures required by the Bank Protection Act​

Audience: Employees at all levels.​

Banking Law and Referrals

Explains the Interagency Consumer Protections in Sales of Insurance (ICP) rules on retail sales, solicitation, advertising, insurance products or annuities to consumers. Describes Regulation R that provides a framework for banks to refer customers to satisfy their banking demands. Describes the Loan Originator Compensation rules under Regulation Z that address limited circumstances under which a bank employee who is not a loan originator may make a referral

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of the Interagency Policy Statement and when it applies. 
  • Explain the Interagency Consumer Protections (ICP) rules impacting the referrals of customers for non-FDIC insured products.
  • Describe Regulation R exemptions that allow banks to pay bankers for referring customers.
  • Describe Regulation Z Loan Originator Compensation rules that specify the actions that only apply to loan originators.​

Audience: Any bank personnel who make mortgage, investment, or insurance referrals to mortgage loan originators, or securities and/or insurance licensed persons or entities.

Bank Financial Analysis

This course builds your knowledge of proper analytical techniques for evaluating the financial condition of a financial institution. Subjects include an in-depth look into the Uniform Bank Financial Report, operating ratio analysis, capital components, return on assets, establishing net interest margin, rate sensitivity, asset and liability liquidity sources, and many more financial components utilized in conducting a bank financial analysis. The course even includes a case study to test your knowledge of proper analytical techniques.

Bank Secrecy Act (BSA)

The BSA helps the United States government combat money laundering and other illegal financial activity. Learn about BSA-related identification, record-keeping and reporting requirements.

Banking Fundamentals

This course includes three 4-week courses that combine the principles of the banking industry with real-world application. Ideal for emerging bankers, or bankers seeking to gain an understanding of the changing world of financial services. It is an online, paperless, series of courses the combines peer collaboration with instructor guidance.​

Included Courses:

  • The Banking Industry
  • Bank Lines of Business
  • Building Customer Relationships

What You’ll Learn

  • The role of banks in the U.S. economy
  • Meeting the changing needs of customers
  • Bank products and services, including electronic banking
  • Building customer relationships
  • Major banking laws and regulations

Bank Lines of Business

This course is a comprehensive review of the products and services that banks offer customers—from deposit products to insurance and investments—and strategies for retaining and growing market share. This program deepens and broadens your bank employees understanding of how banks serve individual, small business and corporate customers’ financial service needs. (4 weeks)

Bank Lines of Business is one of three Banking Fundamentals courses that explore the principles of the banking industry. Enroll in one, two, or all three to meet your needs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss account ownership
  • Identify the products and services banks offer to consumers and businesses
  • Explain the check payment process
  • Discuss electronic banking and the electronic funds transfer system
  • Explain banking laws and regulations as they relate to lines of business

Audience: Anyone who needs an introduction to banking, whether just starting a career or a more experienced professional from a different industry.​​​​​​​​​​​

Banking Today

This course introduces new employees to the essential principles, concepts, and operations of banking. It provides a “big picture” perspective of the financial services industry. In addition to becoming familiar with current banking trends, students will learn how banks operate as businesses and their impact on the economy.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe how banks organize to achieve their goals
  • Describe the Federal Reserve’s organization and function
  • Explain how banks operate as a business to make a profit
  • Summarize important federal laws and regulations affecting bank operations and practices
  • Examine the categories of bank products and services
  • Describe bank challenges in the financial marketplace and trends likely to affect the future of banking

Audience: Bank personnel new to the banking industry at all levels, specialists in non-banking functions such as marketing, information systems, and human resources.

Basic Administrative Duties of a Trustee

An interactive explanation of fiduciary duties, including administration of agency and estate accounts, guardianships and irrevocable trusts and what to do in the event of incapacity. Students will also get a foundation in estate administration.

Recommended Prerequisite: Introduction to Trust Products and Services

Learning Objectives

  • Define and explain a will, who can establish a will and testamentary capacity
  • Define probate and the steps associated with administration and settlement of an estate
  • Distinguish types of trusts, reasons for having a trust and characteristics of a good trustee
  • Discuss a trustee’s standard of performance and the basic principles of trust administration

Audience: Those employees who have recently joined the trust department in support positions, non-trust personnel within the bank who work with trust officers and trust clients, as well as employees of service providers to trust companies who want to develop a better understanding of their clients’ business needs.

Basic Characteristics of a Trust

Trusts may come in all shapes and sizes and are created for a variety of reasons, but they have common features and benefits. This course will take you through the how and why of creating a trust – giving you the tools to match your client’s goals to the best trust vehicle.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the main features and benefits of trusts to clients
  • Describe the trust creation process
  • Describe the different types of trusts

​Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Basics of Mortgage Processing

The role of loan processors in the overall mortgage loan process, and strategies on how best to communicate with them are covered in this course. It also focuses on the importance of the Uniform Residential Loan Application (URLA) as a central and vital document.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the steps in the mortgage loan process
  • Recognize the roles of key people in the loan process
  • Distinguish various job descriptions and best practices for processors
  • Complete the Uniform Residential Loan Application
  • Recognize the importance of communication

Audience: This course is designed for anyone who works in the mortgage industry seeking to learn or enhance their existing knowledge of the mortgage loan process and loan processors. It is geared primarily for loan processors but contains crucial information on the mortgage loan process that will prove beneficial for anyone new to the mortgage industry.

Bond Selection and Analysis

Explores the different ways to look at bond yields that help explain a bond’s value to clients, and the importance of having working knowledge of duration as the most important measure of bond risk. Discusses investment strategy decisions that help clients to select investment options that meet their needs.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the features of bonds
  • Describe the different types of yield associated with bonds
  • Describe the importance of duration in bond selection
  • Describe strategies for selecting bonds​​​

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

BSA/AML: CIP Advanced

Explains the additional CIP steps to take at account opening to identify customers and confirm that their activities and funds are legitimate. Describes the documentation and enhanced due diligence the bank may require for non-U.S. persons, and risks to the bank when offering services to higher risk entities.​

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the advanced procedures to take to identify customers who are not individuals and their banking practices
  • Identify the types of identification and verification needed when opening accounts for the following entities: 
    • ​​Business accounts
    • Non-U.S. persons
    • Non-Bank Financial Institutions (NBFIs) and Money Service Businesses (MSBs)
    • Private banking and politically exposed persons (PEPs)
    • ​Foreign correspondent accounts
  • ​Explain how existing CIP requirements apply to prepaid cards 

Audience: Any bank staff establishing relationships with business customers, private bankers, and commercial lenders.

BSA/AML: CIP Basics

Describes the two-step process to obtain types of identifying information from customers, and risk-based procedures to verify information. Explains the procedures to maintain records of the information used to verify identifying information. Explores different ways to disclose the CIP notice at account opening.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify what constitutes an account and a customer under the CIP rule
  • Examine the actions to be taken in the two-step process of obtaining identifying information and verifying the identity of the customer
  • Identify the procedures for maintaining records of the information used to verify a person’s name
  • Adhere to established controls and review procedures for reliance on other parties
  • Identify methods for handling the CIP notice at account opening​

Audience: Any bank staff who establish customer relationships.

BSA/AML: Communicating with Customers about CTRs

Teaches how to explain to customers that the bank is required by law to collect and retain certain records, or make particular reports. Explains how the FinCEN’s educational pamphlet, “Notice to Customers: A CTR Reference Guide” can be used as a resource to help address questions frequently asked by customers.​

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Answer basic customer questions about the procedures related to Currency Transaction Reporting
  • Describe the purpose of FinCEN’s educational pamphlet, “Notice to Customers: A CTR Reference Guide”

Audience: Employees who are responsible for completing Currency Transaction Reports.

BSA/AML: Completing the CTR

Explains the need for and parameters of CTR filing as well as the key aspects of completing electronically filed CTRs, and CTRs for armored car deliveries. Provides examples of multiple transactions and explains aggregation at various levels including customer, account, and conductor focused CTRs.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the circumstances when a Currency Transaction Report (CTR) should be filed
  • Learn how to aggregate multiple transactions for reporting purposes
  • Complete the three steps in a Currency Transaction Report​

Audience: Employees who are responsible for completing or reviewing Currency Transaction Reports.

BSA/AML: Complying with the BSA

Describes the key elements of an effective BSA policy and explains the responsibilities assigned to bankers to identify customers, monitor transactions, file reports, and retain records. Identifies the consequences for neglecting to adhere to BSA requirements, and describes what actions to take to avoid fines and penalties.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the “four pillars” of the BSA Program
  • Explain your role in meeting the BSA requirements
  • Describe the consequences banks may face for non-compliance

Audience: All bank staff.

BSA/AML: Exempting Customers from CTR Reporting

Explains both phases of the exemption process and the information that is needed and lists the business entities that are not eligible for exemption from CTR reporting. Discusses the reasons for possible decisions to revoke customer exemptions.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe why reporting exemptions advance BSA policy
  • Explain the division between exemption “Phases” and the conditions for obtaining exempt status
  • Identify changes in business behavior that can cause loss of exemption​

Audience:  Any bank employees who need an understanding of the exemption process.

BSA/AML: Overview

Explores the risk assessment components that help prevent the different types of financial crimes. Covers the three stages in the money laundering process and provides current examples of possible schemes. Explains the four required elements of a BSA compliance program that must be implemented.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the foundation of the BSA
  • Explain the BSA’s expectations for the components of a bank’s risk management process
  • Describe the impact of financial crime on society
  • Explain the funding sources terrorists may use for financing
  • Name the key compliance program elements banks must implement to combat financial crime​

Audience: Bank employees who need an understanding of core Bank Secrecy Act requirements.

BSA/AML: Recordkeeping – Wires, Money Orders, and Other Challenges

Describes information the bank retains for wire transfers, and the travel rule and the information the originator’s bank obtains and transmits for transactions. Explores the recordkeeping requirements for direct and indirect purchases of monetary instruments, and for extensions of credit, lending products, and other types of transactions.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize bank recordkeeping requirements for wire transfers
  • Explain the recordkeeping requirements for monetary instruments
  • Describe recordkeeping requirements for an extension of credit and other BSA transactions—including, FINCEN 314(a) and (b)​

Audience: Employees involved with originating  or disbursing wire transfers, selling negotiable instruments, opening accounts or taking loan applications, and responsible for record retention.

BSA/AML: Reporting

Explains the requirements needed to complete the Currency Transaction Report (CTR) and the Designation of Exempt Person (DOEP). Describes the BSA-required Report of International Transportation of Currency or Monetary Instruments Report (CMIR), the Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR), the Suspicious Activity Report (SAR), and SAR filing requirements.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the Currency Transaction Report (CTR) requirements financial  institutions must follow to be in compliance
  • Describe the qualifications and procedures for the Designation of Exempt Person (DOEP)
  • Identify the types of monetary instruments that must be recorded on  a Report of International Transportation of Currency or Monetary Instruments Report (CMIR)
  • Explain the BSA requirements for a Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Authority (FBAR)
  • Describe the purpose of a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR)​

Audience: Bank employees who need a basic understanding of any or all of the reports listed in the course.

BSA/AML: Risk Assessment and Customer Due Diligence

This course explores the factors that affect a bank’s BSA risk profile and explains the importance of proper risk analysis steps and factors to consider. It focuses on how to identify the risks and assesses the impact and implements measures and controls to reduce and manage the risk.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the factors considered in assessing BSA risk
  • Describe how a risk assessment impacts customer due diligence​

Audience:  CSRs, personal bankers, commercial lenders, and consumer lenders.

BSA/AML: SAR Filing

Describes the BSA requirements for a bank to file a Suspicious Activity Report and why federal law limits sharing information about a SAR, and the components of a SAR monitoring and reporting system, and how to answer the essential questions that comprise the basis of the SAR narrative.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the scope of activities appropriate for SAR filing
  • Discuss the importance of keeping SARs confidential 
  • Recognize some indicators of suspicious activity 
  • Describe the five key components of SAR filing

Audience: All employees

BSA/AML: USA PATRIOT Act

Builds the customer identification and due diligence process for specific types of accounts believed to pose increased risks of money laundering and terrorist financing, and explains how the USA PATRIOT Act affects sharing of certain types of information between financial institutions and law enforcement officials.

Note: This is a high-level overview course intended for employees that do not necessarily need a deep dive into the requirements of the USA PATRIOT Act. Many of the lessons included in this course are covered in more depth in other BSA courses such as BSA/AML: CIP Basics, BSA/AML: CIP Advanced, BSA/AML Recordkeeping, and BSA/AML: Risk Assessment and Customer Due Diligence.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of the USA PATRIOT Act and the penalties for noncompliance
  • Describe actions to take if you suspect that an account may fall within a high-risk category
  • Identify customer due diligence requirements for foreign correspondence accounts
  • Identify customer due diligence requirements for private banking accounts
  • Describe the information sharing requirements in Sections 314(a) and 314(b) of the USA PATRIOT Act​

Audience: All employees

BSA/USA PATRIOT Act for Compliance Professionals

Builds the customer identification and due diligence process for specific types of accounts believed to pose increased risks of money laundering and terrorist financing. Explains how the USA PATRIOT Act affects sharing of certain types of information between financial institutions and law enforcement officials.​

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of a risk assessment program
  • Describe the purpose and significance of the customer identification program
  • Discuss your bank’s customer due diligence policies, procedures and processes
  • Explain the requirements for suspicious activity reporting
  • Identify currency transaction reporting requirements and the two categories of exemptions

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Building and Retaining Customer Relationships

This seminar provides tools to start, manage and execute a sales portfolio, and learn the strategies, from prioritizing clients to making sales calls. Presents sales portfolio techniques and explains how to recognize, classify and prioritize clients according to sales potential profiles.

Also, it provides tools and strategies to build and retain customer relationship with an organized portfolio, Explains how to plan sales calls or contacts with portfolio clients.

Learning Objectives:

  • Process and Strategy: Describe the benefits of building and retaining customer relationships through a well-managed portfolio and the steps associated with the portfolio process, Set criteria that support sales and client retention, Assess sales potential of clients and group clients in a portfolio.
  • Calling on Clients: Organize a portfolio to support and track activity, Plan for starting a portfolio at work, Prepare for the initial contact with clients.

Audience: Banking professionals who currently sell bank products to customers. Students should have a working knowledge of their institution’s products and services, basic sales techniques, daily planner scheduling, and tele-consulting

Build Your Campaign

The majority of consumers go online before making a purchasing decision, and some only use their phone to buy everything from groceries to financial services. Learn how to reach the digital consumer by understanding what works and what doesn’t in digital campaigns.

Modules

  • Campaign Goals: Craft Your Objective
  • Campaign Types: Explore Options
  • Targeting: Find Your Customers

What You’ll  Learn

  • Connect common marketing goals with digital marketing strategies
  • Describe common digital marketing campaign approaches
  • Select from a variety of targeting options to reach intended audiences

Audience: Marketing professionals.

Business Communications

This course takes you through a well-developed, consistently applied process approach to communication that is combined with integrated, hands-on application of current and emerging business technologies. Students learn a process for solving future communication problems, and how to use Internet and electronic media to deliver their message, resulting in a tangible communication strategy they can use throughout their careers.

Business Ethics

The Business Ethics course provides a unique multidisciplinary approach in critical analysis and integrates the perspective of philosophy with management, law, economics, and public policy; providing a clear, concise, yet reasonably comprehensive introductory survey of the ethical choices available to us in business.

Business Math Review

Participants will learn shortcuts for standard calculating processes as well as use percentages, decimals, fractions, whole numbers and solve equations. They will complete deposit slips, checks, check registers and bank reconciliation, as well as calculate interest and maturity value, determine and investment’s present and future value and identify tax withholdings and other paycheck deductions.

Audience: Anyone who wants to improve the speed and accuracy of financial calculations, including lending & branch personnel and accounting & financial employees.

Business Tax Return Analysis – Seminar

Explains how to analyze tax returns to determine a projected income and explores income trends, recurring versus non-recurring income, and how tax returns can be used as a sales tool. ​

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

  • After completing this course, students will be able to:
  • Identify income trends and non-recurring situations used in analysis, as well as cross-sell opportunities
  • Analyze wage and tip income including the non-cash and pre-tax benefits associated with the source of income
  • Analyze taxable and non-taxable interest and dividend income
  • Describe and calculate the source of income information on Schedule C, capital gains and losses, and limited partnership income
  • Differentiate the areas on Schedule E and calculate rental income​

Audience: Bank personnel who are in a position to use personal tax returns from clients for lending analysis

C & I (Commercial and Industrial) Lending

Standard Products:

  • Open Revolving Lines of Credit
    • ABL/Monitored Lines of Credit
    • EXIM Bank Facilities
    • Guidance Facilities
    • Equipment Loans
    • Owner-Occupied Mortgages
    • Letters of Credit
    • SBA Guaranteed Facilities

Credit:
For the above products, differentiate the analytic approach for:
• What financial information is necessary for review?
• What is the primary source of repayment?
• What are the differences in analyzing cash flow (traditional vs. operating)
• Transaction structure and monitoring controls?
• Determine what caused the need to borrow and tie the need to facility

Other topics:
• Company revenue trend in this down economy.
• Understanding relationship among receivables, payable, inventory and revenue levels.
• How does the financial position compare to their current industry standards?
• Business and industry risks
• Scalability of expenses.
• Reliability of suppliers and customers.
• Guarantors’ recent changes in financial condition and how does it relate to company
• Contingent debt and ability to handle both personally and corporate.
• Breakeven analysis for revenue, GPM, operating expenses, projections.
• Package contents i.e. Financial statements, tax returns, agings, company and guarantor background
• Statement quality and the importance of interims and comparable interims.
• Financial ratios

Sales:
• Who is your target market?
• Know your borrower
• Desirable / undesirable credits
• Understanding customer needs; selling appropriately.
• Full relationship – better understanding and insight.
• Pricing

Audience: Anyone interested in Commercial & Industrial Lending

Calling on Small Business Customers

Guidelines for planning effective calls and how to strategize the actions to take during calls. Working with small business clients by using the steps in the Call Planning Model and gathering resources and identifying goals for the calls is also covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the importance of planning calls and setting call priorities
  • Use the Relationship Selling Model and the Call Planning Model as tools for building and maximizing client relationships
  • Develop action strategies to help you successfully close a call and build a strong business relationship

Audience: Bank personnel who are responsible for face-to-face small business customer calls.

Cash Flow Analysis – Advanced

The question of repayment ability is central to any commercial lending request. In order to be approved for a loan, businesses need to establish their ability to generate enough cash flow to service both existing and proposed debt. This seminar will examine cash flow from a number of different perspectives. Participants in this program will consider conventional cash flow analysis as a basis for loan repayment and also look at other factors and variables that can impact a business’ cash flow such as growth and mismanagement of operating cycles. During this program, a number of different analysis tools will be utilized, including cash flow statements, financial projections, and permanent working capital analysis.

Case studies will be used throughout this program to demonstrate the ways in which these tools can be utilized to assist lenders in the analysis process.

Sample Topics

  • Measure a business’ cash flow accurately
    • How to utilize cash flow statements properly
    • Predicting the ability of a business to service future debt based on the development of projected financial information
    • Realizing the importance of changes in Permanent Working Capital and how those changes impact cash flow

Audience: Credit Analysts, Loan Officers, other personnel with a basic understanding of business credit analysis

Check Fraud

Participants will learn major types of checks and their characteristics, check acceptability and authenticity, as well as learn typical check fraud schemes and warning signs, check security features and prevention methods for check fraud.

Audience: Customer service representatives, personal bankers, account personnel, supervisors, managers and tellers.

Coaching for Success

This course provides techniques for ongoing performance feedback and skills for recognizing a coaching opportunity. It will encourage participants to get involved with the performance growth of other employees to develop and enhance their skills.

Learning Objectives

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Recognize the need to encourage others toward personal growth opportunities
  • Seek out the potential of another person and support the person’s need to take on additional responsibilities
  • Invite others to stretch their comfort zone of skills and reach new levels of potential.

Audience: Any employee responsible for coaching others with or without a reporting relationship. This could include managers, supervisors, team leads and mentors

Commercial Lending

Suitable for anyone who wants to learn more about the commercial lending process—the backbone of most banks’ lending portfolios. Learn what goes into making a successful commercial loan and how to manage a customer relationship once the loan is approved.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize the process and types of information business bankers should acquire during a business development call
  • Identify sources of repayment that are appropriate for various commercial loan borrowing arrangements and the factors that affect collateral value
  • Explain the process and importance of a credit investigation
  • Identify and explain the loan negotiation process
  • Identify the causes of problem loans and steps to resolving them

Audience: Commercial and/or business bankers and credit analysts. Students should take Analyzing Financial Statements prior to this course or have equivalent work experience. This course requires proctored exams.

Commercial Lending Accelerated

The art of commercial lending is an ever-evolving process. As the economy goes through different cycles, the underwriting of commercial lending also revolves. However, the core concepts of assessing commercial lending credit risk remain the same. This course will focus on assessing portfolio risk, analysis of financial statements, key ratios and cash flow. The emphasis will be on practical tools to properly assess commercial lending credit risk.

Audience: Lenders who will be beginning or are in their first few years of commercial lending, credit analysis and loan review personnel, loan documentation personnel, and any bank personnel who need an understanding of the commercial lending function.

Commercial Loan Documentation

Bankers involved in commercial lending will want to attend this seminar which explores in detail the various documents typically found in a commercial loan transaction. Lenders, credit officers, paralenders, document preparation specialists, loan booking specialists and other bankers involved in the lending process will benefit from the thorough discussion of what each document does and why it is used in a loan transaction. While the emphasis is on commercial loans, those involved in residential lending will also benefit as many of the documents and concepts discussed are applicable to both types of loan transactions.

Topics include:

  • What areas of the law impact commercial lending?
  • What are the “fundamental” documents in a commercial loan transaction?
  • What documents are unique to real estate lending?
  • Which documents are used in asset based financing?
  • How are letters of credit documented?
  • Documenting stock-secured loans
  • What are mortgage spreaders? Mortgage assumptions? Future advances?
  • How can we minimize mistakes in loan documentation?

Audience: Anyone interested in Commercial Loan Documentation

Communication Skills for Business

This course explores the perception process that underlies and colors all communication. It also focuses on two communication skills that are sometimes neglected: effective listening and nonverbal communication. These skills are key elements in building good relationships with customers and co-workers. After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: define the five elements of the communication process and describe the key characteristics of communication; describe and identify examples of nonverbal communication and the messages they send when used; list the barriers to effective listening; and explain how understanding goals, norms and roles can help build better group communication; and list examples of norms that can affect team communication in financial institutions.

Audience: Anyone wishing to sharpen their communication skills.

Community Reinvestment Act

Explains how regulators evaluate a bank’s efforts to meet the credit and service needs of the assessment area(s) it serves, and an overview of the bank examination categories and the ratings regulatory agencies use to define a bank’s performance. Describes the items a bank must keep in a public file.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the primary purpose of the Community Reinvestment Act
  • Summarize key points in the development of the Community Reinvestment Act
  • Describe the information that must be made available to the public
  • Describe the categories for CRA examinations
  • Describe the ratings used to report CRA examination results
  • Identify performance standards used to determine the Community Reinvestment Act ratings for financial institutions​

Audience: Lenders and platform personnel with lending responsibilities.

Community Reinvestment Act, Community Bank (CRA) for Compliance Professionals

Describes the purpose, background, and importance of CRA. Explains the technical rules for small banks, factors to consider when assessing CRA performance, and consequences of noncompliance, and explores information about CRA ratings and strategies to maintain a Satisfactory or Outstanding performance rating.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of CRA, consequences of noncompliance, and evaluation methods
  • Describe CRA technical requirements​ for community banks
  • Identify factors examiners consider when assessing CRA performance
  • Explain the CRA ratings and key strategies to maintain a Satisfactory or Outstanding performance rating

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Community Reinvestment Act, Large Bank (CRA) for Compliance Professionals

Strengthen your overall comprehension of CRA and define key terms, making it easier to communicate with regulators and management. Examine the technical requirements for CRA public files, public notices, and data collection, in addition to learning CRA performance options and a bonus exam preparation checklist.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose for CRA
  • Define the key terms
  • Identify large bank technical requirements
  • Explain the examination process

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Completing the HUD-1

Designed to teach students to recognize each field on the HUD-1 form and indentify the requirements for completion. Includes a detailed explanation of each field and several examples that aim to clarify specific loan situations. While most loans originated after October 3, 2015 will use the Truth-in-Lending Integrated Disclosures (TRID) forms, some loans will still require a HUD-1.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize each field on the HUD-1
  • Identify requirements for completion of each field

Audience: Mortgage loan closers, Settlement agents, Post closers, Loan processors.

Concepts of Interest Rate Risk

This course was developed and taught by Olson Research Associates specifically for CSBS. Olson Research is the leading provider of asset/liability management reports for commercial banks. They provide the service called A/L BENCHMARKS®, which gives bankers the detailed analysis they need to effectively manage their bank for greater profitability. The course includes the evolution, valuation, and accounting for financial instruments. In addition, the subject matter includes recent developments in financial measurement, financial strategies, and regulatory requirements for financial risk management.

Audience: Designed for entry-level commercial lending officers, officer trainees, or personnel supporting commercial lending officers.

Construction Loans: Documentation and Disbursement Under Florida Law

This is single day seminar that explores in detail the various loan documentation and disbursement issues that arise in Florida’s commercial construction loan transactions. Lenders, credit officers, paralenders, document preparation specialists, loan booking specialists and other bankers involved in the lending process will benefit from this in depth look at the documents unique to construction lending, their purpose and effect, ad various aspects of Florida law that impact the process. The program includes a discussion of the construction loan agreement, payment and performance bonds, the notice of commencement and statutory notices to owner and construction liens, assignment of contract rights, mortgage spreader and substitution of collateral agreements and more. The concepts presented apply to both commercial and residential construction loan transactions.

The course includes:

  • A discussion of the loan documents that are unique to construction lending and why they are needed
  • Boundary surveys, foundation surveys and as built surveys
  • Notices of Commencement
  • Notices to Owner
  • Lien waivers
  • Lien Releases
  • Statutory construction liens
  • Loan disbursements and the bank’s liability under Florida’s construction lien
  • Guarantees of payment and performance
  • Construction Bonds
  • Title insurance issues
  • Assignments of contracts, plans and specifications

Audience: Loan processors, Loan administrators and those involved with Construction Loan servicing.

Consumer Credit Products

Definitions of consumer credit terms to assist in discussions with clients, including an explanation of the growth and demand of non-real estate-related products, real estate-related terms, and how to calculate the maximum loan amounts.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define basic consumer credit terminology to clients
  • Identify features of consumer credit products
  • Explain the two loan categories – non-real estate-related and real estate-related – along with the products associated with the categories
  • Determine the maximum loan amount available based on collateral value, for real estate-related products

Audience: Branch personnel who are responsible for discussing or selling consumer credit products.

Consumer Lending

Ideal for those new to consumer lending, as well as current lenders who want to enhance their knowledge. The course covers forming a loan policy, generating applications, learning about the credit investigation, and understanding the evaluation of and decisions that go into every loan application.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the consumer lending process
  • Describe various loan products
  • Identify components of the consumer installment credit market
  • Apply credit math and loan pricing principles
  • Recognize variables that affect loan structure

Audience: Entry-level consumer lenders, consumer credit personnel, and bank employees who need to understand consumer credit. This course requires proctored exams.

Consumer Lending Accelerated

Today’s consumer lending marketplace is extremely competitive. The best way to stay ahead is with a well-trained staff that makes a difference. The Consumer Lending course is a valuable tool that assists your staff in analyzing the consumer market by exploring market characteristics, market factors and developing a marketing strategy. Users will also learn effective loan pricing principles and formulas, plus a hands-on walk-through of the consumer lending process. This is a great course for any employee in the consumer or retail function of the financial institution.

Construction Loan Documentation

Construction Loan Documentation is a single day seminar that explores in detail the various loan documentation and disbursement issues that arise in Florida’s commercial construction loan transactions. Lenders, credit officers, paralenders, document preparation specialists, loan booking specialists and other bankers involves in the lending process will benefit from this in depth look at the documents unique to construction lending, their purpose and effect, and various aspects of Florida Law that impact the process. 

The program includes a discussion of the construction loan agreement, payment and performance bonds, the notice of commencement and statutory liens, assignment of contract rights, mortgage spreader and  substitution of collateral and more. While the emphasis is on commercial loans, those involved in residential lending will also benefit as many of the documents and concepts discussed are applicable to both types of loan transactions.

The course includes:

  • Understanding borrowing entities (corporations, LLCs, partnerships, etc.)
  • Documents needed to verify authority of borrowing entities
  • Evidence of indebtedness (term notes, revolving line of credit notes, etc.)
  • Mortgages (including modifications, mortgage spreaders, future advances)
  • Assignments of rents
  • Cross defaults and cross collateralizations 
  • Boundary surveys, foundation surveys and as built surveys
  • Notices of commencement
  • Loan disbursements and the impact of Florida’s construction lien law
  • Guarantees of payment and performance
  • Construction bonds
  • Title insurance issues
  • Assignments of contracts, plans and specifications

Corrective Action

This course will provide participants with a proactive approach to managing employees who demonstrate performance or behavior problems.

Learning Objectives

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:​

  • Understand the need to take corrective action
  • Describe the performance or behavior gap, clearly and specifically
  • Document performance discrepancies and take appropriate corrective action
  • Prepare for a performance discussion with an employee
  • Conduct a corrective counseling discussion with the employee.

Audience: Any supervisor or manager who has responsibility for evaluating and documenting employee performance.

CRCM Online Review

A convenient way to prepare for the CRCM designation from the Institute of Certified Bankers. Participants use the ABA Reference Guide to Regulatory Compliance as their study tool, listen to 10 hours of recorded lectures, and have access to a test on each regulation modeled after a CRCM exam.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain laws and regulations for the deposit function
  • Describe the laws and regulations that govern lending
  • Identify the primary information reporting laws and regulations
  • Explain the bank operations laws and regulations
  • Describe the laws and regulations that cover safety and soundness
  • Discuss the laws and regulations governing social responsibility

Audience: This course is designed for those preparing for the Certified Regulatory Compliance Manager (CRCM) Exam, including financial services professionals whose primary function and expertise focus on the application, implementation and maintenance of relevant federal and state regulatory requirements as they relate to a financial services organization’s business.

Credit Analysis

Attend this training and you will experience discussing and analyzing “real life” case studies and loan requests. This is NOT a traditional credit analysis class that solely examines financial statements.

You will have the opportunity to discuss loan scenarios, formulate answers and elevate your knowledge to the next level. You will also get a chance to “attend loan committee” reviewing requests. This unique seminar will help you to understand your commercial customer from their loan request through the product they sell.

A number of steps to determine this include:

  • The Business Environment – SWOT Analysis & Business Life Cycle
  • The Economic Environment
  • The Management Environment

From there you will analyze the loan request and develop a rational loan structure. As a result you will be EMPOWERED TO ASSESS RISK AND ASSESS AN OPINION ON THE REQUEST.

The skills and tools you receive in this training can be immediately applied upon returning to your financial institution. You will gain a better insight into the economy, the commercial loan environment, the business loan request, cash flow analysis, loan structure while touching briefly on collateral.

At the conclusion of the seminar you will understand the factors that impact ability to repay debt obligations and how to document the findings in a written credit memo.

Credit Card Regulations for Compliance Professionals

 Obtain a basic understanding of regulations specific to credit card, as well as applicable open-end credit regulations. Learn about the compliance requirements at various stages in the credit card process, along with other institutional concerns that fall outside of the process.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe credit card marketing requirements, including requirements under Regulation Z and Regulation B
  • Explain application and solicitation requirements, including requirements for direct mail, electronic, and telephone solicitations
  • Describe underwriting and account opening requirements, including verification of customer information requirements under the USA Patriot Act
  • Identify account management requirements, including requirements under Regulation Z
  • Describe other institutional concerns, including requirements under the Community Reinvestment Act and Right to Financial Privacy Act

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Credit Products for Small Businesses

Know the features and benefits of different business credit products. The course focuses on understanding the needs of the business customer via clues regarding credit purpose and business cycles, and matching an appropriate product to add value to the relationship.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Distinguish between product features and product benefits
  • Describe the features and benefits of:
    • ​Lines of Credit
    • Term Loan
    • Business Credit Card
    • Letters of Credit
  • ​Match small business credit products to client needs

Audience: Bank personnel who are responsible for selling credit products to the small business customer and/or responsible for identifying sales opportunities and referring small business lending prospects to the appropriate bank contacts.

Cross-Selling Deposit Products

This course provides the skills needed to cross-sell retail bank deposit products and services. The course explores the importance of cross-selling and focuses on steps in the cross-selling process: interpreting clues to customer needs, cross-selling solutions to match needs, responding to objections, and closing the sale or referring the customer to a specialist. Features and benefits of deposit products are compared to match ​solutions to customer needs. Participants receive tools for on-the-job use.

Learning Objectives

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of cross-selling
  • Describe typical bank products and their features and benefits
  • Interpret clues and identify customer needs
  • Cross-sell deposit product solutions that match customer needs
  • Respond to questions and objections from customers
  • Close the sale or refer the customer.​​

Audience: Any bank personnel in a position to discuss deposit products and services with customers. Participants should have a basic knowledge of their institution’s products and services.

CTFA Online Review Course

A convenient way to prepare for the Certified Trust and Financial Advisor (CTFA) designation from the Institute of Certified Bankers. Participants use the Wealth Advisory and Personal Trust Series (WAPTS) as their study tool, listen to 19 recorded lectures, and have access to a test on each subject area, modeled after a CTFA exam.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain how fiduciary and trust activities are related to basic trust administration
  • Develop an understanding of federal estate and gift taxation, planning for gifts and related tax-planning strategies
  • Describe basic investments management and the economics markets
  • Apply personal financial planning concepts as a tool to enhance client relationships

Audience: This course is designed for those preparing for the Certified Trust and Financial Advisor (CTFA) Exam. The Certified Trust and Financial Advisor© (CTFA) is applicable to financial services professionals whose primary function and expertise focus on the provision of fiduciary services related to trusts, estates, guardianships and individual asset management accounts.

Customer Due Diligence Requirements for Financial Institutions: New Guidance

On July 1, 2016 FINCEN finalized the Customer Due Diligence Rule imposing stringent requirements for banks and financial institutions with respect to financial transparency. This new requirement imposes a more detailed identification and verification of the identity of beneficial owners of business entities.

Major topics that will be reviewed in this seminar:

  • Fifth Pillar in the AML Program
  • Risk-based procedures for Customer Due Diligence (CDD)
  • Review of recommended Beneficial Ownership Certification form
  • Beneficial owners and individuals of significant control in business entities
  • Account opening due diligence requirements when opening new account in an existing customer relationship
  • Importance of customer risk profile, account purpose and ongoing monitoring
  • Beneficial owners and compliance with OFAC sanctions

Audience: Compliance professionals, Sales Professionals in Financial Institutions interested in learning about the new requirements associated to account opening for business accounts.

Customer Service Excellence

Discover why improving your service to consumers is a career investment. Learn how to provide service that meets the needs and expectations of every consumer. Course content includes: recognize the importance of customer service; understand the communication process; recognize the value of face-to-face interactions; describe how to effectively use the telephone to communicate; identify techniques for interacting with diverse customers; identify techniques for handling challenging situations; explain the role of technology in customer service; describe the importance of effectively working with internal customers.

Audience: Anyone who has direct or indirect contact with consumers.

Cybersecurity Management

An understanding of the risks associated with technology and its importance to the bank’s operations and its management. Learn what to consider regarding the protection of technology, systems and data from inappropriate modification or destruction.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Learn how technology used by banks influences cybersecurity risk
  • Describe the regulatory environment for cybersecurity, including GLBA requirements and financial regulatory guidance
  • Identify risk stressors that affect the level of cyber risk
  • Review the three key activities included in an effective cyber risk management program​​​

Audience: Risk managers and cybersecurity professionals who are responsible for implementing, managing and monitoring the bank’s information security programs and support the bank’s overall responsibilities and culture of an effective cybersecurity program.

Dealing Effectively with Co-Workers

An introduction to social behavioral styles and how the different styles affect communication among co-workers. Strategies and guidelines for dealing with difficult co-workers and the resulting conflict are also explored.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify elements that contribute to individual perspective
  • Describe how perspective drives actions and behaviors
  • Describe how behavior choices impact the work environment
  • Describe the characteristics and behaviors of the four base preference groups
  • Explain the differences found in the same base preference group
  • Describe how to look at things from a different perspective
  • Describe the benefits and challenges of working with behavioral opposites
  • Use the five steps to enhance the working relationship with a difficult co-worker
  • Describe the benefits of focusing on what someone else finds important​

Audience: Bank personnel at all levels.

Deposit Accounts & Services

Participants will understand deposit investment counseling, such as, state the account owner’s rights and responsibilities, define single, joint, corporate, partnership, and trust account ownership. They will understand contributions and distributions of Traditional, Roth, Education, SEP and SIMPLE IRAs and administer decedent accounts when an owner dies testate or intestate.

Audience: Financial counselors, personal bankers, supervisors, managers, tellers, customer service representatives.

Deposit Products and Services for Small Businesses

Gain an understanding of general banking needs of business customers. The course covers common deposit and non-credit products, and their benefits to the small business client. Special emphasis is placed on connecting banking needs with the lifecycle of the business.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the small business market and identify the banking needs of small business clients
  • Explain the importance of small business clients to banks
  • Describe the features and benefits of business products and services
  • Identify the life stages of a small business and the products and services that target the small business client’s needs

Audience: Bank personnel who are new to the small business market and who are responsible for providing services to small business customers.

Digital Compliance for Compliance Professionals

 Explores the fundamental issues of compliance in the age of electronic signatures and the Web, as well as how to apply the various rules when engaging with customers and employees in the digital world.​

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the advertising rules for financial institutions
  • Define social media and the FFIEC guidance requirements
  • Describe the regulatory considerations associated with digital banking services
  • Explain mobile banking services and the regulatory requirements
  • Identify the considerations for a vendor handling a bank’s digital channels

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Discovering FHA Programs

An overview of the Federal Housing Administration and the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s role in providing mortgage insurance on a variety of lending programs. The course examines the basics of FHA programs, such as eligibility requirements, maximum loan amounts, occupancy requirements and mortgage insurance premiums.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • List the benefits and challenges of FHA loans
  • Differentiate between Title I and Title II loans
  • List insurable and uninsurable properties
  • Identify key differences between FHA and conventional loans
  • Review key characteristics of some of the more common FHA programs
  • Locate and use related websites and resources

Audience: Loan Processors, Underwriters, Loan Originators.

Discretionary Distributions

Fiduciary discretion can be a hot button in the trust administration process. This course discusses common discretionary standards, focusing on potential tax consequences for both the trustee and the beneficiary. The proper techniques for documenting the distribution decision process will also be covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe typical trust guidance for discretionary distributions and common discretionary standards
  • Explain how trust beneficiary circumstances and taxes can affect discretionary distribution decisions
  • Describe the documentation requirements associated with discretionary distributions

Audience: Trust officers with at least thr​​​ee years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Duties and Powers of the Trustee

Explains the scope of a trustee’s authority. This course describes the duty of loyalty, the duty to preserve trust property, and the duty to keep accounts. It covers how a prudent trustee would delegate authority as a co-trustee. This course illustrates the relationship between the terms of the trust and the trust’s administration. This course explains trust administration during the settlor’s lifetime and following the settlor’s death, and defines discretionary powers. This course also teaches how to identify issues related to trustee vacancies and successor trustees.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe a prudent trustee’s duties and behaviors
  • Describe a trustee’s administrative duties
  • Explain the powers of the trustee during the settlor’s lifetime and after the settlor’s death

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

E-Commerce Fundamentals for Bankers

Provides participants an understanding of the basics of conducting business online. Covers e-commerce and how it impacts traditional business and banking models, the similarities and differences between traditional and electronic commerce, the role each participant plays in the e-commerce process, how to prepare a business for e-business legal issues surrounding the new medium, the technologies used to place orders and process payments.

E-SIGN Compliance

Summarizes key aspects of compliance with the E-SIGN Act to assist banks to comply with the act.  Covers compliance with the E-SIGN Act provisions including consumer disclosure and consent, types of electronic disclosures that require consumer consent, and methods for obtaining demonstrable consent. Explains E-signatures and E-SIGN record retention requirements.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the E-SIGN Act’s purpose and requirements for bank consumer transactions
  • Describe the impact of E-SIGN on your bank’s compliance with existing regulations 
  • Identify the planning considerations and requirements for implementing digital signatures in your bank​​

Audience: Employees who open accounts or sign-up consumers for electronic statements or disclosures. Loan personnel who provide disclosures electronically. Employees involved in e-commerce or electronic banking. Individual involved with contracts with vendors and third parties. Back office personnel who facilitate electronic statements or disclosures, and IT personnel involved in systems design.

Economics & Markets

Explains the macro-economic forces that affect financial markets and investment portfolios enabling advisors to have a deeper conversation about these topics with clients. Introduces the important relationship between interest rates and inflation, and explores the causes and effects of inflation and how inflation is measured.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the relationships between macro-economic forces and financial markets
  • Explain how the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) affects the business cycle
  • Describe how changes in interest rates affect financial markets and investors
  • Describe how inflation affects GDP and investor buying decisions
  • Distinguish between the government’s fiscal policy and the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Economics for Bankers

An introduction to the fundamental principles of economics and why they matter to banks. Emphasis is on topics including gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, the national debt and the money supply, all of which affect daily personal and professional decisions.

Learning Objectives

  • Apply economic principles to important questions in the financial services industry
  • Use basic graphing and graph interpretation skills to examine economic questions
  • Describe the major economic policy problems faced by government: economic growth, unemployment, inflation and budget deficits and debt
  • Explain the aggregate demand/aggregate supply model and its importance in examining major economic policy problems
  • Recognize major economic policy controversies and the various schools of thought associated with them

Audience: Bank personnel who have not had a formal course in Economics and wish to increase their understanding of economics as it relates to banking. This course requires proctored exams.

Education Planning Solutions for Minors

Explains the advantages and disadvantages and tax implications of the 529 Plan and Coverdell accounts. Covers the benefits and drawbacks, including the tax implications of custodial accounts. Describes the fundamentals of 2503(c) trusts and Crummey trusts, including the advantages, disadvantages, and the tax implications of the trusts.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the use of qualified state tuition plans
  • Explain how a Coverdell Education Savings Account can be used for college savings
  • Discuss the role of custodial accounts
  • Describe the use of 2503(c) trusts
  • Explain how Crummey Trusts can be used in estate planning

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.​​​

Effective Business Writing

Participants will learn how to use the “you attitude” in order to write more effective reports, job procedures, memos, emails, and letters for good-news, bad news, and persuasive writing situations, as well as learn common business letter characteristics and formatting. They will identify the three stages of the writing process and special financial service writing characteristics, and write complete, efficient and emphatic sentences while building unified and organized paragraphs.

Audience: Anyone who’s current of future job requires effective written communication. Good grammar and punctuation skills are prerequisites for this course. If you wish to improve these skills, you may consider fist taking “Essential Business English Skill”.

Effective Client Referrals

This course provides the skills and techniques to identify sales and service opportunities and make valuable and effective referrals for core bank products.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe what clients expect from their bank
  • Identify the four steps in the Effective Referral Model
  • Identify sales and service referral opportunities
  • Match referral opportunities with the appropriate financial need type
  • Make an effective referral using the appropriate referral technique
  • Follow up with a client

Audience: In-bank and operations personnel who service client transactions and are in a position to identify referral opportunities.

Effective Communication for Supervisors

Effective communication is a critical element of successful supervision and leadership. From one-on-one discussions to group presentations, “Communicating with influence” shows busy mangers how to get positive results using proven communication techniques.

Seminar Objectives

At this seminar conclusion, participants should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the use of open and closed questions
  • Identify your behavioral style and its unique challenges
  • Describe a model of feedback, communication, and listening
  • Set SMART goals
  • List tactics for dealing with difficult people
  • Organize information in a clear and concise manner
  • Create an attention grabbing introduction
  • Implement techniques for varying your vocal tones and body language
  • Develop strategies for handling hecklers, bullies, and other participants

Audience: For Managers

Effective Telephone Communication (Telephone Etiquette)

Fundamental skills and techniques for using the telephone professionally on the job, including tips for cell phone users. This course emphasizes the importance of the telephone as a technology tool and includes practical guidelines and practices for its effective use in common business settings.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Prepare for typical calls
  • Set up work area to support organized telephone communications
  • Use professional call greetings
  • Use appropriate language and voice inflection during telephone conversations
  • Use questioning and listening skills that support effective telephone communication
  • Handle special telephone tasks professionally
  • Use effective skills when working with technology tools​ ​​

Audience: Branch and administrative office staff who answer calls or who make calls to customers and other bank staff. This course is appropriate for call-center staff as an introduction to telephone skills.

Effective Written Communication (Writing Bank Correspondence)

Techniques and tools on how to write clearly and competently for business professionals, as well as how to plan, write, revise and polish writing in a systematic way. This course provides examples of effective and ineffective writing, and how to improve various types of written communication.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Plan for a written document
  • Draft a document that achieves a planned objective
  • Revise a document to maximize clarity and conciseness
  • Choose a format that is appropriate to the content and to the audience​ ​​

Audience: Anyone who writes business correspondence such as letters to customers, memos, faxes, or e-mail messages.

Elder Financial Abuse

Explains the forms of financial abuse and how to recognize telemarketing schemes and online financial abuse. Explores the characteristics of seniors that make them targets of financial abuse. Analyzes the state and federal laws concerning elder financial abuse and how banks play a significant role in recognizing victimized seniors.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify financial abuse
  • Describe why seniors are vulnerable to financial abuse
  • Examine the laws pertaining to elder financial abuse
  • Identify the role banks play in recognizing the signs of elder financial abuse​

Audience: Tellers, CSRs and other Frontline bank employees.

Electronic Funds Transfer Act (Reg E) for Compliance Professionals

Covers the fundamental requirements of the Electronic Funds Transfer Act (EFTA) and Regulation E with examples of dispute resolution application and checklists.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the disclosures required by Regulation E and the penalties, and violations for non-compliance
    • Define electronic funds transfer error resolution
    • Explain how to handle inquiries about customer liability
    • Explain the Regulation E rules pertaining to debit cards and ATM overdraft fees, and fee restrictions and expiration dates on gift cards
    • Identify the transactions and disclosure requirements covered under the foreign remittance rules

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.

Elements of a Compliance Program for Compliance Professionals

 A must-have course for understanding the types of risk assessments, key risk indicators, the ranking of risk exposures, how to manage and control risk, how to identify risk trends and leveraging training to control risk. Learn tips on how to effectively communicate risks to your senior management and examiners.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the key elements that form the foundation of a sound and effective compliance program
  • Identify ideas and examples of various ways each element can be integrated into compliance programs for banks of varying sizes, resources, geographies, and business activities
  • Describe how to document and present compliance programs to various constituencies such as senior management, the Board of Directors, or regulatory examiners

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Elements of an Operational Risk Management Program

Highlights the benefits of a strong operational risk program and identifies the key components banks should include, regardless of size or location. Provides an introduction to key definitions, types of risks, key risk indicators, monitoring and controlling risks, and identifying emerging trends.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of an operational risk management program
  • Describe the categories of risks faced by banks
  • Identify the key components of an operational risk management framework
  • Describe in general the processes used by banks at each of these lifecycle stages:
    • ​Risk Identification
    • Risk Assessment
    • Risk Reporting
    • Risk Monitoring

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.

Elements of Title Insurance

Learn the essential components for a title review, as well as title insurance terminology prior to identifying the key elements of title insurance. You’ll also learn to identify the title requirements and exceptions and explain the required disclosures and closing protection letter requirements.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define title insurance terminology
  • Identify key elements of title insurance
  • Recognize the components of the title report
  • Analyze the key sections of a title commitment
  • Identify title exceptions
  • Explain disclosure and closing protection letter requirements

Audience: Mortgage loan closers, Loan originators, Underwriters, Processors​​​​​

Employment and Labor Law Course

During the past decade, American businesses have shifted their focus in human resource management and labor relations to employment issues such as wrongful discharge, sexual discrimination, and other employee rights. After successfully completing this Employment and Labor Law course, you will be able to: describe Employment-at-will; identify commonly committed workplace torts; understand Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and Race Discrimination; describe gender and family issues legislation, as well as discrimination based on religion and national origin; discuss discrimination based on age and disability; and understand and describe EEO legislation.

Audience: Human Resource and Department Managers

Equal Credit Opportunity Act (Reg B)

Explains the prohibited bases for evaluating an application and required notifications, and other bank compliance issues, including the requirements for reporting credit information, record keeping, and the consequences of noncompliance.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of ECOA and what it covers
  • Identify the point at which an inquiry turns into an application and what applicant requests are prohibited
  • Describe what banks must do to comply with ECOA when processing and evaluating credit applications
  • Identify reporting and record keeping requirements, as well as the consequences of noncompliance​

Audience: Bank personnel involved in the process of gathering information for credit transactions.

Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) for Compliance Professionals

 Learn major aspects of ECOA/Reg B from application taking through underwriting and evaluations, to notice and record-keeping requirements. Discover basic requirements of the Fair Housing Act, and rules for furnishing of credit information, record retention, collecting government monitoring information, providing appraisal reports, and conducting self-testing.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of the ECOA and the Fair Housing Act, and define key terms used in each
  • Identify Regulation B rules relating to the application process, from taking applications to notification of action taken
  • Describe Regulation B rules relating to the furnishing of credit information, record retention, collecting government monitoring information, providing appraisal reports, and conducting self-testing

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Essential Business English Skills

This course will help participants to use nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs properly. They will learn to recognize and correct personal grammar problems, identify proper speech and sentence structure, identify the proper use of plural and possessive words, and build skills in punctuation, capitalization, and number usage.

Audience: Anyone who wants to improve his or her language skills

Essentials of Mortgage Lending

Focused​ on compliance and highlights industry best practices, this course covers the basics in the life of the mortgage loan process, the production process, as well as insights into secondary marketing, servicing and mortgage fraud. Origination strategies, common loan products and essential considerations when underwriting loan risk are also covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define mortgage lending
  • Identify the steps involved in mortgage production
  • Describe the mortgage loan origination process
  • List common mortgage loan products
  • Analyze the underwriting process
  • Examine the role of the secondary market
  • Recognize servicing functions
  • Explain relevant laws impacting mortgage loans
  • Summarize the importance of internal controls and identification of red flags to reduce mortgage fraud

Audience: Lending operations staff, including: QC personnel, Loan Originators, Underwriters, Processors

Essentials of Workplace Conduct (Business Etiquette)

The four principles that guide appropriate actions to take in unfamiliar situations. This course explains how appearance can have a great impact on how others perceive you, and addresses etiquette factors in the work environment and in offsite work situations.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the four guiding principles of business etiquette
  • Introduce yourself or others appropriately to reflect professional hierarchy
  • Describe professional dress code and the effect of not following the code
  • Explain how workplace behavior can affect others
  • Explain how the rules of business etiquette apply to work situations out of the office.​ ​

Audience: Bank personnel in the branch and administrative office environments.

Estate and Guardian Administration

Generates an understanding of the estate administration process including deadlines, protecting assets, paying claims against the estate, asset management, income tax obligations, and distribution responsibilities. Explains the preliminary matters relating to guardian administration, including responsibilities in estate asset inventory and asset management and closing a guardianship/conservatorship.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define probate and the matters required prior to opening a probate estate
  • Explain the duties of a trust professional in estate administration
  • Define guardianship and describe the responsibilities associated with guardianship administration

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Estate Planning Final Case Study

This case study provides an opportunity to apply concepts learned in earlier estate planning courses to real-world client situations.

Audience: This course is appropriate for Trust Officers who have completed the five Estate Planning courses in the Personal Trust Curriculum Levels 2 and 3:
Estate Planning Overview
Estate Planning for the Marital Deduction
Estate Planning for Lifetime Gifts
Estate Planning for Charitable Giving
Estate Planning for the Business Owner

Estate Planning for Charitable Giving

The majority of estate planning clients have strong ideas about the distribution of their estate assets. For some, the beneficiaries are family members; for others the beneficiaries are charities. There are ways to accomplish both, which are explored during this course.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define and describe the characteristics of split-interest charitable trusts
  • Explain the tax considerations for exempt and nonexempt charitable trusts

Audience: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Estate Planning for IRAs and Qualified Plan Balances

Explains how to identify mandatory distribution rules for deductible IRAs and qualified plans. Describes the beneficiary options available and ways to distribute benefits for qualified plans and IRAs. Outlines the requirements for qualifying for the marital deduction, and how to fund a credit shelter trust with proceeds from a qualified plan or IRA. Describes how pecuniary bequests to charities should be funded, and the use of charitable remainder trusts as the designated beneficiary of a qualified plan or IRA.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze the tax consequences and distribution options when retirement plan benefits are payable to a trust
  • Explain how retirement benefits are coordinated with the estate plan
  • Examine the issues concerning making retirement plan benefits payable to a credit shelter or marital trust
  • Describe charitable gift opportunities for retirement plan balances

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Estate Planning for Lifetime Gifts

This course introduces participants to the concepts of lifetime gifts. It discusses the appropriateness of lifetime gifts, use of the annual exclusion, and various techniques for transferring assets.

Audience: Trust Officers who already have a basic knowledge of estate and gift taxes and who seek to expand their skills to enable them to advise clients with respect to clients’ estate plans.

Estate Planning for the Marital Deduction

When Congress passed ATRA in 2013, many people mistakenly assumed that the marital deduction was a thing of the past. In fact, intelligent use of the marital deduction is as important as it ever was. This course explains different ways to calculate the marital deduction and the pros and cons of each.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize the importance of planning for the marital deduction
  • Explain the various marital formulas and how they can be used in estate planning

Audience: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Estate Planning Solutions for the Business Owner

Your client has managed – and in many cases created – their own business, and yet may not have taken any steps to protect it in the future. This course will help you walk them through different scenarios, be it bequest to a family member, sale to a trusted employee or complete liquidation.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the estate planning challenges for owners of closely held businesses
  • Identify methods used in valuing closely held businesses, determining discounts, and structuring restrictive agreements
  • Explain corporate recapitalization and the utilization of freezing and deferral techniques
  • Describe the planning methods available for the effective transfer of privately owned businesses

Audience: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Estate Planning to Achieve Client Goals

Explains how to talk to clients about the estate planning process and needed documents for an estate plan and reach client goals. Explores the advantages and techniques associated with donating through annual and lifetime gifts to minimize estate tax.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the basics of estate planning to clients
  • Explain how the gift tax annual exclusion and lifetime gifts are used in estate planning

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Ethical Issues for Bankers

An overview of ethical standards for financial services professionals, including the importance of complying with their institution’s code of conduct as well as federal laws. The course works through some typical ethical dilemmas that may occur in financial institutions.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of ethical practices in banking
  • Identify the regulations that prohibit unethical practices in banking
  • Define the nature and elements of ethical dilemmas
  • Examine examples of ethical dilemmas and the principles that drive them
  • Use the four-step approach to resolve ethical dilemmas

Audience: Bank personnel at any level.

Event-Based Selling

The importance of having a purpose and objectives for attending an event, and the preparation strategies to consider before attending events. This course explores the advantages and disadvantages of a co-hosted or attended event, and examines the characteristics within groups to help identify the appropriate financial products and services.

This course provides opening techniques to start friendly conversations with clients and networking ideas to ensure that various interactions during the event are valuable. This course explores ways to plan an approach to follow-up with contacts made at the event based on observations and information gathered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing Part 1: Event-Based Selling – Preparing for the Event, students will be able to:

  • Determine the target audience and the type of group event
  • Identify professional and personal group characteristics and their commonalities
  • Explain how financial needs are driven by a customer’s professional or personal life

After completing Part 2: Event-Based Selling – Executing the Event, students will be able to:

  • Practice relax to open techniques to help establish credibility with a client
  • Demonstrate effective networking techniques for moving between conversations
  • Apply the networking tips to ensure you are an effective networker
  • Explain how to use the Customer Connection form for notes and a follow-up strategy

Audience: Bankers whose responsibilities include attending, participating in, or hosting community-based group events. Students should have a working knowledge of their institution’s products and services.

Event Networking

Focuses on enhancing networking interactions in professional group settings and on a systematic approach to group events. Explores how to be familiar with the host and attendees of the event and its purpose in order to prepare questions, anticipate conversations, discuss commonalities, and ultimately establish relationships to grow your business.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of determining the target audience and the type of group event you are attending
  • Identify professional and personal group characteristics and their commonalities
  • Describe the importance of having a strategy for preparation and follow-up

Audience: Bankers attend, participate in, or host community-based group events. Students should have a working knowledge of their institution’s products and services.

Explaining Loan Modifications

The role of loan modifications and how they apply to various borrower circumstances is discussed. Learn to identify eligibility requirements and procedures for obtaining a loan modification and identify how to avoid falling victim to loan modification scams along with resources available for reporting.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the role of loan modifications within the mortgage lending industry
  • Share insight on how loan modifications apply to various borrower circumstances
  • Identify key components mortgage components such as DTI, LTV, and various mortgage terms
  • Define Loan Modification
  • Identify loan modification options
  • Apply loan modification options to homeowners
  • Identify fraudulent loan modification scams

Audience: Loan Originators, Underwriters, Processors

Expedited Funds Availability Act (EFAA-Reg CC)

Explains when funds from deposits must be available for withdrawal and when holds on deposits can be extended, and the timing and content for providing key disclosures. Reviews the terminology used in Reg CC along with the disclosure requirements and endorsement standards, and covers Check 21, including a description of substitute checks.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Differentiate between next day, 2nd day, and extended hold availability schedules
  • Explain and share the primary benefits of Check 21
  • Describe general disclosure information required for all financial institutions
  • Describe the key rules for returning checks

Audience: Tellers, new account representatives, branch managers, and any staff members who work with checks and new accounts (NOTE: Reg CC training is mandatory for all affected bank personnel.)

Expedited Funds Availability Act (Reg CC) for Compliance Professionals

 Covers the basic provisions of Regulation CC, which implements the Expedited Funds Availability Act focusing on the provisions of the regulation that affect customer-contact functions. Provides an overview of the check processing system, Check 21, and remotely created checks is also included.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the types of accounts covered under Reg CC and the verbiage that must be included in a hold notice
  • Identify items that are subject to next day availability and exceptions to next day availability
  • Describe the guidelines for using case-by-case holds and exception holds
  • Describe Reg CC requirements relating to check processing
  • Identify additional requirements under Reg CC, including disclosure requirements, employee training, and record retention

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Extending Credit to Bank Insiders (Reg O)

Defines the term bank “insider” and the rules and disclosures that must be followed. Provides examples of employees who are considered executive officers and describes the lending restrictions applied to bank insiders. Provides examples of when the bank can make certain loans to bank executives.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe who is covered by Regulation O and the rules and disclosures that must be followed
  • Describe the lending limits and requirements when a bank makes a loan to an executive officer ​

Audience: Employees at all levels.

Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)

Explores considerations relating to use of medical information when making credit or employment decisions and adverse action requirements. Promotes discussions surrounding reporting and disclosure requirements including how to handle direct disputes, and explains circumstances surrounding risk-based pricing notices. Discusses the Dodd-Frank Act requirements pertaining to adverse action when a credit score is used.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the primary permissible purposes that affect financial institutions 
  • Describe consumer reporting requirements and overview of key notice requirements 
  • Discuss affiliate disclosure requirements 
  • Explain when and under what circumstances a risk-based pricing notice must be provided to consumers, and requirements to provide credit score information 
  • Discuss the DFA requirements pertaining to adverse action when a credit score is used​​

Audience: Personnel involved in using or reporting credit information.

Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) for Compliance Professionals

 Recognizing consumer protection is a hot topic, this course provides the key conceptual and practical information necessary to successfully apply the FCRA and Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA). It covers key terms, processes, notices, disclosures, regulatory issues and risk mitigation strategies.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the specific limitations on obtaining and using medical information in credit decisions
  • Explain the restrictions on sharing data obtained in consumer financial reports, and the consumer’s rights of notification and choice in this matter
  • Cite the consumer notices and disclosures that are required when credit decisions are made using data from a consumer financial report
  • Develop and implement an appropriate response process for your institution when information in a consumer report is disputed
  • Explain the rights and responsibilities of consumers, furnishers and CRAs when fraud alerts are placed on a consumer report

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

Explains the purpose of the FDCPA, the protections for consumers and requirements on creditors under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, what verbal and nonverbal actions the debt collector is permitted and not permitted to take, and the recourse debtors have against a debt collector for violating the law.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of the FDCPA and the types of debts covered
  • Recognize the debt collection practices prohibited by the FDCPA
  • Describe the purpose of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act as it pertains to debt collection
  • Explore unfair debt collection practices​

Audience: Any bank staff involved in collections, including individuals involved in calling consumers about overdrafts, even though they are not designated as “collectors.”

Fair Housing & Fair Lending

Introduces participants to the practices and principles of fair lending, and demonstrates how to avoid discriminatory and unfair lending practices when interacting with clients. Covers the relationship between unfair treatment and illegal discrimination, the essential points to the five federal fair lending laws and the Joint Policy Statement on Discrimination in Lending, types of illegal discrimination, and best practices to ensure compliance with the fair lending laws.

Audience: Bank personnel who have customer contact, and deal with consumer and real estate credit transactions including sales, processing, underwriting and compliance personnel.

Federal Estate and Gift Taxes

This course will give you the knowledge necessary to discuss the implications of federal estate and gift taxes, and to answer common tax-related client questions.

Audience: Trust Officers who have already achieved a basic level of knowledge and understanding of federal estate and gift taxes.

Fair Housing Act

Explores the FHA prohibited bases of discrimination. Describes the requirements of the Equal Housing Lender Lobby Poster and the Fair Housing logo. Defines FHA terminology and explains the recordkeeping requirements and the penalties for noncompliance with the Act.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the background and purpose of the Fair Housing Act
  • Explain the coverage and the prohibited bases of discrimination under the Fair Housing Act
  • Describe the requirements of the Fair Housing Act 
  • Explain the penalties for noncompliance with the Fair Housing Act.​

Audience: Frontline bank personnel such as tellers, new account representatives, and other entry-level bank positions.​

Fair Lending

Demonstrates how to avoid discriminatory and unfair lending practices when interacting with clients. Examines the consequences of illegal discrimination and explains the key points in the federal laws. Defines disparate treatment and disparate impact practices and identifies illegal discrimination that should be avoided at common stages in the credit process.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the relationship between unfair treatment and illegal discrimination
  • Explain the relationship between the fair lending laws and the three types of illegal discrimination
  • Identify the best practices to ensure compliance with fair-lending laws.​

Audience: Bank personnel who have customer contact, and deal with consumer and real estate credit transactions including sales, processing, underwriting and compliance personnel.

FDIC Insurance Coverage

Defines common FDIC terminology and general rules for insurance coverage based on the ownership rights of the account holders. Describes insurance categories and calculations. Explains the signage and advertising requirements.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe purpose and the basics of FDIC insurance
  • Explain the general rules, coverage, and calculation for FDIC insurance 
  • Describe possible unique ownership scenarios you may face and the insurance coverage for each ownership category
  • Explain general information about FDIC signage and advertising​

Audience: Employees with customer contact.

Fiduciary Income Taxes

Did you think you were the only one who had to pay income tax? Think again. Estates and trusts do, too. Fiduciary Income Tax will introduce you to the ways different entities are taxed and the deductions that are available to them.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the types of taxes and how entities are taxed
  • Describe the general tax rules and concepts for grantor, tax-exempt charitable, estate, and irrevocable trusts
  • Explain how income tax deductions play a key role in tax planning
  • Describe the tax treatment of beneficiaries for simple and complex trusts

Audience: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Fiduciary Law

There are significant differences between community, common and separate property. The Fiduciary Law course explores the legal implications of those differences, and the history and implications of the Prudent Investor Rule and the Uniform Principal and Income Act.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe powers of appointment
  • Explain interest in property and the protection under the law
  • Identify the characteristics and legal guidelines for community property, common law, and separate property
  • Describe the Prudent Person and Prudent Investor rules
  • Explain the issues associated with investment securities held in fiduciary accounts
  • Explicate allocation of receipts and disbursements between income and principal

Audience: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Financial Accounting

Financial Accounting teaches students the information needed to create financial statements, including trial balances, t-accounts, balance sheets, and various other accounts and their respective functions. This course emphasizes current practices of accounting procedures and includes coverage of the latest principles set forth by the Financial Accounting Standards (FASB).

Audience: This course is perfect for bank employee requiring a fundamentals knowledge of accounting.

Financial and Business Planning for Bank Marketers

This AIB course explains the integration of the marketing discipline with the financial and business functions of the bank. Marketing in banking has evolved from a promotions-centered function to an analytically-focused discipline and marketing professionals must demonstrate both creative and critical thinking skills. The primary objective of this course is to help bank marketers communicate and collaborate with other bank managers through a planning and budgeting process designed for their individual bank.

Audience: Marketing professionals and others with marketing responsibilities who want to better understand the bank’s financial structure, the mechanics of revenue generation, and how these integrate with marketing initiatives and strategies. It will be best appreciated by marketing professionals early in their marketing career, experienced marketers who are new to banking, employees who want to develop marketing skills, and managers responsible for sales or sales management.

Financial Planning Skills

This course provides participants with a working knowledge of financial planning topics.

Audience: Trust professionals looking for a big picture view of financial planning concepts. This course is appropriate for Trust Officers who already have achieved a basic level of knowledge and expertise in the trust field.

Financial Statement Analysis

Students explore the financial position of a business through balance sheet and income statement analysis, accrual and cash-basis accounting, categorizing current and long-term assets and liabilities, the effects of various transactions on the accounts of a business, evaluating the auditor’s report, categorizing debt, allocating costs, inventory evaluation and much more.

Find Your Audience

Learn about the variety of ways to reach customers and prospects, and how to combine digital ad options for maximum effect.

Modules

  • Search Ads: Get Found
  • Display Ads: Make an Impression
  • Video: Capture Attention
  • Apps: Engage Audiences
  • Text Campaigns: Think Mobile

What You’ll Learn

  • Describe key attributes, benefits, and metrics associated with: search ads, display ads, and video campaigns
  • Explain how apps and in-app advertising attract and engage target audiences
  • Identify ways to use text-message campaigns successfully

Audience: Marketing professionals.

Flood Insurance

This seminar provides participants with the opportunity to review the requirements of the Flood Disaster Protection Act and the National Flood Insurance Program (“NFIP”) and how to comply with these requirements whenever these requirements apply to a specific loan. Participants will be advised about FEMA requirements for determining the flood zone status of a particular property and the notice requirements that follow this determination. In addition, participants will learn about coverage requirements, map revisions and amendments, escrow requirements for the insurance premiums, as well as issues surrounding the force-placing” of insurance whenever a policy lapses.

Audience: Personnel in both commercial and consumer loan departments responsible for obtaining flood insurance for customer loans, as well as, personnel responsible for ensuring compliance with the requirements of the law.

Flood Disaster Protection Act

Provides an overview of the requirements enacted by Congress and the mandated flood insurance requirements for all federally backed mortgages, and mortgages and loans obtained through federally insured and regulated financial institutions. Explains the coverage requirements and exemptions, and the disclosures required in these transactions.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the circumstances and properties that require a flood determination
  • Explain the types of loans subject to the mandatory requirement to purchase flood insurance
  • Describe the minimum flood insurance purchase amounts
  • Describe the process for notifying borrowers who have properties in a special flood hazard area
  • Describe what constitutes sufficient proof of flood insurance and when it must be provided to the bank​

Audience: Frontline employees involved in the lending process, including mortgage, consumer and small business lenders, loan processors and loan servicing.

Fraud and Criminal Threats

Explains how fraud and other criminal threats affect consumers and financial institutions. Describes considerations when assessing the organization’s strength in each pillar of a well-built financial crimes program, and key components of an effective program’s operations.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of an effective financial crimes program and the risks associated with financial crimes
  • Identify the elements of an effective financial crimes program
  • Explain the basic four pillars of an effective program and the key aspects of each
  • Describe the day-to-day and ongoing operational components of a financial crimes program
  • Identify common crimes committed against institutions and effective counter measures

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.​

Fraud Identification

A seasoned state bank regulator facilitates this interactive, on-line course. The 5-week course consists of many activities, including: analyzing 21 actual fraud cases; viewing PowerPoint presentations on audit, internal controls, and cyber banking; reflecting on and discussing specific fraud issues; interacting with the other participants and the facilitator regarding these issues and the red flags associated with the fraud cases.
To fully benefit from the course, you should participate on a regular basis (at least 2-3 times a week) in the threaded discussions. The amount of time necessary to complete the activities is approximately five hours per week.

Audience: A must for all personnel working in a financial institution.

Fundamentals of Alternative Investment Products

Explains types of real estate investments and how they are valued. Identifies benefits and risks of foreign investments. Explores options, futures and forward contracts, and swap agreements. Describes exchange traded funds (ETFs) and common trust funds. Explains general and limited partnerships, and ways to identify the characteristics of closely held corporations.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe alternative types of investments to clients, including the following:
    • Hedge Funds
    • Private equity
    • Real Estate
  • Describe derivatives to clients, including the following:
    • Options
    • Futures and forward contracts
    • Swaps
    • ETFs
  • Describe alternative investment formats to clients, including the following:
    • ​Common trust funds
    • Partnerships
    • Closely held corporations​​​

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Fundamentals of Consumer Lending

The basics of consumer credit including terminology, categories of credit and credit worthiness. The application process and the actions required to ensure bank compliance with regulations is also covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe consumer credit basics including examples of consumer credit, the consumer credit operations of a bank, and the credit application process
  • Define basic categories of consumer credit and terminology
  • Explain how banks make money from loans including which rate types banks use, which factors determine loan pricing, and which loan cost categories affect loan profitability
  • Describe the credit evaluation and decision-making systems, namely the Five C’s of Credit and credit scoring
  • Summarize the impact of bank regulations upon the credit application process

Audience: Any bank personnel with little or no experience in consumer lending.

Fundamentals of Lending

A complete overview of lending with subjects including: establishing and evaluating the credit culture, elements of a written loan policy, overview of the lending function, loan risk analysis, the loan decision process, establishing loss reserves, the credit monitoring process, risk management, portfolio management, and preparing a loan review report.

Audience: This course is a great learning resource for employees new to the lending process.

Fundamentals of Mortgage Lending

This course covers the basic terminology and regulations of mortgage lending and also provides information on the secondary market. The benefits to a financial institution derived from selling mortgage loans are explained.

Audience: Participants who currently sell mortgages, or who are involved in the mortgage lending process.

Fundamentals of Life Insurance

Analyzes the types of common life insurance and the tax considerations and describes the inventory of life insurance coverage. Explains how to determine the life insurance needs for clients and compare their needs with their current policies.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss basic facts about life insurance
  • Determine the life insurance needs of a client

​Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.​​​

Fundamentals of Small Business Banking

This course introduces students to the characteristics, operations, and legal structure of small businesses. It helps students understand their small business clients by learning about the lifecycles of a business and the financial needs that arise during these different stages.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify common characteristics of small business markets
  • Describe different business legal structures
  • Match business products and services to business cycles
  • Compare the operating cucles of various business types
  • Identify the life stages of businesses

Audience: Bank personnel who have limited exposure to the small business market but are responsible for servicing or selling to small business customers.

Garnishments, Tax Levies & Request For Financial Information

What your customer can expect whenever information about their accounts is requested from the bank. Obtain the necessary information to properly handle garnishments, tax levies and other courts orders, which will affect your customers’ accounts. Learn proper procedures to ensure timely and effective handling of these types of legal action.

Gathering the Facts on Mortgage Fraud

The facts and types of mortgage fraud, and strategies to proactively prevent fraud.  Address critical issues like understanding the characteristics of mortgage fraud, recognizing fraud and identifying red flags in loan documents.  The course also examines the impact of mortgage fraud one’s personal and professional life.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Create a process based on lender best practices
  • Define mortgage fraud
  • Name types of mortgage fraud
  • Recognize common mortgage fraud schemes
  • Identify key characteristics of various types of mortgage fraud
  • Identify red flags specific to loan documents

Audience: Lending operations staff including; Compliance and QC personnel, Loan Originators, Underwriters, Processors.

Get Global: Understanding Global Cash Flow Analysis

Understanding how to calculate and interpret cash flow is essential for successful bankers.

This course is designed to assist bankers in calculating cash flow utilizing the Uniform Cash Flow Analysis (UCA) methods and to provide guidance in calculating Global Cash Flow Analysis for those entities that must rely on excess cash generated by their owners to service the business entity’s commercial debt. The seminar will begin by defining Cash Flow as the tool to transform an Accrual Basis Financial Statement into a Statement of Cash Flow and its importance to bankers when considering a long term loan request. Then it will proceed to demonstrate how Cash Flow is calculated utilizing the balance sheet and the income statement to determine the sources and uses of cash from operating, investing and financing activities. Next, a review of the owners personal financial statement and tax returns will be presented in order to determine the excess compensation necessary to support the debts of the business entity and the individual. That is the entire premise of Global Cash Flow Analysis. The use of several cases will be provided in order to demonstrate Global Cash Flow Analysis including a case for the Self-Employed borrower with interests in several business entities. Upon completion of this course, the participant will have a good understanding of how cash flow is calculated and more importantly, how to interpret its meaning.

Covered Topics:

  • An illustration on how Cash Flow Analysis is used to transition an Accrual Basis Financial Statement into a Statement of Cash Flow (or Cash Basis Statement) because loans are repaid with cash and not profits.
  • Review of the Rules of Cash Flow which are essential in determining how much cash is generated from items on the balance sheet
  • Global Cash Flow Analysis Methodology utilizing financial statements, tax returns and credit reports of commercial borrowers, and individuals.
  • Comparison of the UCA method of calculating cash flow to the less effective traditional EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization) method of determining cash flow.

Audience: Senior Loan Officers, Senior Credit Officers, Commercial Loan Officers, Branch Managers, Credit Analyst, Loan Review Personnel, Consumer Loan Officers, Credit Administration Support Staff

Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax

Does your family have a skip person in it? Could it be you? This course explains the intricacies of the GST, including taxable terminations and distributions, automatic allocations and just what a direct skip is.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define key terms related to GST
  • Identify the transfer categories, exceptions, and exclusions for generation-skipping tax
  • Explain the benefits of the generation-skipping transfer exemption and allocations in estate planning
  • Describe the concepts associated with calculating the GST tax

Audience: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Gift Taxation

Illustrates how to compute the gift tax, identifies who is liable to pay gift tax, and the impact of gift taxation on powers of appointment. Explores the benefits of a lifetime gift program and disadvantages of lifetime gifts. Demonstrates shifting income with gifting, and options for adults to retain control of property transferred to a minor. Emphasizes the importance of the marital deduction in estate planning.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the basics of gift taxation
  • Explain the exclusions and gifting options
  • Describe the rules and advantages of the marital deduction

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

GLB Privacy (For Institutions that do not share)

Review GLB Privacy Act opt-out concepts, terms and requirements as they relate to your role within your financial institution.

GLP Privacy (For Institutions that do share)

Gain a better understanding of GLB Privacy Act no opt-out concepts, terms and requirements as they apply to your role within your financial institution.

Global Banking (International Banking)

This course discusses the financial needs customers require to conduct business in today’s commercial global marketplace. The course describes the environment in which global banking takes place, and how money actually moves from one country to another. It examines how banks apply their traditional roles as providers of credit to the particular needs of global banking, and examines several risk areas that banks need to address in setting their global strategy.

Audience: Entry-level international banking personnel, corporate banking personnel, small business bankers, investment bankers, business officers, and other bank personnel.

Good Faith Estimate and HUD-1

This course provides timing requirements for the Good Faith Estimate form and HUD-1 statement for banks that make the types of loans requiring a GFE or HUD-1.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the Good Faith Estimate (GFE) and when it must be used
  • Describe the HUD-1 and when it is required​​

Audience: Bank personnel involved in the lending process who still need the GFE and HUD-1 for certain types of loans.​

Good Faith Estimate and HUD-1 for Compliance Professionals

 This course provides timing requirements for the Good Faith Estimate form and HUD-1 statement for banks that make the types of loans requiring a GFE or HUD-1.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the timing and content of the GFE application disclosure and the HUD-1 settlement disclosure
  • Describe the limitations on changes to settlement costs imposed by RESPA​

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Handling Mortgage Inquiries and Making Referrals

Describes the primary regulatory compliance Acts that affect mortgage inquiry, counseling, and application phases. Reviews the features and benefits of the most popular mortgage programs, important elements of different purchase and refinance transactions, and techniques and sample responses to customers for your mortgage referral to the MLO.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the phases in the mortgage origination process
  • Identify the important compliance issues that affect mortgage inquiries and referrals
  • Describe the features and benefits of conventional fixed rate, adjustable rate, FHA, and VA programs
  • Prepare and refer mortgage loan application customers

Audience: All bank employees who are authorized to discuss mortgage loans with customers who do not have special mortgage licensing credentials (retail branch, loan servicing, or call center employees and employees who are involved in mortgage origination, such as originators, processors, underwriters, closers, etc.)

Hiring the Best

Effective hiring techniques, including how to identify job requirements and rate the skills needed for success in the job role. Interactive scenarios are used to illustrate how to conduct an efficient interview that follows legal guidelines and maximize the use of the interview time.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the job tasks, skills, and proficiency levels that make up a job analysis
  • Prepare effective interview questions to conduct a legal, thorough interview
  • Follow proper guidelines for conducting an interview and pre-employment tests
  • Evaluate and select the best candidate for a position in a legal manner

Audience: Any supervisor or manager who participates in the position analysis and selection and hiring of employees.

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA)

Explores the types of loans covered by HMDA, and explains the collection steps for the government monitoring information, and the information required for reporting on the Loan Application Register. Defines the role of supervisory agencies and management in ensuring data is reported as outlined in HMDA.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of the HMDA and what it covers
  • Describe the financial institutions required to report HMDA data
  • List other Acts that support fair lending practices
  • List the regulatory agencies involved with HMDA reporting
  • Describe management responsibilities for reporting HMDA information
  • Describe how to complete each section of the Loan Application Register

Audience: Bank personnel with responsibilities for any part of the mortgage lending process.​

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) for Compliance Professionals

 Explains how to distinguish which institutions and transactions are covered by HMDA requirements and how to avoid the assessment of civil money penalties. Explores how to accurately complete a Loan Application Register (LAR) and the importance of management involvement in this process.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Whether an institution is covered by HMDA or not
  • Which transactions are subject to HMDA
  • How to properly complete a Loan Application Register (LAR)
  • Additional disclosure and reporting requirements of HMDA
  • Importance of management’s involvement

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals

Homeowners Protection Act

Explains when the right to cancel PMI is permitted, the exceptions, disclosures, and notice requirement for borrower rights to cancel and terminate PMI, the basic disclosure requirements for lender-paid mortgage insurance, and the liability to borrowers if PMI is not canceled in accordance with the law.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe when PMI is required and when it must be cancelled
  • Explain borrower and servicer initiated requests for PMI cancellation and exceptions
  • Describe lender disclosure and notice requirements for borrower rights to cancel and terminate PMI
  • Explain the difference between Borrower paid mortgage insurance (BPMI) and Lender paid mortgage insurance (LPMI)​

Audience: Lenders, underwriters and anyone who takes credit applications, as well as back office staff responsible for mortgage disclosures.

How Trusts Are Taxed

This course explains the most basic and fundamental tax rules that apply to most charitable and noncharitable trusts. This course explains how grantor trusts, charitable trusts, and foundations and supporting organizations are taxed. It describes the purpose of distributable net income, and explains the distribution deduction for simple and complex trusts.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe how non-charitable trusts are taxed
  • Describe how charitable trusts are taxed
  • Explain the distributable net income concept

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Human Relations

This course provides an examination of the evolution of human relations in the workplace, concepts of motivation, and leadership behavior. The role and function of the individual within an organizational structure are addressed. Topics include: how human relations is a key success; improvement of personal and organizational communications; identification of individual motivations; development of personal strategies for improving human relations; and how to achieve emotional control.

Human Resource Development

Employee skills and motivation are critical for organizational success. This course will help anyone increase their effectiveness, along with that of individuals with whom they work and the organizations of which they are a part. After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: understand the concepts, processes, and practices that form the basis of successful human resource development; show how concepts and theory can and have been put into practice in a variety of organizations; focus on the shared role of line management and human resource specialists in human resource development; and reflect the current state of the field, blending real-world practices and up-to-date research.

Audience: Anyone responsible for supervising or managing people.

Human Resource Management

This course covers all aspects of human resource management and its impact on both individuals and organizations. The text builds on a foundation of research and theory but also provides a practical framework focusing on critical issues and successful practices. Over 500 different organizations from a variety of settings are used as examples to illustrate key points and make the connection to HR practice. Important issues and critical trends are spotlighted in each chapter and reflected in the comprehensive and chapter ending cases included in the text. Managing Human Resources’ balance of theory and practice, hands-on activities, applications, and examples helps students develop the competencies to understand and help their organizations create a sustainable competitive advantage through people.

Audience: Human Resource Professionals, Office Managers and Department Managers.

Human Resource Selection

The Human Resource Selection course offers advanced treatment of the technical issues involved in developing and implementing selection programs within organizations. This course provides up-to-date research and applications for those already working in selection and provides current examples and exhibits. Human Resource Selection covers legal, global and ethical concerns, psychometric measurement concepts, job analysis, predictors of job performance and criteria measures.

Audience: Those working in Human Resources or who are heavily involved in the hiring process.

Identifying & Leveraging Target Markets

This workshop explores how to use Marketing Customer Information Files (MCIF) to group or segment a bank’s accounts. Participants will use this information to understand how a bank can market the appropriate products and services to their most profitable customers, as well as to non-customers who share the same characteristics. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: Define targeted customers and market segmentation; Explain how customer market segmentation can generate better results for bank marketing efforts; Describe how computer tools, specifically a Marketing Customer Information File (MCIF) and Market Analysis System (MAS) are used to target customers for marketing; Use market segmentation to develop a preliminary community based marketing plan that targets specific customer groups; and Identify methods for keeping track of marketing results.

Audience: Any banking professional such as entry-level marketing, branch, and operations managers, or other bank representatives who need to understand how to identify the target markets for bank products and services.

Improving Productivity

An overview of the main elements of productivity, with guidelines on how to evaluate and improve productivity in the workplace by introducing the six-step process to resolve productivity problems and enhancing productivity levels in the work environment.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the manager’s role in productivity challenges for banks
  • Identify the three elements of productivity
  • Pinpoint the production problems in problem in everyday scenarios
  • Identify obstacles that are keeping work groups from reaching optimal performance levels
  • Determine the best method to identify potential productivity obstacles through the use of interviewing, fishbone diagrams and flow charts
  • Use rating, ranking and matrix screening methods for evaluating productivity solutions
  • Describe the steps for implementing productivity solutions​ ​​

Audience: Any employee that leads a work team on a full or part-time basis.

Income Tax Planning

Explains rules for calculating the taxable income computation, using expenses as deductions regarding taxable income, and how to compute alternative minimum tax. Examines tax considerations with capital gains and losses and examples of exclusions from gross income. Describes the benefits of gifting and how to treat passive activity tax situations. Explains the advantages of tax credits, how estimated tax is calculated, and considerations for a decedent’s final tax return.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the components associated with computing income tax
  • Define gross income
  • Describe gifting techniques used to avoid or minimize income tax
  • Identify the tax-saving planning options available for your clients

​Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Incident Management and Resilience

Provides an overview of the risk considerations related to an organization’s ability to plan for and recover from events that could have negative effects on its ability to continue offering products and services. Also includes a perspective on the current regulatory expectations.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the scope of an Incident Management and Resilience program
  • Explain the current regulatory environment
  • Describe roles and responsibilities across the organization
  • How to assess and prioritize risks
  • How to develop and test a continuity plan

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.

Individual Retirement Accounts

Participants will learn the eligibility requirements and contribution limits for IRAs, such as, procedures, forms & disclosure requirements for opening different IRAs, advantages and disadvantages of each type of IRA, like tax deductibility requirements of IRA contributions, rollover contribution types, allowable distribution options, and tax consequences for premature distributions.

Audience: Anyone who answers customer inquiries about IRAs, and handles IRA transactions, including personal bankers, customer service representatives and mangers.

Individual Retirement Accounts Overview

Participants will learn the five types of retirement plans and the basic steps to opening and servicing IRAs. They will learn the eligibility and allowable contributions to IRA’s, the types of contributions to and distributions from IRAs, deductibility of contributions, excess contributions, as well as reconversions, documentation, and recharacterizations.

Audience: Tellers, customer service representatives, account counselors, and anyone seeking an introductory level course and IRAs.

Information Security and Red Flags

Explains how to protect identifiable information from unauthorized access through cybersecurity attacks. Explains how banks can ensure secure remote access is controlled and enforced, and ways to handle information security breaches. Provides approaches to avoid falling victim to social engineering and identity theft.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the intent of information security laws and types of protected information
  • Describe guidelines for protecting information through security measures
  • Recognize identity theft and develop an identity theft program

Audience: All bank employees.

Insurance of Accounts

Participants will be givens examples of insurance classifications, insurance coverage requirements by accounts and ownership, federal insurance coverage and mergers. They will learn basic concepts of FDIC regulations, the purpose and functions of FDIC, ownership category account types and deposit simplification.

Audience: Accounts personnel, tellers, supervisors, savings officers, retail banking managers, trust officers, retirement account representatives and anyone else who needs to know the latest deposit insurance regulations.

International Private Banking

This course provides instruction into the theoretical, legal and practical aspects of International Private Banking. The major emphasis of this course is to focus on current critical issues impacting the International Private Banking efforts of both US and International banking entities.

Intro to Banking

This course is an introduction to the financial services industry in the United States. It covers the history and characteristics of depository institutions – banks, savings organizations, and credit unions. Users also learn about different non-depository institutions including insurance companies, stockbrokers, financial companies, and mortgage bankers. The course provides details of the regulatory structure of both depository and non-depository institutions. The course also explores the check payment system in the United States. Below is a list of topics covered in this online course: Introduction to U.S. Financial Services; Depository Institutions; Non-Depository Institutions; Financial Institution Regulatory Structure; and The Payment System.

Audience: Ideal for those just beginning their career in the banking industry.

Introduction to Agricultural Lending

will provide participants with the basic skills needed to begin to undertake credit analysis, loan structuring, and monitoring, as well as provide guidance on dealing with problem loans for agricultural customers. This course was developed in conjunction with the Schools of Banking, Inc., a jointly-owned subsidiary of the Kansas and Nebraska Bankers Associations.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize the key financial statements as recommended by the Farm Financial Standards Council (FFSC)
  • Describe the importance of accurate accounting for farm and non-farm assets, liabilities, income and expenses
  • Identify differences between cash and accrual financial statements during the loan analysis and decision making processes
  • Explain the correlation between financial ratios and bank loan policies and risk assessments

Audience: Those new to agricultural lending or with limited experience.

Introduction to Analyzing Financial Statements

Introduction to Analyzing Financial Statements presents the tools needed to analyze financial statements with confidence. This course reviews the importance of analyzing financial statements in the small business lending process, and teaches the terms and steps associated with analyzing financial statements, including the income statement, the balance sheet and the cash flow statement. This course also provides a better picture of what is required in analyzing financial statements, and to know how to explain the interpretations of the financial information.

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define financial statement analysis and explain its importance in the small business lending process
  • List the basic steps of financial statement analysis and the purpose of each step
  • Analyze an income statement and balance sheet
  • Calculate and interpret key ratios
  • Perform a simple cash flow analysis

Audience: Bank personnel who are responsible for reviewing financial statements for the purpose of assisting in making lending decisions, monitoring the ongoing health of the business, or conducting the initial financial analysis.

Introduction to Analyzing Financial Statements

  • Different types of financial statements (internal vs. audit)
  • How to analyze the financial capacity of business and personal customers
  • How to review financial statements to obtain the customer real income generation abilities
  • Assess the client’s liquidity and cash at hand
  • Review the details and the analysis of K-1 tax statements and the importance on determining beneficial owners
  • Review the concept of inter-company loans and transactions.
  • Review of a consolidating financial statements to assess inter-company transactions
  • Review and teach the importance of financial statement footnotes especially those that are more relevant
  • Understanding the limitations of the timing of financial statements when compared to BSA transaction alerts
  • Discussion of importance of tax return in the assessment of source of wealth and beneficial owners
  • Discussion of the major sections of tax returns that are relevant to BSA staff
  • Private investment companies and financial reporting
  • Difference between federal and state tax returns
  • Private investment companies and financial reporting
  • The use of financial statements as a resource to validate the Customer’s identity and source of wealth
  • Inbound/Outbound risks associated with loan advances and repayments
  • CIP for parties in a loan transaction and challenges when validating identities. OFAC screening
  • The importance of CDD in Borrowers, Co-Borrowers and guarantors
  • Issues regarding formal empowerment in loan negotiations and closings

Audience: BSA & Compliance Staff

Introduction to Estate Planning

This course explains some of the details, including fiduciary income and transfer taxes.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define basic terms
  • Explain how trusts are taxed
  • Calculate distributable net income
  • Minimize transfer taxes
  • Calculate gift, estate, and generation-skipping transfer taxes
  • Describe why estate planning is important
  • Identify considerations when developing an estate plan

Audience: Trust department and other bank staff who are new to the trust business and want to develop a basic working knowledge of trust administration. No prior knowledge of the subject is required.

Introduction to Financial Planning Products

This course focuses on the need for financial planning, and the various products and services for financial planning offered through retail banking.

Audience: Staff who sell or refer products and services.

Introduction to Investment Management

Trusts have to be managed, and trust investments do, too. This course explains the issues affecting investment management, including how to define and select from the available options and how to anticipate the impact of outside economic and legal influences.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the types of investments used in trusts that fall within these categories: cash and liquid, fixed income, equity, mutual fund, and other investments
  • Describe the methods used to select and analyze stock and bond investments
  • Explain the mechanics of portfolio management
  • Identify key client information to help clients determine investment portfolio considerations
  • Describe economic influences regarding trust investments, including the Federal Reserve, business cycles, and economic indicators
  • Explain the legal considerations that affect actions regarding trust investments

Audience​​​: Trust department and other bank staff who are new to the trust business and want to develop a basic working knowledge of trust administration. No prior knowledge of the subject is required.

Introduction to Mortgage Lending

An overview of the mortgage lending process, including mortgage programs and financing options, compliance regulations, mortgage origination, the appraisal process, loan servicing, and mortgage fraud and prevention. Also covered are real estate law and the government’s involvement in real estate, including recent CFPB rules from the Dodd-Frank Act impacting mortgage origination and servicing.

Learning Objectives

After successfully completing this program, you will be able to:

  • Explain how property is transferred from one owner to another, and the legal implications of the transfer of property
  • Describe the basic principles involved in real estate investment and finance
  • Identify the principle federal laws that apply to mortgage origination and servicing, as well as the government agencies and government-sponsored agencies that interact to further home ownership
  • Describe the process of mortgage origination, processing, underwriting, closing, and servicing, including the functions and responsibilities of the mortgage origination and loan servicing departments
  • Explain the business of construction and development lending

Audience: Financial service professionals who want a broad overview of mortgage lending including those who intend to pursue a career in mortgage lending (business development, underwriting, processing) and those individuals who recently joined a mortgage lending department. This course requires proctored exams.

Introduction to Planning for Retirement Assets

Focuses on the planning aspects of various retirement plans. Explains the tax treatment of qualified plan benefits for taxation, the methods and requirements for distributing retirement resources in a timely and tax-effective manner, the impact on the estate plan of naming various beneficiaries on an IRA, and the post mortem payout requirements of qualified plans

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the common qualified retirement plans – their features and benefits
  • Explain the favorable tax treatment of qualified retirement plans and common related administrative issues

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Introduction to Relationship Selling

This course explores the Relationship Selling Process, focusing on techniques to prepare for the first encounter with a new client; using verbal and nonverbal communication and open and closed questions and listening skills, presenting products and solutions and handling client objections, selling against the competition, and closing the sale.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the six step relationship selling process and how it relates to meeting your client’s expectations
  • Determine how to plan for the success of your sales interaction
  • Take action to set a relaxing, positive, and professional sales climate and establish credibility with your client
  • Determine how to uncover your client’s needs by evaluating their situation
  • Ensure client satisfaction through the suggestion of appropriate products and solutions to meet their needs
  • Identify how to appropriately respond to client objections and concerns
  • Determine actions to close and follow up with a client

Audience: Bank personnel who are involved in sales activities in a retail-banking environment.

Introduction to Trust Administration

If you are new to trust administration, this course can take you from basic vocabulary, through the requirements to create a trust, account acceptance and discretionary distributions, right up to termination.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain how property ownership impacts trusts
  • Explain basic trust concepts and terminology
  • Discuss personal trusts
  • Describe account acceptance and termination procedures
  • Explain the considerations for discretionary distributions

Audience: Trust department and other bank staff who are new to the trust business and want to develop a basic working knowledge of trust administration. No prior knowledge of the subject is required.

Introduction to Trust Products and Services

This course teaches the basic skills and building blocks in preparation for understanding wills and the probate process, administration of a probate estate, how trusts are formed and operate, the mechanics of a trust document, and basic administrative duties of a trustee.

This course is the recommended prerequisite for Basic Administrative Duties of a Trustee.

Learning Objectives

This course develops knowledge pertaining to:

  • Types of assets and forms of property ownership
  • Principles of estate planning and estate taxation
  • Personal agencies and profiling an investment program
  • Guardianships and advance directives

Audience: Those employees who have recently joined the trust department in support positions, non-trust personnel within the bank who work with trust officers and trust clients, as well as employees of service providers to trust companies who want to develop a better understanding of their clients’ business needs.

Investment Policy

Explains how a basic investment policy statement answers questions about client objectives, return expectations, risk tolerance, time horizon, and portfolio allocation. Explains how investment constraints affect how a portfolio will be constructed and managed, and why they must be identified in the investment policy.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe investment policies
  • Describe common investment constraints

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Investment Products

Explains how knowing the investment products found in the equity and debt markets improve the ability to talk to clients about their stock portfolios. Identifies the characteristics of common stock and preferred stock. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of mutual funds and how to distinguish between open-end funds and closed-end funds.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe investment products commonly found in the equity market
  • Describe investment products commonly found in the debt market
  • Describe the characteristics of mutual funds​​​

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Investments I

Investments I focuses on an overall discussion of investment risk, organization of the investment decision process, regulatory influences for investments and the similarities and differences of commingled funds and mutual funds investments.

Audience: Trust professionals looking for a big-picture view of investments and investment planning concepts. This course is appropriate for Trust Officers who have already achieved a basic level of knowledge and expertise in the trust field.

Investments II

This course builds on the earlier investments course and focuses on the concepts used in valuing investments, the characteristics of different types of securities markets, and factors to consider in mutual fund selection.

Audience: Trust professionals looking for a big-picture view of investments and investment planning concepts. This course is appropriate for Trust Officers who have already achieved a basic level of knowledge and expertise in the trust field.

IRA Online Institute

An intensive 12-week course developed and supported by Ascensus’ professional instructors that teaches in-depth, essential IRA information on Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, SEP plans and SIMPLE IRA plans. Ascensus has tailored its premier on-site IRA training to include web-based study materials and assignment submissions.

Learning Objectives

  • Administer traditional and Roth IRAs, as well as SEP and SIMPLE plans
  • Identify eligibility requirements, handle contributions, distributions and set-up requirements for traditional and Roth IRAs, as well as SEP and SIMPLE plans
  • Understand and manage rollovers, transfers and required minimum distributions
  • Describe beneficiary options and facilitate beneficiary transactions

Audience: This course is intended for IRA Services Professionals with one to two years’ experience or for those preparing for the CISP exam.

Law and Banking: Applications

A deep dive into how specific laws and regulations apply to financial services and products. The course covers the laws and regulations that govern deposit accounts, lending, bankruptcy, trusts, non-deposit products and services, international banking, marketing, safety and soundness, and information security and reporting.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the laws and regulations that protect bank deposits and govern the relationship between a bank and its depositors
  • Identify the laws and regulations affecting banks and protecting borrowers when banks offer credit products
  • Identify the bank safety and soundness laws that help protect bank assets, guard against deposit insurance system losses, and reduce risk in the banking system
  • Explain the provisions of bankruptcy law and its protection of the interests of both debtors and creditors , including asset liquidation and reorganization
  • Explain some of the information safeguarding requirements placed on banks when receiving, using, and disclosing customer information

Audience: Personnel who are new to banking or require a refresher course on the legal basis for many banking services and transactions. This course requires proctored exam.

Note: With the Commercial Lending, Consumer Lending, and Mortgage Lending diplomas, you may choose either Law and Banking

Law and Banking: Principles

An overview of the laws and regulations that affect how financial services companies operate on a daily basis. The course weaves business and banking law principles together to show regulations’ effects on financial services activities.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the legal and legislative sources of U.S. banking law and the judiciary’s and regulatory agencies’ roles in interpreting the law
  • Identify the types of customer, both individuals and legal entities, that a financial services company transacts with and the obligations and responsibilities associated with the relationships
  • Describe the various legal challenges facing financial institutions such as torts, crimes, contractual issues, and property issues
  • Describe the requirements of negotiable instruments under the UCC and other laws and the rights and responsibilities of parties negotiating the instruments
  • Explain the legal obligations of banks to act fair and responsibly as businesses and in their dealings with customers

Audience: Personnel who are new to banking or require a refresher course on the legal basis for many banking laws governing products, services and transaction. This course requires proctored exam.

Note: With the Commercial Lending, Consumer Lending, and Mortgage Lending diplomas, you may choose either Law and Banking course to satisfy the requirement. The second of the two courses could then be applied as an elective, if you desired a more comprehensive knowledge of banking law.

Leading your People to Success Blue Program

This course covers the skill of leadership needed by today’s supervisors. It discusses how supervisors can use proven techniques to empower their employees and understand all the requirements to be The Complete Supervisor. Participants will learn how to develop team-building skills, handle group dynamics, coach and counsel employees, give productive performance appraisals, and support career development of their employees, in order to crate a high-opportunity work environment.

Audience: New or experienced supervisors and first-line managers or those preparing for such a role.

Lending: Introductory

This workshop is designed to help students comprehend some of the basic concepts of the lending process. It will include methods of conversing and negotiating with a customer during the interview/application process, analyze the application and support documentation, learn loan documentation and closing, and manage the loan until its maturity.

Letters of Credit

This seminar is designed to help participants understand the technical and practical aspects of Letters of Credit.

Audience: International banking and commercial credit personnel, branch managers, management trainees, accounting officers, and others involved in international trade and managing international accounts.

Leveraging LinkedIn

LinkedIn plays an important role in how you are perceived professionally. Learn how to leverage this high-traffic destination with a LinkedIn profile that truly reflects your professional brand and allows you to connect with prospects and customers.

Modules:

  • Stand Out: Build a Powerful Profile
  • Connect: Grow Your Network
  • Tune In: Keep Up in a Busy World
  • Share: Be a Thought Leader
  • Reach Out: Promote Your Brand

What You’ll Learn

  • Explain the best practices for creating accounts and content
  • Identify strategies to connect with prospects, customers, and other professionals
  • Leverage LinkedIn as a tool to stay informed
  • Identify thought leadership strategies
  • Identify approaches to extend branch reach and increase audience engagement

Audience: Any bank employee who uses LinkedIn to promote the bank’s brand, products, and services.

Leveraging the Benefits of a Diverse Workforce

Includes real-life scenarios to illustrate how to manage diversity issues by explaining the skills needed and apply the five-step process for handling conflict resolutions. Provides strategies for successful managers to recruit diverse work teams, encourage diversity of thought, and welcome differing opinions. Describes potential solutions to discourage stereotyping and encourage diversity.

Life Insurance and Annuities

This course enhances the Trust Officer’s value to clients as a credible source of insurance information. Participants will learn about life insurance and annuity products, review related policy issues and fiduciary responsibilities, and explore the uses of these products in serving clients’ financial- and estate-planning needs.

Audience: Trust Officers who already have achieved a basic level of knowledge and expertise in the trust field.

Loans to Executive Officers (Reg O): This course reviews the basic requirements of Regulation O and provides guidance on the general prohibitions of extending credit to insiders. This course also addresses recordkeeping and reporting requirements, and discusses specific duties for directors to ensure that your financial institution will conduct its insider activities in a safe and sound manner.

Loan Structuring, Documentation, Pricing and Problem Loans

 Guidance on loan structuring and documentation issues in response to the quantitative and qualitative risk analysis. An overview of documents, loan agreements and covenants, as well as negotiating and pricing is included.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

The courses included in Loan Structuring, Documentation, Pricing and Problem Loans and their objectives are listed below:

Commercial Loan Structuring

  • Identify borrowing structures and describe their advantages
  • Explain the purpose of commercial loan support

Identifying Viable Secondary and Tertiary Sources of Repayment

  • Identify sources of repayment that are appropriate for various commercial loan borrowing arrangements and the factors that affect collateral value
  • Explain key issues for assessing various types of collateral commonly used for commercial loans 

Key Documents, Loan Agreements and Covenants

  • Describe the loan documentation process and requirements
  • Explain the best practices for loan closing—preparing, conducting, and following up

Loan Pricing and Negotiating

  • Describe pricing considerations for a commercial loan
  • Identify and explain the loan negotiation process
  • Explain the role of the business banker in the loan negotiation

Problem Loans

  • Identify the costs and causes of problem loans
  • Detect problem loan warning signs
  • Explain the steps in resolving a problem loan
  • Describe the solutions to problem loans—rehabilitation, liquidation, and bankruptcy

Audience: Commercial and/or Business bankers and Credit Analysts

Loans to Insiders (Reg O) for Compliance Professionals

 Provides a way to obtain a strong knowledge of Regulation O, which governs loans that a bank makes to its insiders (i.e., executive officers, directors, principal shareholders and their related interests). Describes who the regulation applies to, the manner in which its provisions apply to various insiders, and the records that must be maintained.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify parties and transactions covered under Regulation O
  • Describe basic restrictions and limitations under Regulation O
  • Explain the reporting and recordkeeping requirements of Regulation O

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Managing Change

The effects that change events can have on individuals and organizations and explores leadership strategies for managing change are covered. Through the effective use of a four-step change communication process, students will learn to better manage the impact of change, identify reactions to change and address them effectively.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Distinguish between change and transition
  • Identify seven typical effects of change
  • Describe the primary reactions employees have to change events
  • Examine the three stages of change
  • Identify possible reactions to each stage of change
  • Identify the seven strategies to demonstrate change leadership
  • Identify the influence and action you can take in change situations
  • Describe the key elements of effective communication
  • Identify the four steps to communicating change effectively
  • Describe the impact of the four-step communication approach on a change event

Audience: Any employee who is leading a group in a changing environment.

Managing Employee Performance (Performance Management)

A proactive approach to manage performance by leveraging the three stages in the Performance Management Cycle. The importance of ensuring employees clearly understand specific tasks they must accomplish, evaluating their progress, and providing constructive and timely feedback towards the accomplishment of their performance objectives are covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the stages of the Performance Management Cycle
  • Write clear, concise performance objectives
  • Communicate expectations and monitor employee progress
  • Provide timely formal and informal employee feedback
  • Write fair effective performance evaluations

Audience: Any supervisor or manager who has responsibility for direction, documenting and evaluating employee performance.

Managing Employee Relations (Managing Employee Engagement)

Preparation for managers, including the challenges of managing employees in the contemporary workplace and a four-step strategy for managing employee relations – compliance with legislation, managing diversity, handling work and personal issues, and fostering open communication.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of a manager’s role in establishing and maintaining sound employee relations in an organization
  • Identify four management strategies that support positive employee relations
  • Describe the purpose and intent of employment legislation governing workplace supervision
  • Identify diversity issues in a team and overcome related barriers to productive employee relations
  • Use effective guidelines for handling work and personal issues in a team
  • Implement management activities that facilitate open communications

Audience: Any manager or team leader with one or more reporting relationships.

Managing Funding, Liquidity and Capital

A summary of the bank funding types, liquidity issues and management of capital. Learn what funding is used by banks; how liquidity needs may be addressed by storing liquidity on the balance sheet or by securing additional funding; and bank capital’s purpose, regulatory requirements and the effect on profitability.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the risk/return characteristics and costs of various funding sources
  • Evaluate the effect of various funding sources on interest rate and liquidity risk
  • Describe various measures used to manage liquidity
  • Recognize the merits of both regulators’ and shareholders’ points of view regarding optimal capital levels
  • Prepare a capital management plan

Prerequisites:
Participants should have a basic understanding of bank financial statements, bank performance analysis, and interest rate risk management. Students who have not had exposure to these topics are encouraged (but not required) to take Analyzing Bank Performance and Managing Interest Rate Risk prior to this class.

Audience: This course is designed for individuals involved in funding, liquidity, or capital management, or line managers making pricing, investment, or funding decisions that impact these areas.

Managing Interest Rate Risk

An exploration of interest rate risk measurement techniques such as GAP, earnings sensitivity analysis, Duration GAP and economic value of equity sensitivity analysis. Risk management policy implementation and how to change overall interest rate sensitivity through balance sheet adjustments or derivative contracts are discussed.

Learning Objectives

  • Apply the mechanics of valuing cash flows including duration and price sensitivity
  • Identify the determinants of the overall level of interest rates
  • Use static GAP, duration GAP and sensitivity analysis to measure interest rate risk
  • Examine how derivatives–futures, forwards, interest rate swaps, caps, floors and collars–are used to manage interest rate risk
  • Apply course concepts to the management of interest rate risk within your bank​​​​​​​​

Prerequisites:
Participants should have a understanding of financial instruments, financial markets, and interest rate mechanics either through the Analyzing Bank Performance course or experience. This is a difficult course that covers a number of complex concepts and requires an ability to deal with a variety of mathematical concepts and computations.

Audience: Managing Interest Rate Risk is a rigorous course designed for individuals involved in asset liability management or line managers making pricing, investment, or funding decisions that impact interest rate risk.

Managing Investment Portfolios

This easy-to-use, computer-based software course is perfect for understanding and implementing sound management of the bank’s investment portfolio. Topics include: fixed income prices and yields; interest rates and the yield curve analysis; securities in a bank’s investment portfolio; mortgage backed securities; and, an extended section on portfolio management including setting objectives, policy and strategy. The course is set-up in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step format for best results by the user. Below is a list of topics that will be covered: Bank Investment Portfolio; Fixed Income Overview; Interest Rate & Yield Curve Analysis; Mortgage Backed Securities and the Secondary Mortgage Market; and Portfolio Management Strategies

Audience: Any bank personnel involved in any aspect of the bond portfolio, all accounting personnel, any lending officer or office manager who needs to broaden their exposure to other areas of the bank, and internal auditors.

Managing Life Insurance Policies

Describes the use of life insurance as a financial tool.  It explains how to determine if a cash value policy is right for a client, and discusses the appropriate use of policy illustrations. This course also outlines how to manage the death benefit option in a universal life policy, and the type of expenses associated with variable universal life policies. This course describes how wealth accumulates in variable universal life policies.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the responsibilities a fiduciary needs to consider when managing life insurance
  • Describe the management of universal life policies including expenses and wealth accumulation
  • Explain the expenses associated with life insurance policies and how contracts are funded

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Managing Performance & Productivity White Program

This course covers the management principles need y today’s supervisors. It discusses how supervisors can use processes and systems to encourage maximum productivity of their employees. Participants will learn how to use an effective interview process to select the best candidate, how to use the mentor system and techniques for training employees, how to establish expectations and measure productivity and performance, and learn work simplification and time management skills. Also, they will learn to use technology to improve productivity, manage meetings and give presentations, and use problem-solving tools to reach results.

Audience: New or experienced supervisors and first-line managers or those preparing for such a role.

Managing Stress

Understand stress and its symptoms in the workplace. Find out about the stages of stress and learn strategies you can use for managing stress.

Managing the Bank’s Investment Portfolio

 This course provides the fundamentals for understanding how a bank’s investment portfolio is managed. Objectives and composition of investment portfolios, and common bank investments are covered, focusing on their risk and return profiles. Various investment strategies are described and the development of bank investment policies is discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key characteristics and calculate the return of common investment instruments
  • Describe regulatory and accounting restrictions on bank investment portfolios
  • Identify important elements of a bank’s investment policy and formulate an example policy
  • Compare the benefits and risk of various investment strategies
  • Evaluate the return on taxable and tax-exempt securities and instruments with prepayment risk

Audience: This course is designed for individuals involved in managing the bank’s investment portfolio.

Managing Time at Work

This course provides participants with the understanding and skills necessary to effectively manage their time on the job. They focus on how to organize and prioritize daily tasks, manage workflow, develop a daily plan, manage interruptions, and manage computer information.

Audience: Bank personnel who are not currently using an organized method to plan and manage their time, or those who want a refresher.

Managing Trust Accounts

The Managing Trust Accounts course introduces you to the basic principles of establishing trust accounts and managing receipts and payments for these trusts. It covers the procedures for accepting new accounts, as well as dealing with changes in accounts impacted by disclaimers, and explains the rules needed to apply the Uniform Principal and Income Act when allocating receipts and payments.

Audience: Trust Officers who have already achieved a basic level of knowledge and expertise in the trust field.

Marketing Financial Services (Marketing for Bankers)

This course identifies all the factors that influence customers to purchase financial services. It explores the stages in the marketing planning process and the four elements of the marketing mix as applied to marketing bank services. Participants will learn to recognize consumer motivation and buying behavior, identify key issues relating to banking products and will review strategies for the pricing, promotion and distribution of bank services. The course will prepare you to conduct situation analysis, formulate a master marketing strategy, and to integrate public relations, advertising, sales promotion, selling, and service distribution functions into your bank’s overall marketing plan.

Audience: All bank personnel responsible for conceiving or carrying out any phase of a bank’s marketing efforts, including bank personnel in customer-contact and operations positions, management trainees, and persons entering banking at the mid-management level.

Marketing in a Digital World

Marketing in a Digital World, a six-course series, shows you how to break through the noise and reach your target audiences. You’ll learn to leverage Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to expand your reach and build your bank’s brand. You’ll explore the latest strategies for crafting digital campaigns, including optimizing for search and which paid options can best engage your target audiences. Examples of successful campaigns by other financial institutions make it easy to put your ideas into action.

Courses

  • Social Campaigns
    • The Power of Facebook
    • Leveraging LinkedIn
    • Strategic Twitter
  • Digital Campaigns​
    • Search Engine Optimization
    • Build Your Campaign
    • Find Your Audience

Audience: Marketing professionals.

Marketing in a Digital World: Digital Campaigns

Marketing in a Digital World: Digital Campaigns is a three-course series that shows you what digital advertising is and why it’s an important component of your bank’s marketing strategy. You’ll uncover the role of search engine optimization (SEO) in getting seen by customers, and see why marketing on mobile devices deserves special considerations.

Bonus Material includes an introduction to digital marketing approaches and examples of digital marketing in action.

Courses

  • Search Engine Optimization
  • Build Your Campaign
  • Find Your Audience

Audience: Marketing professionals.

Marketing in a Digital World: Social Campaigns

In Marketing in a Digital World: Social Campaigns, a three-course series, you’ll learn how to expand your reach and build your brand using Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. You’ll see why social networks must be part of an integrated marketing strategy to share your bank’s story, connect with customers and prospects, and build brand loyalty.

Bonus material includes an introduction to social marketing approaches and case studies to help you put campaigns into action.

Courses

  • The Power of Facebook
  • Leveraging LinkedIn
  • Strategic Twitter

Audience: Marketing professionals and any bank employee who uses Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter to promote the bank’s brand, products, and services.

Meetings That Work

This seminar focuses on how to effectively lead meetings and use them as productive methods to communicate, solve problems and make decisions. It covers the appropriate reasons for holding meetings, the characteristics and typical structure of meetings, principles and tools for planning, leading and participating in meetings and how to handle distracting problem behaviors. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: describe the benefits of effective group meetings for organizations and individual group members; identify appropriate reasons for holding a meeting; list the characteristics of effective meetings; complete key meeting planning and preparation activities; and apply effective principles to lead and participate in effective meetings. Note: This course does not cover formal presentation skills and techniques.

Audience: Anyone who leads or participates in meetings within or outside their organization.

Microsoft Access 2007: Level 1

Microsoft Access 2007: Level 1 is designed for students who wish to learn the basic operations of the Microsoft Access database application to perform their day-to-day responsibilities, and to understand the advantages that using a relational database application can bring to their business processes.
This course covers the following topics: Examining the basic database concepts, Creating and modifying databases and its various objects, Designing new databases, tables, and relationships, Creating and maintaining records, Producing reports based on the information in the database.

Microsoft Access 2007: Level 2

Microsoft Access 2007: Level 2 is for users who need to maintain data consistency, customize database components, and share Access data with other applications.
This course covers the following topics:
Maintaining data integrity, Handling complex queries, forms, and reports, Sharing data between Access and other applications.

Microsoft Excel 2007: Level 1

Microsoft Excel 2007: Level 1 is designed for people who already have knowledge of Microsoft® Office, Windows® 2000 (or above), and who desire to gain the skills necessary to create, edit, format, and print basic Microsoft Office Excel 2007 worksheets.
This course covers the following topics: Migrating your spreadsheet data to an electronic format, Formatting and editing data.

Microsoft Excel 2007: Level 2

Microsoft Excel 2007: Level 2 is for students who already have the basic knowledge of Excel, including how to create, edit, format, and print basic worksheets. This course covers the following topics: Streamlining and enhancing your spreadsheets using templates, charts, graphics, and formulas, Gaining the skills necessary to create templates, Sorting and filtering data, Importing, exporting and analyzing data, and Working with Excel on the web.

Microsoft Excel 2007: Level 3

Microsoft Excel 2007: Level 3 is for students desiring to gain the skills necessary to create macros, audit and analyze worksheet data, incorporate multiple data sources, and import and export data.
This course covers the following topics: Running calculations, Sorting and filtering numeric data, Automating common tasks, Applying advanced analysis techniques to more complex data sets, Collaborating on worksheets with others, and Sharing Excel data with other applications.

Microsoft Outlook 2007: Level 1

Microsoft Outlook 2007: Level 1 is intended for the beginner student that has no previous experience using Outlook.
This course covers the following topics: Composing and sending email, Scheduling appointments and meetings, Managing contact information and tasks, and Using notes.

Microsoft Access 2007: Level 2

Microsoft Access 2007: Level 2 is for users who need to maintain data consistency, customize database components, and share Access data with other applications.
This course covers the following topics: Maintaining data integrity, Handling complex queries, forms, and reports, and Sharing data between Access and other applications.

Microsoft Outlook 2007: Level 3

Microsoft Outlook 2007: Level 3 is intended for intermediate Outlook users needing additional functionality.
This course covers the following topics: Personalizing email, Organizing and managing items, including data files, Sharing and linking contacts, how to save and archive mail, Creating forms, and Working offline and remotely.

Microsoft PowerPoint 2007: Level 1

Microsoft PowerPoint 2007: Level 1 is designed for students who are interested in learning the fundamentals needed to create and modify basic electronic presentations.
This course covers the following topics: Beginning a presentation, Formatting text slides, including tables, objects and images, Charting data, and Delivering a presentation.

Microsoft PowerPoint 2007: Level 2

Microsoft PowerPoint 2007: Level 2 is designed for students who already have knowledge of the basics of PowerPoint 2007, including slide formatting and working with tables, charts, images, objects, and presentation preparation.
This course covers the following topics: Working with design templates and various types of diagrams, Creating special effects, and custom slide shows and Advanced presentation delivery.

Microsoft Word 2007: Level 1

Microsoft Word 2007: Level 1 is intended for individuals who want to gain basic knowledge of working on Word.
This course covers the following topics: Creating and editing a basic document, Formatting documents, text, and paragraphs, Adding tables and graphic elements and controlling page appearance.

Microsoft Word 2007: Level 2

Microsoft Word 2007: Level 2 was designed for persons who can create and modify standard business documents, and who need to learn how to create or modify complex business documents, as well as customized Word efficiency tools.
This course covers the following topics: Creating customized efficiency tools, Adding customized lists, tables, charts, and graphics and Producing high-quality, effective, sophisticated documents.

Microsoft Word 2007: Level 3

Microsoft Word 2007: Level 3 is designed for persons who want to gain skills necessary to manage long documents, collaborate with others, and secure documents.
This course covers the following topics: Create and format complex business documents, Managing and revising long documents and Distributing forms.

Military Lending Act

Covers the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Military Lending Act (MLA). Explains how the regulation imposes strict requirements on covered loans made to military personnel and their families. Discusses the expanded coverage of the MLA, its numerous restrictions and requirements, determination of military status, and the penalties for noncompliance.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the background and purpose of the MLA rule 
  • Define key terminology in the MLA rule
  • Identify a covered borrower 
  • Explain prohibited terms in covered loans made to military personnel and their spouses and dependents
  • Identify the disclosures covered borrowers must receive under the MLA
  • Identify the penalties for non-compliance

Audience: Any staff that takes consumer loan applications and consumer lending staff including underwriters.

Minimizing Fiduciary Risk and Litigation

Outlines risks associated with participation in the estate planning process, asset management, and fiduciary liability to third parties, and ways to mitigate risk in all situations. Describes ways to mitigate risks of self-dealing and prohibited transactions, and explores the risks associated with notice to beneficiaries and accounting and discretionary distributions.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify general types of trust litigation
  • Describe situations that may contribute to risk exposure and ways to mitigate the risk

​Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.​​

Money and Banking (Recommended prerequisite: Economics for Bankers)

This course presents a fundamental treatment of how money functions in the U.S. and world economies. Topics include the concept of money supply and the role your bank plays as a money creator and participant in the nation’s payment mechanism. Money and Banking also explains how the various types of financial institutions operate, the workings of monetary and fiscal policies, the functions and powers of the Federal Reserve, and more.

Audience: Bank personnel who have not had a formal course in money and banking and who wish to increase their understanding of the banking industry; officer trainees through the mid-management level.

Morale and Motivating Your Staff

A workplace with high morale often is characterized by employees that are happy to go the extra mile when interacting with the customer or when performing job duties and tasks. Financial institutions that strive for impressive profitability and productivity must learn how to create a positive environment where employees are fired up about what they do and where they work.

Reduce the signs of low morale including high employee turnover, low productivity, coworker conflict, increased absenteeism, doing just enough to get by, and a reluctance or lack of enthusiasm to take on additional duties, training, or volunteering for more responsibilities.

Motivation is an internal component all human beings have but it must be encouraged and challenged. The manager’s job is to create an environment that brings out the best in the staff and in turn the staff brings their best to the job.

You will leave this webinar knowing how to foster and sustain high employee morale and generate positive employee motivation.

What You Will Learn:
• Creating an Environment that Sparks Motivation
• Establishing Teamwork
• Coaching Self-Management and Self-Evaluation
• Encouraging Follow the Leader
• Getting a Read on Morale
• Elevating Employee Morale
• Understanding the Keys to Motivation
• Implementing Ten Steps that Foster Motivation

Audience: Head Tellers, Teller Supervisors, Branch Managers, Operations Managers, Retail Managers and Trainers will all benefit from this seminar. Anyone who oversees, and supervises employees will benefit from this seminar.

 

Motivating Your Staff

The concepts in this Motivating Your Staff course are meant to help create a work environment where people are empowered and inspired to excel.  There are simple ways to identify and remove the complications that make it difficult to do a good job and every supervisor or manager can learn them.  Motivating Your Staff explains what people want most in their jobs and shows how to create the conditions to give it to them and reap the benefits of a better and more productive workplace.  It really isn’t hard to help people succeed, and this course will show you that people succeeding is the most powerful tool for increasing productivity and motivation.

Mutual Funds – An Introduction

A mutual fund is an investment that pools together money from many investors and invests it in stocks, bonds, or other securities. It offers investors a relatively easy and efficient means of accessing the capital markets, and is easily the most popular type of investment. This course looks at the fundamentals of mutual funds, describing their basic structure and regulation, pricing and performance measures.

Mutual Funds – Investing

To many clients, ‘investing’ simply means buying mutual funds. These investors buy and sell mutual fund shares through a variety of sources and for a number of different objectives. This course examines the steps investors must take in planning a mutual fund investment: identification of investment criteria, collecting information, assessment of risk, and purchasing shares. It also details the various fees and expenses associated with mutual funds and examines the tax implications of a mutual fund investment.

National Flood Insurance Regulations for Compliance Professionals

 Provides a brief history of the federal flood insurance statutes—the Homeowners Flood Insurance Affordability Act (HFIAA) and the Biggert-Waters Act (BWA)—as well as the implementing regulations, an overview of flood insurance requirements, and a discussion of enforcement.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the background and history related to the national flood insurance regulations
  • Explain the general regulatory requirements for the applicable laws and regulations

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Needs-Based Selling

Needs-Based Selling offers logical steps for selling deposit products effectively. This course teaches how to conduct sales interactions with clients, and how to prepare for effective needs-based selling to maximize sales of deposit products and ensure client satisfaction. Course exercises provide opportunities to practice needs-based selling concepts through realistic client scenarios.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of needs-based selling 
  • Describe typical bank products and their features and benefits 
  • Interpret clues and identify client needs 
  • Cross-sell deposit product solutions that match client needs 
  • Respond to questions and objections from clients 
  • Close the sale or refer the client​

Audience: Any bank personnel in a position to discuss deposit products and services with customers.

New Account Fraud

Participants will learn the applicant interview process, identification of documents and verifying information, account opening decision-making process, as well as, new account fraud types, and suspicious applicant behavior and transactions.

Audience: Tellers, customer service representatives, personnel bankers, accounts personnel, managers and anyone involved in deposit accounts.

Now You’re the Supervisor!

If you need others to take direction from you in order to succeed, you will find this program of tremendous value. The program focuses on the techniques and strategies you need in order to handle your job responsibilities successfully while at the same time increasing your personal job satisfaction.

Supervisors must master the art of juggling – staff, schedules, meetings, compliance concerns, goals that must be met, deadlines that won’t wait, on-going training needs, serving as a back-up for the employee that didn’t come in… the list goes on and on. We’ll discuss how to keep all the balls in the air without breaking a sweat.

This program will ramp up your leadership skills and address critical supervisory issues necessary to becoming an extraordinary supervisor. Covered Topics:

  • Acknowledge Your New Role – Embrace the challenge of moving from team member to supervisor. Learn the value of boundaries. Doing so will help you find balance between your need for approval and the larger need for meeting team and company goals.
  • Plan and Prioritize – Realize that your primary job is to make sure that everything that needs to get done gets done. Planning and prioritizing departmental tasks, and assigning the right tasks to the right people, is the key to everyone’s success.
  • Be Accessible – Take the time to walk around your department so you can see and hear what is going on. It’s a great way to find and take advantage of “coachable moments.” Establish routine coaching appointments with your staff to create consistent, timely accessibility.
  • Encourage Teamwork – Foster input from team members and demonstrate how the success of one benefits the entire team and positively impacts the entire organization.
  • Communicate Upward and Downward – Let your team in on the reasons behind decisions, then listen and share their input and concerns. This will ensure a happier, more productive workplace for all.
  • Delegate – Delegating not only helps you manage your workload, it helps team members develop important skills and become more self-supervising. Provide encouragement and follow-up, so team members know they have the support and resources they need.
  • Discipline Effectively – Set clear expectations. When it comes to performance concerns, be specific with team members. Let them see how their actions impact the team and the organization.

Audience: New supervisors, supervisor candidates, and those that manage and train supervisors would benefit from this program.

OFAC Sanctions: What has changed? & Overview of the New Cuba Sanctions

This seminar will cover the U.S Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) sanctions, what has changed and the new developments associated with Cuba.

You will explore the impact to financial institutions in connection with the growing concern and challenges associated with compliance and the OFAC sanctions.

 

The seminar will cover the following:

  • Why must a financial institution focus on OFAC?
  • General OFAC compliance obligations and baseline
  • Determining whether entities that are owned or controlled by blocked persons are themselves blocked persons
  • Event-driven enhanced due diligence and look-back review
  • Common mistakes and lessons learned
  • Handling penalties and voluntary self-disclosures

In addition the seminar will also cover recent changes with respect to the Cuba sanctions. OFAC has administered and enforced a series of sanctions against Cuba for decades, and just in the past 18 months, these sanctions have been reduced, allowing more transactions to be conducted.

What caused these changes?

What do these changes mean?

What is now permissible for financial institutions and other persons that are subject to OFAC regulations?

What remains in the “danger zone”?

Audience: Bank personnel who have deposit or lending responsibilities.

Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)

Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) provides key information relative to OFAC laws and regulations that are part of bank employees’ daily responsibilities. This course explains the overall purpose and background of OFAC. It provides the purpose and use of the blocked persons list, as well as the general guidelines for handling matched names and blocked funds.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the background of OFAC and the purpose of economic and trade sanctions
  • Describe who must comply with OFAC regulations
  • Describe the penalties for noncompliance
  • Describe the purpose and use of the OFAC Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List
  • Describe how to handle a matched name
  • Describe how to handle blocked or rejected transactions
  • Identify reports that must be made to the United States Treasury​

Audience: Bank personnel who have deposit or lending responsibilities.

Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) for Compliance Professionals

 Discusses the economic sanctions programs under the Office of Foreign Assets Control or OFAC, how they affect banks and the steps banks must take to comply. Explains the fundamental requirements of a compliance program and the relationship between OFAC and BSA are also covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of the Office of Foreign Assets Control and some of the OFAC laws and penalties
  • Explain who and what is covered by OFAC requirements and other related sanction programs
  • Describe elements of an OFAC bank compliance program
  • Explain how OFAC enforces sanctions compliance
  • Describe additional considerations for banks when developing a sanctions compliance program

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Operational Risk Model Management

Covers the importance of building and maintaining a strong risk model management framework and the principles of model development. Explains conducting the model validation and how to validate results. Explores types of model controls, maintaining appropriate change controls and how documentation supports an effective model risk framework.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the guidance available on model risk management and the role of the board in model risk policy and oversight
  • Describe the types of models that are covered under model risk management guidance
  • Identify areas of a financial institution where models are typically found and information that should be included in an inventory of models
  • Recognize the factors that should be considered when assessing model risk
  • Describe the principles of model development and training that should be provided prior to model implementation

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.​

Organizational Behavior

The Organizational Behavior course studies the scholarly foundations upon which the science of organizational behavior is built. You will learn how to transform business challenges into personal opportunities and organizational advantages. This course builds upon a powerful theme of change to clearly demonstrate how change not only affects attitudes and behaviors within an organization, but also offers new opportunities and experiences for those who can learn how to profit from its potential. This course addresses timeless organizational behavior topics, such as motivation, leadership, teamwork and communication, as well as some of the emerging issues shaping the field of organizational behavior today. Supporting themes focus on the challenges and opportunities within globalization, diversity, and ethics today. You learn not only the concepts and theories that help enhance the management of human behavior at work, but also learn how to practice these skills.

Oversight and Management of Operational Risk

Explains the principal roles for board of directors and senior leaders when establishing an operational risk governance program. Identifies the importance of effective challenge by the board, risk culture and appetite, three lines of defense, and methods for measuring operational losses, and definition of economic capital. Covers the criteria for key risk indicator (KRI) selection.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the principles of effective operational risk governance and the roles of the board and senior management in overseeing operational risk programs
  • Identify the elements of an effective operational risk governance program
  • Describe the three lines of defense approach and its role in establishing effective management and oversight of operational risk across the organization
  • Identify the methods used in measuring operational risk
  • Describe criteria for key risk indicator (KRI) selection and best practices in monitoring and reporting operational risk

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.

Overview of Business Entities and BSA/AML Compliance Requirements

Learning Objects:

  • Business entities legal structures
  • Review of legal issues associated to corporations, limited liability companies and partnership, soles proprietorship and foreign entities
  • Corporate documentation? What are considered essential documents?
  • Review of legal and regulatory implications in different jurisdictions: domestic and international
  • Foreign corporations doing business in the US and regulatory implications
  • Identification of beneficial owners and their role in the business structure
  • Multi-layer legal arrangements and the process of identifying decisions makers in the business entities
  • Corporate registration protocols in domestic and international jurisdictions
  • Review of the concept of “financial haven”, the risk and regulatory implications
  • Corporate entities and domestic tax returns
  • Operating entities or private investments companies (PICs): What is the risk and critical differences?
  • Review of the differences between a “shelf” and a “shell” corporation

Audience: Compliance officers

Overview of Financial Statements

This course provides an overview of small business financial statements, including IRS tax returns. It introduces the income statement and balance sheet, as well as the cash flow cycle and statements, and explains how they are used in making lending decisions and monitoring the health of a small business.

Audience: Bank personnel who are involved in any aspect of the small business lending process but who have little experience with financial statements.

Overview of Title Insurance and Real Estate Settlement Procedures

An introduction to the history of teller insurance industry. The workshop focuses on rates and regulations, title search and examination procedures, title commitment issuance, title requirement and exceptions, clearing title objections, settlement & escrow procedures, post-closing procedures, recording of documents, title policy preparation, other title products and review.

Payments and Settlements

Covers specific areas of payment and settlement risk management and effectively managing common types of issues. Addresses common challenges with exception items, closed accounts, restricted accounts, reclamations, garnishments, and seizure orders. Describes areas found to be of higher risk while managing payment returns involving various mobile channels, ACH, wires and others.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify common risks in payments and settlements
  • Describe payments and settlement risk controls and available resources
  • Describe common settlement issues and how to manage them
  • Explain guidelines for managing payment returns

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.

Physical Security

Explores elements of physical security planning and components for an effective physical security plan to improve the bank’s prevention and detection strategy. Addresses cameras, lighting, access control, security design, and vendor risk. Covers areas to review when developing a plan for insider fraud and other manmade threats, like bank robberies.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the care of duty owed to customers and employees
  • Identify the key components of physical security
  • Describe the role of the security plan and resources available to assist with establishing an emergency operations plan (EOP)
  • Identify issues to consider when planning for threats

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.

Personal Tax Return Analysis

This course explains how to analyze tax returns to determine a projected income and explores income trends, recurring versus non-recurring income, and how tax returns can be used as a sales tool. ​

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify income trends and non-recurring situations used in analysis, as well as cross-sell opportunities
  • Analyze wage and tip income including the non-cash and pre-tax benefits associated with the source of income
  • Analyze taxable and non-taxable interest and dividend income
  • Describe and calculate the source of income information on Schedule C, capital gains and losses, and limited partnership income
  • Differentiate the areas on Schedule E and calculate rental income​

Audience: Bank personnel who are in a position to use personal tax returns from clients for lending analysis

Planning for Estate Tax

This course explains types of property included in a gross estate and assets not included, estate tax rules concerning jointly owned property and transfers of property to another individual, how allowable deductions are identified and subtracted from the value of the gross estate, and an illustration and examples of estate tax calculations.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify assets that are included in the gross estate
  • Identify expenses that can be deducted from the gross estate
  • Explain how the estate tax is calculated

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Preparing the Closing Disclosure

The Preparing the Closing Disclosure course addresses the preparation of each field of the Closing Disclosure, illustrating similarities between the Closing Disclosure and the Loan Estimate, and addressing common and situational questions regarding the Closing Disclosure.

The Closing Disclosure form is required to be used on all loans that are subject to the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule for loan applications taken on or after October 3, 2015. This course will help mortgage lending personnel understand the disclosure and re-disclosure requirements as well as the information provided in each field on the form.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the requirements for the fields on each page of the Closing Disclosure​
  • Recognize the requirements for disclosure and re-disclosure

Audience: Lending operations staff, including: Compliance, Loan Originators, Underwriters, Processing, and Closing.​

Preparing the Loan Estimate

The Preparing the Loan Estimate course addresses the preparation of each field of the Loan Estimate, illustrating similarities between the Loan Estimate and the Closing Disclosure, and addressing common and situational questions regarding the Loan Estimate.

The Loan Estimate form is required to be used on all loans that are subject to the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule for loan applications taken on or after October 3, 2015. This course will help mortgage lending personnel understand the delivery and receipt requirements of the disclosure as well as the information provided in each field on the form.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize the requirements for disclosure and reissuance
  • Identify the requirements for the fields on each page of the Loan Estimate​

Audience: Lending operations staff, including: Compliance, Loan Originators, Underwriters, Processing, and  Closing.​

Presentation Skills

This workshop covers the basics of planning an organized, audience-focused oral presentation. The workshop also covers the physical aspects of presenting, such as body language, voice and gestures, handling nervousness and dealing with disruptive audience members. Participants will have the opportunity to design and deliver a presentation during the workshop and receive feedback from their peers. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will be able to: Write a purpose statement for their presentation topic; Write an opening statement that catches the audience’s attention; Identify components of a presentation that gain attention and keep interest; Describe effective uses of visual aids (flipcharts & overheads); Define and demonstrate open and closed questions; Develop a closing statement that calls the audience to action; List methods for dealing with disruptive audience members; Identify ways to control nervousness; Demonstrate appropriate body language; and Deliver a presentation that meets the need of the audience.

Audience: Any bank employee who makes stand-up, verbal presentations to schools, community groups, business prospects, staff, senior management, etc.

Principles of Banking

Long recognized as the premiere introductory course to the banking industry, Principles of banking touches on nearly every aspect of banking, from the fundamentals of negotiable instruments to contemporary issues and developments within the industry. Participants who successfully complete the course have a solid foundation of knowledge from which to build successful careers in banking.

Audience: Personnel new to banking, at any level.

Privacy/Information Sharing for Compliance Professionals

 Focusing on confidential customer information banks are allowed to gather with permissible purpose and requirements for sharing that confidential information when permitted by regulation, this course reviews the key privacy laws and the delicate balance of freedom of speech and the government’s right to mandate some information disclosure.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the prerequisites that apply to sharing nonpublic personal information (NPI) with nonaffiliated third parties and define key terms included in the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA)
  • Explain the requirements for sharing information among affiliates, and additional privacy notice requirements and considerations, including alternative delivery requirements
  • Describe the GLBA Security Guidelines and components included in an information security program and actions banks must take to properly manage and contr​ol risk, and the requirements under the Right to Financial Privacy Act for disclosure of financial institution records
  • Describe key laws and regulations that impact bank marketing strategies and how banks communicate with customers
  • Explain requirements and definitions of the FTC rule for the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), and the requirements of HIPAA/HITECH Act, including bank products provided to covered entities included under HITECH and financial institution activities that are subject to HIPAA

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Privacy for Customer Contact Personnel

Provides a broad overview of privacy laws impacting consumers, including the Right to Financial Privacy Act and the Fair Credit Reporting Act, with a deeper look at Regulation P. Discusses the privacy issues, including opt-out, consumer vs. customer and how to answer consumer questions about their privacy rights.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define privacy
  • Explain the purpose and function of three key consumer privacy laws
  • Describe the privacy rules for financial institutions

Audience: Employee with customer contact in a financial institution.​​

Private Banking & Wealth Management – An Introduction

This course looks at the fundamentals of private banking and wealth management, including the key drivers of the industry, the main market players, and the various products and services that are offered to HNW clients. The course will look at how private banking and wealth management have developed into highly profitable businesses by offering a wide range of solutions available to clients.

Private Banking & Wealth Management – Financial Planning

Financial planning is the process by which wealth managers assess their clients’ current economic situation and help them structure realistic long-term financial goals. Such planning is the foundation of successful wealth management. The plan must be vigorous enough to accomplish a client’s goals, but flexible enough to meet the client’s changing needs.

Private Banking & Wealth Management – Overview of Investing

This course looks at the fundamentals of investing and investor behavior. The content focuses on what makes investment different from speculation. This is followed by a detailed description of some of the key investor behavioral traits. The field of behavioral finance combines behavioral and cognitive psychological theory with conventional financial theory and takes into account the human tendency to behave irrationally when making investment decisions.

Private Banking & Wealth Management – Relationship Management

This course looks at how private bankers and other wealth managers maintain their business by acquiring, developing, and retaining clients. This point of contact is the relationship manager who facilitates the client’s use of the institution’s financial services and products. Client acquisition and retention is one of the main issues facing the wealth management industry today and is the focus of the course material.

Private Banking & Wealth Management – Techniques of Investing

This course explores the array of products, strategies, and fund managers clients can choose. Through indirect investment vehicles it is now easier than ever to access a wider range of asset classes. The managers of these investments can adopt an active or passive style, and there are advantages and drawbacks to both. In recent years hybrid solutions have emerged and filtered down to wealth managers to offer to their private clients. This course looks at many of these issues with a focus on the active versus fund management debate.

Problem Loan Workouts

This ABA course will explore the four major components of problem loan management. Problem Loan Detection will explore how problems loans can be avoided and how loans can be managed to make early detection possible. Problem Loan Situation Evaluation will consider what must be done to confirm the bank’s position with the borrower in preparation for negotiation with the borrower. Problem Loan Negotiation will cover the negotiation process in determining the best course of action to resolve problem loans. Problem Loan Resolution will consider alternatives of resolution and how to proceed with options for workout or liquidation.

Audience: Entry- to mid-level commercial lenders, business bankers, small business lenders, credit analysts, loan review personnel and other bank personnel interested in the subject of problem loan management and resolution.

Processing and Underwriting Credit

Unravel the information contained in credit reports, while also providing a methodology for reconciling credit and handling credit problems that may be uncovered during the analysis. Foundational lessons of processing and underwriting credit is also included.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Review information contained in a credit report more effectively
  • Recognize the characteristics of a credit report
  • Gain an effective methodology for reconciling the information within a credit report
  • Gain an effective methodology for handling credit problems
  • Distinguish how to handle identity and fraud alerts
  • Identify the characteristics of nontraditional credit
  • Differentiate the factors of credit risk analysis

Audience: Loan Processors and Underwriters.

Processing Income and Assets

A basic education of the income and asset documentation and underwriting requirements of a conforming residential mortgage loan, including tips on preparing a quality loan for submission to underwriting.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Distinguish the risk factors of a mortgage loan
  • Identify employment documentation requirements
  • Calculate stable monthly income
  • Calculate qualifying ratios
  • Calculate funds needed to close
  • Recognize documentation requirements and acceptable sources of funds

Audience: Loan processors.​

Profitable Accounts

This workshop explains the importance of determining account profitability, the profitability of each product/service your bank offers, and shows participants how to calculate it. In addition, it will help participants examine the profitability of their various customer relationships, and gather data for cross-selling/up-selling the best ones. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: Explain why it is important to determine the profitability of accounts; Describe how to determine the profitability of products/services and customer relationships; List ways to improve product and customer profitability; and Gather new account data (for new and existing customers) so that profitable accounts may be cross-sold.

Audience: All Product Managers, Office managers, Head Customer Service Representatives, and Personal Bankers whose banks have recently installed an MCIF system or are strongly considering installing one and are not familiar with how to use it effectively.

Project Management Fundamentals, Part 1

Project Management Fundamentals, Part One examines the phases of the Project Management Life Cycle, and a project manager’s role in each phase. It defines basic project success criteria and common reasons for project failure and describes techniques for setting up a strong project team and determining the elements of a Risk Management Plan.

Audience: Those with project management responsibilities or who are part of a project team.

Project Management Fundamentals, Part 2

Project Management Fundamentals, Part Two describes techniques for planning and sequencing project activities. It describes how to identify the Critical Path for completing a project on schedule. It identifies the cost elements that should be included in a project budget and describes techniques for managing deviations from budgets and schedules. Finally, it describes key elements of project management communications and reporting tools and the key activities of project close-out.

Audience: Those with project management responsibilities or who are part of a project team.

Profiling Mortgage Prospects

This course provides participant with the knowledge to profile a prospective client and recommend the mortgage product that would best fit his or her individual needs. Conventional, FHA, and VA loan products are presented.

Audience: Bank personnel who are currently selling or will begin selling mortgage loans.

Prudent Portfolio Management

Outlines characteristics of a prudent portfolio manager, factors that demonstrate prudence in a court of law, and investment standards put forth in the Uniform Prudent Investor Act. Explores potential tax ramifications of diversification and how the purpose of the Uniform Principal and Income Act can be achieved.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the Prudent Person Rule
  • Describe the standards put forth in the Uniform Prudent Investor Rule and the Uniform Principal and Income Act

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Qualitative Analysis and Determining a Credit Risk Rating

 Qualitative analysis and how to assess industry risk, market risk and management risk. Learn the role of loan policy and the need to summarize the borrower’s various risks into an appropriate credit risk rating.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

The courses included in the Qualitative Analysis and Determining a Credit Risk Rating and their objectives are listed below:

The Commercial Lending Process and Initial Business Development Calls

  • Explain why the commercial lending process is necessary
  • Recognize the process and types of information business bankers should acquire during a business development call

Credit Investigation and Assessing Industry, Market and Management Risk

  • Explain the importance of a credit investigation and describe what it entails
  • Identify industry, market, and management risks that can affect a borrower

Loan Policies and Procedure, Including Credit Risk Ratings

  • Describe how a bank’s organizational structure affects the lending function
  • Identify the key elements of a credit risk rating
  • Describe the loan review process as an independent validation of risk ratings and other commercial lending issues

Loan Packages and Credit Write-Ups

  • Identify typical components of a commercial loan package and memorandum
  • Describe the simpler format, timing, and administration of annual reviews for commercial loans

​Audience: Commercial and/or Business bankers and Credit Analysts

Real Estate Appraisal

This course is a thorough outline of current appraisal theory and practice, providing a practical guide to real estate appraisal for students. After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: define terms associated with real estate appraisal; discuss the formal appraisal process; understand inspections and analysis; understand cost and income approaches; estimate depreciation.

Audience: Anyone working in lending or interested in gaining an understanding of the appraisal process.

Real Estate Appraisal Review

The Real Estate Appraisal Review Online Course is designed primarily for financial institutions professionals who review and analyze appraisal reports in their job assignments. These instructions will provide basic and generic appraisal information about: Interagency guidelines, Appraisal rules, Uniform Standards Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), Appraisal reports, Appraisal valuation process, Concepts of value and Three approaches to value (Cost, Sales Comparison and Income Capitalization).

Audience: This course is primarily for financial institutions professionals in the following positions: Attorneys, Auditors, Appraisers, Claims Specialists, Compliance Review Examiners, Credit Specialists & Officers, Examiners, Fair Lending Specialists, Financial Management Analysts, Resolution Specialists and Senior Audit Specialists.

Real Estate Finance

The Real Estate Finance course provides cutting-edge coverage of specialized mortgage lending procedures—including sources of mortgage money, constraints on those sources, loan qualifications, and laws and regulations that guide practices. This course brings to life the color and law of real estate in day-to-day settings. In addition to the lively case selection, it also has a clear set of rules that will enable you to recognize, solve, and prevent legal issues. As a result of this course, students will be able to: understand partial ownership AND co ownership of real property, and lending issues related to these topics; discuss real estate residential and commercial leases; understand mechanic’s liens (strikethrough: methods of real property conveyance); discuss constitutional issues, specifically eminent domain powers; and understand environmental issues in real property, focusing on Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA).

Real Estate Law

This Real Estate Law course brings to life the color and law of real estate in day-to-day settings.  In addition to the lively case selection, it also has a clear set of rules that will enable you to recognize, solve, and prevent legal issues.  As a result of this course, students will be able to: understand partial ownership AND co-ownership of real property, and lending issues related to these topics; discuss real estate, residential and commercial leases; understand mechanic’s liens (strikethrough: methods of real property conveyance); discuss constitutional issues, specifically eminent domain powers; and understand environmental issues in real property, focusing on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA).

Real Estate Law for Bankers

This seminar explores basic real estate law concepts that are frequently encountered by bankers when structuring, underwriting, documenting and closing loans secured by real estate. The course is taught through the use of a case study problem involving an actual real estate secured, purchase money mortgage loan transaction, giving loan officers, credit officers, document preparation specialists, loan booking specialists and other bankers involved in the lending process a hands on learning experience. This course will benefit bankers involved in both commercial and residential mortgage loan transactions including construction loans, equity lines and other mortgage loan structures.

Topics include:

Basic Principles of Real Estate Law

  • Basic property ownership rights
  • Methods of owning real property and the consequences of each

Legal Descriptions and Surveys

  • Making sense of metes and bounds legal descriptions
  • What is a “plat” or real property?
  • How do we read a survey of real estate?

Real Estate Finance

  • Mortgages, security agreements and other collateral instruments
  • Liens and lien priorities with respect to real estate
  • What is a mortgagee title insurance policy; what does it actually insure?
  • Understanding mortgage spreaders, partial releases of mortgage and other modifications to mortgages

Leases

  • What rights do tenants have under a lease?
  • What are the tenants’ rights versus rights of a mortgagee?

Loan Defaults

  • Mortgage foreclosure and the possibility of deficiency judgments
  • What is an assignment of rents and how is it enforced?

Deeds in lieu of foreclosure

Audience: The course is appropriate for entry level bankers as well as experienced bankers seeking a better understanding of real estate law as it impacts secured lending

Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA)

Identifies the RESPA disclosures required at different stages of the home buying process, including those disclosures formerly required under RESPA that are now part of TRID. Identifies activities specifically prohibited under RESPA and discusses the legal requirements concerning escrow accounts.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss key elements of RESPA coverage
  • Identify the disclosures associated with the home buying process
  • Identify the servicing requirements under RESPA
  • Describe RESPA-related escrow account procedures

Audience: Bank personnel involved in the lending process, including mortgage, consumer and small business lenders, loan processors and loan servicers.

Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) for Compliance Professionals

 Provides a complete overview of the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act requirements, including disclosure requirements and anti-kickback provisions. Explains the early disclosure requirements and tolerances, escrow disclosures, the Affiliated Business Arrangement Notice, requirements for loan servicers, and practices to avoid.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify loan transactions that are covered under RESPA
  • Explain the timing and content of application and settlement disclosures 
  • Identify requirements for loan servicers in all aspects of servicing a mortgage loan
  • Describe activities and business practices prohibited under Section 8 and the consequences of a violation

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Recognizing and Preventing UDAAP

Explores ways to identify whether an unfair, deceptive or abusive act or practice has occurred. Stresses the importance of recognizing the elements of unfair, deceptive or abusive practices; understand the new and existing federal laws and regulations covering UDAAP and proactively helping your bank to avoid UDAAP claims.

Please NOTE: This course uses the term “UDAAP” (instead of UDAP) throughout the course  in order to proactively address  the new “abusive” standard under the CFPB’s Title X. Most bank regulators, however,  are still examining banks under the old UDAP provisions of Section 5 of the FTC Act—the primary federal law that prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices and unfair methods of competition affecting commerce.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize the elements of unfair, deceptive or abusive practices
  • Describe the new and existing federal laws and regulations covering UDAAP
  • Explain how you can help your bank avoid UDAAP claims  ​

Audience: All consumer lenders.

Referring Insurance & Annuities Customers

This seminar introduces the retail-banking employee to insurance products available in today’s banking institutions. Participants learn about the many types of insurance products available, their basic features and how they meet customers’ financial needs. By learning to identify referral opportunities in typical customer contact situations, participants’ apply their understanding of customer needs to make skillful referrals to a licensed insurance sales representative in their organization.

At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: describe how insurance products and services address customer’s financial needs; describe the common types and features of insurance products offered through banks; describe the role of licensed insurance sellers in the bank; identify the customer characteristics that indicate needs for insurance products; explain the benefits of insurance products; and make effective referrals to bank-designated, licensed insurance sellers.

Audience: Any employee who has the opportunity to refer customers to designate licensed insurance sellers in a bank.

Referring Investment Clients

Provides an overview of securities products commonly offered by banks and explains how to detect clues to identify the clients’ recognized and unrecognized financial needs. Explores the effective referral model to help clients see the value in referral suggestions and in meeting with an investment specialist.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify key regulations and guidelines banks must follow when offering investment products
  • Identify benefits and risks associated with investment products
  • Describe the basic features of common investment products
  • Recognize clues and gather information to support and enhance a referral
  • Use the Effective Referral Model to make needs-based, professional referrals
  • Address common client concerns about following through on a referral​ ​

Audience: Bank personnel who manage client relationships and/or who are in a position to identify referral opportunities to licensed specialists.

Referring Mutual Funds and Securities Customers

This course provides an overview of mutual funds and securities that are available through many retail banks today. It covers why banks offer securities products, the risks associated with them, and their basic features.

Audience: Retail bank personnel who manage customer relationships and/or who are in a position to identify referral opportunities, e.g. personal bankers and new accounts staff. Participants are not licensed to sell securities, and in fact may have little or no previous knowledge of securities.

Referring Trust Customers

Teaches participants how to identify and refer potential trust clients. Includes terminology, the basic elements of a trust, common trust products, identifying customer needs and matching them with trust products, and making an effective referral to a trust professional.

Audience: Bank personnel who can manage client relationships and/or who are in a position to identify referral opportunities to trust specialist.

Reg E Consumer Liability

Describes the different notification requirements when an unauthorized EFT does or does not involve an access device. Explores the extent of the customer’s liability depending on when the bank is notified of the error, and how to recognize and differentiate between an unauthorized transactions as opposed to one that is authorized and not eligible for Regulation E error resolution protections.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe an unauthorized transaction
  • Explain a consumer’s responsibility when reporting an unauthorized transaction​

Audience: Back office personnel responsible for resolving Reg E claims, branch personnel, call center personnel.

Reg E Consumer Remittances

Provides the background and purpose of the rule and the facts and circumstances behind determining if and when an institution provides remittance transfers in the normal course of business. Describes the disclosure requirements and the cancellation and error resolution procedures under this rule.

Reg E Disclosure Requirements

Describes the disclosures required by Regulation E that let consumers know their rights and responsibilities and about electronic fund transactions they made or have agreed to make. Describes the disclosures that explain what happens when there is a problem with an electronic funds transfer and what reporting obligations consumers have in order to avoid liability. Discusses periodic statement disclosures and those mandated at ATMs. Covers the rules a bank must follow if it decides to provide disclosures in electronic format.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the following Regulation E required disclosures:
    • ​Initial Disclosure
    •  Change in Terms Disclosure
    • Terminal Receipts
    •  Periodic Statements
    • Debit Fee Notice
    • Error Resolution Notice

Audience: Any employees who open consumer accounts or who sign customers up for new electronic products or services.​

Reg E Error Resolution Requirements

Describes the procedures financial institutions must follow after receiving notice from a consumer of an error for an EFT. Covers the time limits for investigations, provisional credit, and notice requirements when a bank determines whether or not an error occurred.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Clarify what is or is not an error for Regulation E purposes
  • Explain the error resolution timing requirements for the bank
  • Describe the notification requirements once the investigation is complete

Audience: Back office personnel responsible for resolving Reg E claims.​​​​

Reg E Gift Cards

Describes the amendments to  Regulation E made to implement the gift card provisions of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 (Credit CARD Act). Explores the protections for consumers that purchase or use gift cards, and reviews the types of products covered, restrictions on fees and expiration dates, and the disclosures required to be on the card or with the card.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the types of gift cards that are and are not covered under Regulation E
  • Describe the disclosure requirements for gift cards
  • Explain the provisions for card fees and expiration dates
  • Describe the disclosure requirements for loyalty, reward, or promotional cards​

Audience: Tellers or any branch personnel responsible for issuing gift cards to consumers.​​​​

Reg E Overdrafts

Describes the debit cards overdraft rule under Regulation E and what consumer deposit and payroll card accounts are covered as well as the accounts not covered. Explains how the rule prohibits imposing any fee for paying an ATM or one-time debit card overdraft unless the customer has received a notice explaining the fee and consented or opted-in.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the debit cards overdraft rule under Regulation E 
  • Identify what is and what is not covered
  • Explain the opt-in requirements for certain debit card overdrafts under Regulation E

Audience: Tellers, CSRs, personal bankers, call center, back office responsible for overdraft determinations.

Reg E Overview

Explores the types of transactions and services covered under Regulation E, the disclosures required, and the error and liability provisions. Explains the importance of acting promptly when notified by a customer of a potential error or unauthorized transaction.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe background and purpose of Regulation E—what is covered and what is not 
  • Explain the requirements and protections related to access devices
  • Describe the information disclosures Regulation E requires banks and other card issuers to provide to their customers
  • Explain the comprehensive Regulation E error resolution process
  • Describe the other Regulation E protections for customers​

Audience: All employees who need an overview of Reg E requirements.​

​​​​​​​Reg E Payroll Cards

Describes how Regulation E applies to a payroll card “account” just as it applies to other types of traditional deposit accounts, such as checking and savings accounts. Explains the exceptions, including those that apply to periodic statements and error resolution.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe an overview of the Regulation E requirements for payroll cards
  • Explain the issuance and restrictions associated with Regulation E for payroll cards
  • Describe the specific Regulation E requirements associated with payroll cards​

Audience: Any bank employees involved in the issuance of payroll cards and maintenance of online statements for payroll cards.​

Reg E Preauthorized Transfers

Explains the requirements to authorize a preauthorized electronic fund transfer from a consumer’s account. Describes compulsory use and the stop payment of a preauthorized electronic fund transfer, including notification to the bank orally or in writing.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define a preauthorized transfer
  • Clarify the stop payment rules applicable to preauthorized transfers from an account
  • Explain the disclosure requirements for preauthorized transfers​

Audience: Any frontline or back office personnel responsible for managing preauthorized transfers including direct deposit.

Reg Z Ability to Repay (ATR) and Qualified Mortgage (QM) for Compliance Professionals

 Explains the ability to repay rules for all Regulation Z closed-end mortgages, including the eight minimum underwriting factors and the special circumstances that qualify for transitioning nonstandard to standard mortgage loans. Describes the purpose and qualifications associated with the qualified mortgage rules.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the Ability to Repay rules for covered Regulation Z closed-end mortgages
  • Explain the purpose and qualifications for the Qualified Mortgage rules

Audience: Compliance and risk management professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, and auditors.​

Reg Z Adjustable Rate Mortgages

Covers the features, benefits, advantages, and disadvantages of adjustable rate mortgage loans. Discusses Regulation Z disclosure requirements for ARMs.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Examine why ARMs may or may not be the best option for consumers  
  • Describe the four components of an ARM
  • Identify the disclosure requirements of an ARM ​

Audience: Any branch staff who discusses mortgage products with consumers or who take mortgage loan applications.

Reg Z Advertising

Defines the meaning of “advertisement” under Regulation Z, the meaning of “triggering terms” and discusses the types of disclosures required in various types of loan advertising, including credit cards, mortgages and private higher education loans.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe general advertising rules that comply with Reg Z
  • Explain advertising requirements for closed-end credit
  • Examine special rules for closed- end credit advertising for loans secured by a dwelling 
  • Explain advertising requirements for open-end credit
  • Examine special rules for open-end credit advertising for loans secured by a dwelling 
  • Recognize the special rules that apply to advertising mortgages, private higher education loans, and credit cards​

Audience: Branch staff or anyone responsible for bank advertising, including white board signage, website, rate sheets, rate boards, and credit brochures.

Reg Z Closed-End Credit

An overview of the structure and core requirements of Regulation Z, as well as exercises to aid in complying with the regulation. This course explains the closed-end portion of Regulation Z, including key terminology and requirements for disclosures provided before and during loan consummation. It explores the features of high cost mortgages, higher priced mortgages and qualified mortgages.

Reg Z Closed-End Credit for Compliance Professionals

 Reviews the closed-end portion of Regulation Z, including key terminology and requirements for disclosures provided before and during loan consummation. The course explores the features of high-cost mortgages, higher priced mortgages and qualified mortgages.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain coverage under Regulation Z
  • Calculate the finance charge and amount financed
  • Describe the difference between the annual percentage rate (APR) and the interest rate
  • Explain the timing and format of early disclosures, and items that must be included with transaction disclosures
  • Describe the characteristics of high cost mortgages, higher priced mortgages and qualified mortgages

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Reg Z Credit Cards

Includes the key provisions of the CARD Act and how it protects consumers from unexpected interest charges. Requires that consumers receive a reasonable amount of time to make their credit card payments, enhances required disclosures, and allows consumers to access credit on terms that are fair and more easily understood.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the key points in the credit card account rule
  • Examine the restrictions of interest rate increases
  • Examine the limitations set on fees and penalty interest
  • Identify the reasonable due date rules for payment deadlines
  • Identify requirements for periodic statement disclosures. ​

Audience: Consumer Lenders, Call Center Representatives and CSRs at banks that offer consumer credit cards.

Reg Z HELOCs (Open-End Credit)

Explains the Regulation Z requirements for home equity lines of credit, including disclosures, changes in terms, and periodic statements.​

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define a home equity line of credit
  • Explain what disclosures are required and when they must be provided
  • Identify the circumstances when lenders are allowed to change the terms of a home equity line of credit
  • Understand the requirements for periodic statements

Audience: Any branch staff that discusses home equity options with consumers or takes consumer applications for home equity products.

Reg Z HOEPA and High-Cost Mortgage Loans

Describes the characteristics of mortgage loans subject to either the HOEPA or the HPML requirements of Regulation Z. This course explains the underwriting standards, timing and disclosure requirements, escrow, and servicing requirements. It also explains the penalties for violations of these sections of Regulation.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the disclosures required and what they include 
  • Describe the features that are banned from high-rate, high-fee loans 
  • Examine the impact of laws and regulations and the consequences of non-compliance 
  • Recognize a HOEPA loan based on price and type of loan 
  • Recognize an HPML and understand the additional requirements for HPMLs​​

Audience: All branch personnel responsible for taking consumer mortgage loan applications.

Reg Z Installment and Home Equity Loans (Closed-End Credit)

Describes closed end adjustable rate and fixed rate closed-end lending, including installment loans and home equity loans and the requirements for both.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the features of closed-end loans and the required disclosures for variable and fixed rate credit
  • Describe  the features of home equity loans
  • Examine the rules and disclosures for home equity loans ​

Audience: Branch staff (lenders, CSRs Call Center, personal bankers) who takes consumer loan applications or discuss loan products with consumers.  For some banks, this course may also be applicable for tellers making referrals to the platform.

Reg Z Mortgages (Closed-End Credit)

Discusses Regulation Z disclosure issues pertinent to mortgage lending, and includes the Regulation Z rules applicable to loan servicing, MDIA, appraisals, mortgage servicing rules and mortgage loan originator compensation.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the mortgage transfer disclosures under the Mortgage Disclosure Improvement Act (MDIA)
  • Describe the rules on mortgage loan originator compensation
  • Identify the loan transfer and loan servicer rules
  • Examine the Reg Z rules on appraisals

Audience: Any branch staff responsible for taking mortgage applications or who are compensated as mortgage loan originators.

Reg Z Non Home Secured (Open-End Credit)

This course discusses types of open-end non-home secured lines of credit other than credit cards. The course reviews disclosure requirements, periodic statement requirements, change in terms notices, payment processing rules, and liability for non-compliance.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the account opening disclosures 
  • Explain the requirements for periodic statements 
  • Describe change-in-terms notice requirements
  • Explain the rules about payments on lines of credit

Audience: Branch staff (lenders, CSRs Call Center, personal bankers) who takes consumer line of credit applications (such as overdraft lines of credit) or discuss loan products with consumers.  For some banks, this course may also be applicable for tellers making referrals to the platform.

Reg Z Open-End Credit

An overview of the structure and core requirements of Regulation Z, as well as exercises to aid in complying with the regulation. Regulation Z, which implements the federal Truth in Lending Act (TILA), promotes the informed use of credit among consumers. Students will learn about the open-end portion of Regulation Z, including history, purpose, coverage, and disclosures. Students will also learn about rules relating to billing errors, crediting payments, credit balances, and advertising.

Reg Z Open-End Credit for Compliance Professionals

Reviews the open-end portion of Regulation Z, including history, purpose, coverage, and disclosures. Explains rules relating to billing errors, crediting payments, credit balances, and advertising.​

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the history and purpose of  Regulation Z
  • Identify credit transactions covered under Regulation Z
  • Explain disclosure requirements for applications and solicitations, account opening, change in terms, periodic statements, and other subsequent disclosures
  • Describe requirements for billing error resolution, crediting of payments, and treatment of credit balances
  • Explain advertising rules for HELOCs, not home secured transactions, and marketing to college students

Audience:  Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Reg Z Overview

This course explains the basics of Regulation Z, along with the applicability and coverage of Reg Z and what types of transactions are not covered. It explains key terms used in Reg Z and the types of finance charges and items excluded from finance charges. 

Note: This course is the mandatory prerequisite for all other Reg Z frontline compliance courses.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of Reg Z
  • Examine the importance of APR and finance charges, included on the Reg Z disclosure form
  • Explain key terms on different parts of the Reg Z disclosure form
  • Identify loans made to consumers that are required to comply with Reg Z
  • Examine the penalties for non compliance with Reg Z requirements

Audience: All branch staff that need to know anything about Regulation Z.

Reg Z Private Higher Education Loans

This course discusses the amendments to Reg Z that apply to any closed-end, non-home secured loan extended expressly, in whole or in part, to be used for post-secondary educational expenses. It discusses the disclosure requirements for such loans and the applicability of the right to cancel.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain what type of loan qualifies to be a private higher education loan under the Reg Z rules
  • Explain what disclosures are required and when they must be provided
  • Understand how the right to cancel applies to these types of loans​

Audience: All branch personnel responsible for taking loan applications or speaking to customers about private higher education loans.

Reg Z Reverse Mortgages

This course defines reverse mortgages and covers suitability for such products, and reviews the current disclosure requirements.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe a reverse mortgage
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of a reverse mortgage for some consumers
  • Identify the disclosure requirements for a reverse mortgage including the TALC rate

Audience: Branch staff such as consumer loan officers who discuss reverse mortgages with consumers.

Reg Z Right of Rescission

This course explains the reasons for the right of rescission, disclosures required, how to calculate the rescission period and how to answer consumer questions concerning this right. New rules on a consumer’s right to cancel a private education loan are also included.

Note: The Reg Z Overview course must be taken at least once before any other Reg Z course is attempted.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Determine when the rescission period begins and ends
  • Explain the rescission process to your clients
  • Answer some common customer questions about the rescission period​

Audience: All branch personnel responsible for closing consumer private higher loans or loans secured by a consumer’s primary residence.

Regulation J & S (FEDWIRE)

Regulation J governs all funds transfers performed through Fedwire. Explore Subpart B and learn about the general regulation requirements, internal controls and operations, and practices you must be aware of to ensure your institution maintains compliance.

Regulation K

Course provides a basic definition of the different types of foreign banking licenses that may be granted, and their powers and limitations. It also deals with IBF Deposits, International lending, etc.

Regulatory Compliance for Bank Tellers

This ABA course offers valuable information on eight regulations that directly affect the responsibilities of tellers in most financial institutions. The regulations have been divided into three categories: Privacy and Security, Deposit, and Equal Treatment.

Audience: Tellers who must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the regulations specific to the responsibilities that are part of the day-to-day job functions.

Regulatory Compliance for Call Center Representatives

This ABA course offers valuable information on ten regulations that directly affect the responsibilities of Call Center Representatives in most financial institutions. The regulations have been divided into four categories: Privacy and Security, Deposit, General Account Inquiry, and Equal Treatment.

Audience: Call Center Representatives who must effectively demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the regulations that affect bank policies and procedures.

Regulatory Compliance for Customer Service Representatives

This ABA course offers valuable information on ten regulations that directly affect the responsibilities of Customer Service Representatives in most financial institutions. The regulations have been divided into four categories: Privacy and Security, Deposit, General Account Inquiry, and Equal Treatment.

Audience: Customer Service Representatives who need a thorough knowledge of the regulations that affect bank policies and procedures.

Regulatory Compliance for Personal Bankers

This ABA Course offers valuable information on sixteen regulations that directly affect the responsibilities of Personal Bankers in most financial institutions. The regulations have been divided into six categories: Privacy and Security, Deposit, Ethics and Fair Lending, Equal Treatment, Real Estate, and Truth in Lending.

Audience: Personal Bankers who must successfully demonstrate knowledge of regulatory compliance issues.

Regulatory Exam Management

Focuses on the regulatory examination process and keys for administering the exam process to ensure success. Describes the role and examination approach for different regulatory agencies, establishing responsibilities for bank employees and reducing the impact on bank operations. Covers responding to unfavorable exam results, appeals process and viewing the relationship as a partnership.

Regulatory Exam Management

Focuses on the regulatory examination process and keys for administering the exam process to ensure success. Describes the role and examination approach for different regulatory agencies, establishing responsibilities for bank employees and reducing the impact on bank operations. Covers responding to unfavorable exam results, appeals process and viewing the relationship as a partnership.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain bank and regulatory objectives for examinations
  • Identify the tools used by regulatory agencies to execute the supervisory process
  • Describe fundamental components of exam management from the regulatory perspective
  • Describe fundamental components of exam management from the bank perspective
  • Identify leading practices for exam management

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.​

Relationship Banking/Business Development

The overall goal of this seminar is to equip relationship managers with the skills and understanding to enable them to act as strategic partners for their clients.

Learning objectives:

  • Anticipate client need by cultivating a better understanding of the key business and financial drivers of company performance
  • Use a structured approach to spot potential business opportunities and identify the right questions to ask in client meetings
  • How best to use and maximize the Relationship Selling Model
  • Discuss the various Business Calls and strategize actions to maximize results

Audience: Relationship managers, officers and other professionals in banks who wish to identify business opportunities with their clients

Relationship Selling to Small Business Customers

This course walks participants through a complete sales cycle focusing on the unique needs of the small business customer. Participants apply the operating cycle and life stages to evaluate needs and present solutions.

Audience: Bank personnel who are new to the small businesses market and are responsible for selling bank products and services to small business customers.

Reserve Requirements for Depository Institutions (Reg D)

Covers the Regulation D-imposed reserve requirements. Defines transaction accounts, and includes the restrictions on NOW account eligibility and on the type and number of transactions allowed per month for Money Market deposit and savings accounts. Explains the requirements to follow when clients conduct excessive withdrawals or transfers of funds.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the concept of reserve deposits and the transactions included in the reserve requirement calculation
  • Identify key Reg D requirements for demand deposit accounts and NOW accounts
  • Explain the restrictions on savings accounts and how to handle excessive transfers and withdrawals
  • Describe key Reg D requirements for time deposit accounts

Audience: Call Center Representatives, Customer Service Representatives and Tellers who interact with clients over the phone on a daily basis.

Residential Mortgage Lending

This course covers construction and permanent financing for residential property; real estate law; documentation; mortgage loan servicing; the secondary mortgage market; the role of government in mortgage lending; and residential real estate as an investment. The discussion of underwriting, processing, and servicing will give participants a framework for learning the mortgage lending business and refining their existing knowledge. Additionally, the coverage of laws and regulations affecting mortgage lending provide an understanding of mortgage lending’s history and a glimpse into its future.

Audience: Financial service professionals who want a broad overview of mortgage lending.

Residential Mortgage Lending: Origination

Participants will learn how origination fits into the lending process. They will learn to complete a conventional residential application and initiate the documents needed to support the loan application, answer customer inquiries effectively and in compliance, in order to accurately prepare both your customer and themselves for the loan interview, as well as perform the required follow-up after the loan interview.

Audience: Loan officers, loan originators, mortgage bankers, mortgage brokers and anyone who interviews borrowers and completes applications for conventional residential mortgage loans.

Residential Mortgage Lending Overview

This course will designed to teach participants the steps in the lending cycle, name the steps in loan closing, understand mortgage loan products and documents, as well as types of costs associated with a loan, and to understand interest, simple interest and amortization. It describes a fixed-rate and adjustable rate mortgage. It explains the regulations that affect the lending practices, and explains how an applicant’s income, assets and debits are analyzed.

Audience: Tellers, customer services representatives, supervisors or anyone interested in learning about residential mortgage lending fundamentals.

Residential Mortgage Lending: Processing

Participants will learn how to prepare a complete file for a conventional loan. They will complete documentation for underwriting, complete documents required to close a loan, and recognize the importance of documentation and organizational liability, and how to identify how the credit decision is made, as well as, prepare the required regulatory documents, and provide customer service during the loan process.

Audience: Loan processors, mortgage bankers, mortgage brokers, loan closers, quality control specialists and anyone involved inn residential mortgage lending operations.

Residential Mortgage Lending: Servicing

Participants will learn how to service all kinds of mortgage loans, including secondary market and FHA.VA loans. The will learn to process each type of mortgage payment for six payment types, accurately process ARM payment changes & notification requirements, understand restrictions for prepayments and payoffs. The will review escrow accounts and compliance with sate & federal regulations including RESPA and Homeowner’s Protection Act. They will learn how to identify problems in borrowers’ payment habits to prevent delinquencies and change contracts with confidence. They will also learn how to assist in the foreclosure process by gathering appropriate documents and records, filing notices as needed and closing out or transferring records.

Audience: Anyone involved in residential mortgage lending and servicing.

Residential Mortgage Lending: Underwriting

Participants will follow step-by-step underwriting procedures to increase efficiency. They will learn the adjustable rate loan underwriting guidelines and risks, evaluate the loan investment potential, as well as, assess the borrower’s willingness and ability to repay through verification and documentation, locate pertinent information on the Uniform Residential Appraisal Report, investigate appraised market value and appropriate loan amounts, evaluate the loan investment potential in order to analyze compensating factors to help qualify non-standard borrowers.

Audience: Loan officers, loan brokers and anyone who specializes in underwriting or wants to become more knowledgeable about this part of the lending process. This is a challenging course. It is recommended that you have a background in mortgage loan processing or complete “Residential Mortgage Lending”.

Retirement Planning

Retirement Planning focuses on the types of retirement plans available, factors that impact various plans, and the importance of integrating retirement benefits with financial and estate planning. Activities offer an opportunity to apply guidelines that address the unique implications of retirement assets.

Audience: Trust Officers who have already achieved a basic level of knowledge and expertise in the trust field.

Retirement Products for Small Businesses

This course introduces and defines retirement products and services appropriate for small businesses including IRAs, Keoghs, SEP IRAs and Employee Benefit Trusts. Participants receive tools for on-the-job use in making benefit-focused retirement product referrals.

Audience: Bank personnel who manage small business relationships and have responsibilities referring and/or selling retirement services and products.

Reviewing the Appraisal Report

A thorough review of the Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report, Form 1073, highlighting the key differences between this and the Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Form 1004). Current appraisal policies and procedures will also be covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Distinguish project eligibility requirements
  • Identify the unique characteristics of the Individual Condo Unit Appraisal Report
  • Identify indicators of value
  • Recognize appraiser methodologies for condominium appraisals

Audience: QC personnel, Underwriters.​

Revitalizing Customer Service

This workshop will have participants using a variety of exercises and group activities to define basic customer service skills and examine how the use of those skills adds to the personal and professional productivity levels of the participants. Participants will be using a worksheet throughout the day while practicing new skills or enhancing current levels of customer service. Each section will also give managers an opportunity to see how these customer service skills can benefit some key areas of managing employees such as providing constructive feedback, taking corrective action and coaching. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: identify and define basic customer service skills, use the basic skills in current workplace environments, understand how perspectives impact customer service, isolate personal symptoms of stress and the possible impact of those symptoms on service levels, connect three areas of communications and listening to clarify the intended message, and apply customer skills to interactions with angry or difficult customers.

Audience: All levels of employees.

Rewards & Recognition

This seminar discusses techniques for using non-monetary and small dollar value awards to recognize, reward and motivate employees toward continued and improved performance. The group will explore effective and ineffective forms of recognition and the consequences of failing to recognize people. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: diagnose motivational problems, and discuss various incentives for performance improvement; brainstorm reasons for and ways to recognize employees; and discuss appropriate methods of delivering recognition, and the outcomes of ineffective recognition plans.

Audience: Any employee responsible for motivating staff regardless of the specific reporting relationships. This could include managers, supervisors, team leaders and mentors.

Risk and Control Self Assessment

Explains the risk and control self assessment (RCSA) process and its role in a bank’s risk culture. Convers establishing the primary objectives of the RCSA process, identifying risks and appropriate control environment, determining relative priorities, and the overall purpose and benefits of an RCSA.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define operational risk, identify control frameworks, and describe the purpose and benefits of conducting a risk and control self-assessment (RCSA)
  • Identify considerations for effective implementation of the RCSA
  • Describe approaches for assessing and prioritizing risks
  • Describe methods for managing and controlling risks
  • Identify techniques and resources to gather data, perform the RCSA, and monitor and report results

Audience: Risk and internal audit professionals; third-party service providers and state/federal examiners; first-line risk and operations managers with responsibilities for operational risk management, including implementing, managing, monitoring, reporting, auditing and/or supporting an effective operational risk management program, policies and procedures.

 

Risk Management & Risk Based Supervision

Executive and bank officers, as well as anyone involved in risk management, and serving as liaison with bank regulators.

Audience: Executive and bank officers, as well as anyone involved in risk management, and serving as liaison with bank regulators.

Robbery and Bank Security

The tools needed to handle the most common security situations like robbery, bomb and kidnapping threat, active shooter incidents and fire. Security routines and ethical behavior to ensure your own physical safety, as well as the safety of coworkers and customers, is covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate appropriate behavior before, during, and after a robbery
  • Respond to bomb and kidnapping threats, active shooter incidents, and fire in a safe manner
  • Recognize potential con artist behavior
  • Demonstrate safe daily routines
  • Practice ethical behavior

Audience: Bank personnel in a retail branch environment.

Sales Coaching in the Bank

This seminar will prepare the sales coach to support their team for continued sales success. On-going coaching and motivation will be explored. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: describe the role of a sales coach; identify sales coaching opportunities; identify coaching strategies to support team members with both sales-focused and service-focused job functions; set team and individual sales goals; and motivate top sales performance.

Audience: Any person responsible for leading a bank’s sales team or sales campaign.

Sales Excellence

This course challenges financial institution employees to see themselves as sales professionals. It provides the tools needed to achieve the level of sales professionalism required by financial institutions today. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: overcome hesitations about selling and benefit from a professional approach to sales; recognize how your sales efforts benefit your institution, your customer and you; adjust your selling techniques to comply with the unique challenges of financial selling; identify customers’ financial needs quickly and efficiently in a variety of customer situations; structure your sales presentation as a dialog with the customer, rather than’ pitching’ the product; use the techniques of listening, questioning and communicating nonverbally to improve results in sales situations; customize product presentations for specific customers and their problems or needs; present products in terms if benefits as well as features in order to gain customer commitment; gauge customer interest in the product enabling you to ask for the sale at the right time; respond effectively to common objections to financial products and services; use proven strategies for efficiently confirming the sale; create a positive customer encounter, regardless of the outcome; analyze demographics to help understand customers’ life-styles and their financial wants and needs; shop the competition to improve sales results; implement tele-consulting strategies to improve sales results; and use goal setting and the power of positive thinking to improve sales success.

Audience: Anyone who works at a financial institution and has customer contact including tellers, personal bankers and loan officers.

Search Engine Optimization

Search engine optimization (SEO) is a critical way to make your bank more visible to people seeking what you have to offer. Learn about the factors that affect search results and identify best practices that can help you and your bank right away.

Modules:

  • Search Engines: Drive Traffic
  • On-Page: Maximize Your Site
  • Off-Page: Attract Visitors
  • Writing for SEO: Contribute to Success

What You’ll Learn

  • Describe how search engines work, including how they identify and rank webpages
  • Identify the factors on a website that most affect search rankings
  • Identify the factors separate from your website that most affect search rankings
  • Write content to optimize search results

Audience: Marketing professionals.

Selling Fundamentals

The Selling Fundamentals course prepares students with a detailed, yet broad, step-by-step selling process that is universal in nature. Selling Fundamentals demonstrates to students the order of steps within the selling process; provides numerous examples of what should be in each step; and shows how the steps within the selling process interact with one another. Combined with up-to-date content and a strong ethical focus, Selling Fundamentals teaches sales the way a mentor would: with a strong, practical focus that puts the customer first.

Service Business Examination

The Course is designed for inexperienced examiners and may be beneficial for more experienced examiners or other staff members who have not had formal training in conducting examinations of money service business (MSB) licensees. In addition, this course may be beneficial for MSB industry staff members and others who have a need to learn about the operations of MSBs, specifically check cashing and money transmitting businesses.

Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA)

Covers specific SCRA requirements for banks such as interest rate relief and foreclosure protections offered to military personnel. Explains the rights of the borrower under these laws, and the importance of bankers knowing the rights provided by the SCRA to service personnel to be able to act accordingly.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the background and purpose of the SCRA 
  • Describe the rights of a borrower under the SCRA 
  • Describe how the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) fits with the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act

Audience​​​: Bank personnel with lending and collection responsibilities.

Service-members Civil Relief Act (SCRA) for Compliance Professionals

 Explains the rights and obligations afforded to our servicemembers and their dependents and the responsibilities of financial institutions to comply with SCRA and related acts in order to protect servicemembers from certain disadvantages while they are serving the country.​

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the major provisions of SCRA, its subsequent amendments, the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 and Veterans’ Benefit Act of 2010, and cite those that govern financial services, including the following provisions:
    • Limits on foreclosure and eviction
    • Interest rate caps on loans
    • Prohibitions on credit reporting
    • Termination of leases and installment contracts
  • Define those military personnel covered by SCRA and the documentation required
  • Describe the regulations and guidance governing mortgage servicing, modification and foreclosure
  • Explain the modification requirements for existing balances on credit cards and installment loans

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Servicing & Growing Small Business Relationships

This seminar addresses activities involving small business customers to effectively protect bank assets and expand the small business customer relationship. Activities include monitoring financials and information, and conducting site visits on the four business types: Manufacturing, Wholesaler, Retailer, and Service. Group discussions include turning routine follow-up activities into opportunities to grow the relationship. Participants develop a personalized strategy to conduct routine follow-up activities with customers. At the conclusion of the program the participant will be able to: Explain the importance of following up after a sale has been made; Identify routine functions that can turn into opportunities to service (protect) and grow (expand) small business customer relationships; Describe the benefits of monitoring financial statements and information on small business customer relationships; Describe the benefits of conducting site visits on small business customer relationships; Implement a strategy to conduct routine follow-up on small business customer relationships.

Audience: Bank personnel responsible for managing and growing a portfolio of small business customers.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

This course focuses on behavior awareness. Students will learn how Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 defines sexual harassment. Through a series of scenario examples, students will be engaged in identifying conduct that could be considered unwelcome or inappropriate. Two forms of harassment will be explained: quid pro quo and hostile environment. Students will be given some steps they should follow if they feel they are victims of sexual harassment. They will also be encouraged to focus on their own actions and consider how those actions may be perceived by others.

Audience: All employees

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace for Managers

This course builds on the content in Sexual Harassment in the Workplace and explains the role supervisors play in establishing and maintaining a work environment that discourages and prohibits this unwelcome behavior. Supervisors will be given tools they can use to help them create a “safe” environment for employees. Included in this course are the consequences of ignoring reports of inappropriate or unwelcome behavior that may be considered sexually harassment. A “Talking Points Worksheet” provides a checklist of tips on how to handle reports of sexual harassment.

Audience: Supervisors who have little formal knowledge of supervision.

Small Business Borrowing

This course provides describes the characteristics of the small business market that make it an attractive source of potential business. This course explores the overall relationship between the borrowing cause, loan purpose, and repayment source to better understand the small business client credit needs. This course also explains the key steps to effectively communicate credit decisions to clients.

Audience: Bank personnel who are responsible for selling credit products to the small business customer and/or responsible for identifying sales opportunities and referring small business lending prospects to the appropriate bank contacts.

Social Media: Managing the Risks

Explains the risks and regulatory concerns in social media including how banking laws and regulations apply. Provides guidelines for bank employees’ use of personal social media and includes examples of inappropriate use. Highlights key considerations when developing a program to identify, monitor and control social media risk including managing social media customer complaints.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the opportunities and challenges that banks face using social media
  • Explain the risks and regulatory challenges in social media 
  • Discuss the risks and handling complaints received through social media
  • Describe how to manage personal use of social media

Audience: All staff using social media, particularly marketing staff or any staff allowed to post to the bank’s social media sites. Legal and Chief Risk Officers and Compliance Officers who need to monitor the bank’s social media with regard to privacy laws, reputational risk, advertising requirements and other potential issues.

Spanish For Bankers – Beginning

This workshop will enable participants to communicate with Spanish speaking clients in a basic manner. The participants will have the tools to be able to conduct routine banking transactions with customers at a basic level.

Spanish For Bankers – Intermediate

This workshop will enable participants to communicate with Spanish speaking clients in a more complete and professional manner. This course is for banking professional who have taken the Beginning Level or have some Spanish Language skills or exposure.

Special Needs Trusts

Upon application and verification, the federal government may pay supplemental security income to certain handicapped individuals with limited earning power. Learn how a special needs trust can protect current or anticipated family funds without jeopardizing SSI.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe how special needs trusts are used to meet client objectives
  • Describe the planning process for creating special needs trusts

Audience​​​​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Statement Analysis

This course gives practical, hands-on experience inn making credit decisions and in examining income statements, balance sheets, cash flow statements, and other financial documents.

Audience: Commercial bank employees being trained as credit analysts.

Statistics

The Statistics course delivers clear and understandable explanations of core business statistics concepts. Course work emphasizes the importance of interpreting statistical results to make effective decisions to improve business processes. The text offers real applications of statistics that are relevant to today’s business students which can be seen in the continuing case studies throughout the book. Continuing cases span throughout a chapter or even groups of chapters, easing students into new topic areas.

Audience: Anyone looking for an introduction to statistics.

Stock Selection and Analysis

There is more than one type of stock, just as there is more than one type of analyst. Stock Selection and Analysis will show you the different methods these analysts use, the different types of trades, and the different strategies.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the different categories of stock
  • Describe fundamental analysis
  • Describe technical analysis
  • Identify stock trading methods and strategies

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Stocks & Bonds A to Z

This workshop is designed for people who want to learn how to invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds or options, as well as for experienced investors who want to improve their investment results and learn new investment strategies.

Strategic Twitter

Twitter has become an essential way to share instant feedback with companies and brands. Learn how to leverage Twitter to develop compelling content and grow your bank’s audience of customers, prospects, and influencers.

Modules:

  • Stand Out: Create a Compelling Account
  • Keep Up: Develop a Powerful Network
  • Tune In: Keep Up in a Busy World
  • Share: Be a Thought Leader
  • Reach Out: Promote Your Brand

What You’ll Learn

  • Explain the best practices for creating accounts and content
  • Identify strategies to connect with prospects and customers
  • Create content that engages
  • Create a strategy to achieve your communication and marketing objectives
  • Identify the types of advertising available on Twitter

Audience: Any bank employee who uses Twitter to promote the bank’s brand, products, and services.

Successful Sales Campaigns

This seminar is designed for individuals who are managing or are involved in a sales campaign focusing on one product or a small group of products. At the conclusion of the program participants will be able to: locate and use demographic information to match bank products to the bank’s available customer base; prepare bank personnel for the sales campaign; create and maintain enthusiasm for the sales campaign; identify regulations for advertising the bank’s promotion; develop a sales campaign that gets the attention of the bank’s customers; use creative methods to track the progress of the campaign; and celebrate and evaluate the results of the promotion after it has ended.

Audience: Any banking professionals who currently take part in sales campaigns.

Supervision

Supervision blends skill-building techniques and traditional management principles to prepare students to become supervisors in today’s business world. The course will emphasize that supervision is working through people to develop and empower them to become better and more efficient in their roles, and closely follows the SCANS requirements for the five workplace competencies and three-part foundation of skills and personal qualities needed for job performance.

Audience: Both practicing and aspiring supervisors who have little formal knowledge of supervision.

Supervisor Certificate

This course prepares new and potential first-level supervisors to handle people management duties. Among the topics covered are hiring, performance management, coaching, rewards and recognition, corrective action, managing employee relations, and managing change. Students who complete this course and the Banking Today course or equivalent experience will receive the AIB Supervisor Certificate.

Audience: New and potential first level supervisors.

Technology Applications in Mortgage Finance

This course will provide the student with tools and skill levels needed to incorporate technology into all aspects of the mortgage loan cycle.

Tele-Consulting

This course helps participants understand the unique challenges of telephone sales and learn specific techniques to overcome common obstacles to success.

Audience: Banking professional who make outbound telephone service and sales contact with an assigned client portfolio.

Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA)

Describes the technology included in an auto-dialer and types of prohibited phone calls. Teaches the FCC interpretation of prior express consent and exceptions to the Telephone Consumer Protection’s (TCPA) prior consent requirements and disclosures. Identifies requirements of the National Do Not Call Registry and distinctions between the TSR and the TCPA.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the TCPA’s coverage, rules, and exemptions
  • Describe the TCPA’s consent requirements and their application to calls, ported and reassigned numbers, texts, and faxes 
  • Describe the requirements of the Do Not Call Registry and the differences between the Telemarketing Sales Rule (TSR) and the TCPA

Audience: Marketing, call center, sales and collections staff, as well as any employees responsible for placing any types of calls to customers.

Teller Basics Curriculum (Today’s Teller)

The ABA Teller Basics course is designed to onboard newly hired tellers. The 8 self-paced modules are designed to simplify new teller training, reduce teller training time and costs, and provide your new tellers with a working knowledge of teller fundamentals.

The highly interactive modules are supplemented with industry best-practice procedures and off-line exercises that can personalize the experience to your bank. As a stand-alone program or as a supplement to your bank’s on-the-line training, Teller Basics can significantly accelerate the process of preparing your new tellers to begin serving customers. Use of the program also ensures consistency in training across all bank locations.

Audience: New tellers

Teller Operations

After successfully completing this Teller Operations training course, you will be able to: describe the expectations of your role as a teller; respond effectively to difficult customer situations; understand the cross-selling opportunities provided by daily transactions; distinguish between genuine and counterfeit currency; avoid balancing errors; conduct proper procedures during a robbery, fire or other emergency; explain the Currency Transaction Report; describe endorsement types and their individual features; and utilize negotiability and security measures to prevent check fraud.

The 21st Century Supervisor Red Program

This course provides an overview of the supervisory function along with key concepts such as, identifying the challenges facing today’s supervisors. It teaches participants how to use SMART goals to develop planning strategies like, how to effectively communicate to their staff, understand their role in developing a customer-driven culture, and understand and apply the rules that govern employment issues.

Audience: New or experienced supervisors and first-line managers or those preparing for such a role.

The Banking Industry

The Banking Industry is an essential introduction to the business of banking. The course covers the evolution of banking since the 2008 financial crisis, the role of banks in the U.S. economy and the environment in which banks operate and compete. It provides a look into various banking career tracks to inspire and prepare and motivate new bankers and covers innovations in financial products.​ (4 weeks)

The Banking Industry is one of three Banking Fundamentals courses that explore the principles of the banking industry. Enroll in one, two, or all three to meet your needs.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe how banks serve customer needs
  • Identify major bank competitors
  • Identify regulators, major laws and banking regulations
  • Explain how banks meet their financial goals
  • Discuss future trends in banking

Audience: Anyone who needs an introduction to banking, whether just starting a career or a more experienced professional from a different industry.​​​

The Commercial Real Estate Lending Decision Process 

A comprehensive study of CRE lending, beginning with a description of loan types and progressing to an understanding of the underwriting process, leases, appraisals, loan structures and related risks. The series also includes resources, including reproducible work sheets for cash flow, compliance and important financial ratio calculations.​​

Course List

The courses included in The Commercial Real Estate Lending Decision Process Curriculum are:

  • Series 1: Types of CRE Loans, Risk Areas and Performance Drivers
  • Series 2: The CRE Underwriting Process
  • Series 3: Financing Different Types of Commercial Properties
  • Series 4: Understanding and Evaluating Leases, Appraisals and Environmental Assessments
  • Series 5: Loan Structure and Documentation Considerations
  • Series 6: Construction Lending

There are 14 courses included in the complete Commercial Real Estate Lending Decision Process series. Approximate time to complete all courses and modules in the curriculum is between 18 to 25 hours.​

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Learn about different types of commercial real estate loans.
  • Identify a company’s net operating income or cash flow.
  • Analyze the project and proposed loan.
  • Identify and define important credit risk considerations for major property groups and specialty properties.
  • Recognize and use lease terminology.
  • Recognize the cash flow and economic consideration of leases.
  • Demonstrate how to review leases on commercial properties.
  • Assess various borrowing structures.
  • Identify issues involving owner occupied lending.
  • Identify the key types of construction projects and loans.
  • Explore underwriting and administrator issues with construction projects and loans.

Audience: Commercial lenders and credit analysts who are not real estate specialists but who need to know more about assessing real estate risk.

Series 1: Types of CRE Loans, Risk Areas and Performance Drivers

An overview of the different types of CRE loans and the importance of providing the right loan for both the borrower and the bank. The series will also help identify the risk areas in CRE lending and help analyze the drivers of CRE performance.   

Courses include:
    CRE-LDP 1.1 – Types of CRE Loans
    CRE-LDP 1.2 – Risk Areas and Drivers of CRE Performance

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Evaluate the differences between commercial and industrial (C&I) and CRE loan categories
  • Identify how C&I, CRE, and owner-occupied loans fit into the credit decision framework
  • Define and describe the characteristics and purposes of the four primary types of CRE loans
  • Identify the loan’s purpose and related use of funds, type of property and collateral, and ultimate repayment source
  • Explain repayment source co-dependence
  • Identify the risk area of CRE lending
  • Analyze the drivers of CRE performance
  • Identify the drivers of CRE loan performance and apply the CRE Drivers of Loan Performance checklist to an actual loan
  • Identify the three primary areas of loan performance risk (operational, market, and credit risk)
  • Identify which of the three primary areas of risk the bank can influence and steps lenders can take to influence those risks

Series 2: The CRE Underwriting Process

Learn how to identify a company’s net operating income (NOI) or cash flow, and analyze the project and proposed loan. Capitalization rates and valuation basics are also introduced, as well as the appraisal process and identifying best practices regarding environmental assessments.    

Courses include:
    CRE-LDP 2.1 – Underwriting Basics
    CRE-LDP 2.2 – Collateral Valuation Considerations

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the components of CRE quantitative analysis, including gross lease income, vacancy, operating expenses, and net operating income (NOI)
  • Identify underwriting guidelines for your own bank
  • Construct a basic income property cash flow using the components of CRE analysis
  • Evaluate loan repayment sources using the DSC ratio, capitalization rates and valuation, and the LTV ratio
  • Conduct a stress test of DSC for potentially lower cash flow and higher interest rates and of LTV for potentially higher CAP rates.
  • Explore changes in property variables on an individual basis using sensitivity analysis
  • Explain the role and function of capitalization rates
  • Compare and contrast the direct capitalization valuation approach with the discounted cash flow approach
  • Identify the key steps in ordering and reviewing appraisals
  • Explain the rules and regulations regarding appraisals that lenders must follow
  • Define and describe the types of CRE appraisals and their components
  • Identify the key steps and issues involved in ordering and reviewing environmental assessments
  • Describe the rules and guidelines for Phase I environmental reports
  • Identify and describe the types of environmental risk management tools

Series 3: Financing Different Types of Commercial Properties 

Know the important credit risk considerations for major property groups and special properties, and be able to identify and compare components used in reporting statements for various income properties, estimate rental income using various approaches and create pro forma operating statements.

Courses include:
    CRE-LDP 3.1 – Understanding the Various Property Types
    CRE-LDP 3.2 – Understanding Property Cash Flows

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the key characteristics of and differences between the major types of commercial properties
  • Identify the key terminology and underwriting considerations for each property type
  • Identify the key characteristics of and differences among specialized properties
  • Identify the key terminology, underwriting considerations, and documentation for each property type
  • Identify and compare income and expense components for different types of commercial property
  • Identify and compare operating statement formats that use varying methods of calculating and reporting on real estate projected income
  • Calculate: NOI from Schedule E tax returns, monthly rent payment from percentage rents and CAMs, and effective rents from differing scenarios
  • Calculate income property pro forma cash flow on as-is and as-stabilized basis from qualitative and quantitative information sources

Series 4: Understanding and Evaluating Leases, Appraisals and Environmental Assessments

 Recognize and use lease terminology and recognize the cash flow and economic considerations of leases.  Learn how to review commercial property leases, assess the role and scope of an appraisal and identify issues in reviewing appraisals. The final section of this Series 4 will cover environmental assessments.   

Courses include:
    CRE-LDP 4.1 – Understanding and Analyzing Leases
    CRE-LDP 4.2 – Understanding and Evaluating Appraisals
    CRE-LDP 4.3 – Understanding and Evaluating Environmental Assessments

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify economic, legal, and business issues in commercial property leases including key documents, lease terms, and objectives or purposes.
  • Describe the role of an appraisal in the loan underwriting process, its uses, and its limitations
  • Identify the key considerations in defining the appraisal problem and determining the scope of work
  • Determine how valuation concepts are developed and executed in a sample appraisal
  • Identify key areas of an appraisal to evaluate in the review process and common errors to watch for
  • Describe the role of an environmental assessment in the loan underwriting process, its uses, and its limitations.
  • Describe potential environmental risks and ways to mitigate those risks.
  • Identify key considerations in defining the required level of due diligence.
  • Evaluate and interpret the findings of a Phase I environmental report.

Series 5: Loan Structure and Documentation Considerations

 Topics in how to assess various borrowing structures, identify issues involving owner occupied lending, determine loan documentation, as well as due diligence considerations and how to identify key components of CRE Loan structure.

Courses include:
    CRE-LDP 5.1 – Borrowing Structures and Owner-Occupied Properties
    CRE-LDP 5.2 – Documentation, Due Diligence, and Loan Structure

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the strategic advantages and disadvantages of various forms of business ownership
  • Identify the primary tax returns used for each borrowing entity and the sections that provide valuable financial information for loan underwriting
  • Identify the ways cash moves among business entities
  • Identify the decision-making process for an owner-occupant when either purchasing or leasing a building
  • Identify repayment sources, their hierarchy, and their co-dependence for owner-occupied loans
  • Determine how to structure owner-occupant loans to address unique attributes such as holding company structure, property condition, and valuation issues
  • Identify key elements in the SBA 504 program to finance owner-occupied real estate
  • Identify the key instruments necessary to document a loan transaction and perfect a lien on collateral
  • Identify organizational documents required for various entity forms and execution requirements
  • Recognize key elements of due diligence to be submitted and reviewed prior to closing
  • Evaluate and interpret the findings of a title policy
  • Identify key components of CRE loan structure
  • Demonstrate the use of loan covenants and other techniques to protect property cash flow and property value
  • Identify how permanent market pricing and loan structure differs from and influences the traditional bank market

Series 6: Construction Lending

An explanation of the types of construction loans, construction lending underwriting and administration issues, and how to recognize the different elements of the construction lending process. Learn the key elements for successful completion of construction projects, and also the special issues involved with homebuilders and subdivision developers.

Courses include:
    CRE-LDP 6.1 – Types of Construction Projects and Related Risks
    CRE-LDP 6.2 – The Construction Process, Liens, and Project Completion
    CRE-LDP 6.3 – Homebuilders and Subdivision Developers

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the six general types of construction loans
  • Identify the additional risks, considerations, and review needed with construction loans
  • Explain the steps in determining the proper administration of a construction loan based on approval conditions, the commitment letter, and loan policies and procedures
  • Identify key concerns in reviewing construction contracts, budgets, and site information
  • Calculate the adequacy of a construction loan interest reserve requirement
  • Identify best practices in construction and loan documentation and administration
  • Identify components of construction loan agreements, surety bonds, permits and zoning, and insurance including steps in processing draw requests and analyzing inspection reports
  • Identify key elements for successful completion of the project
  • Identify acceptance by the customer, punch list items, payment of retainage to the contractor, and the certificate of occupancy
  • Recognize various segments in the single-family home markets and their characteristics
  • Identify the key issues for administering or monitoring builder construction lines
  • Build a timeline of the development process and identify developer attributes needed to achieve each step
  • Identify various types of risk inherent in lending to single-family-home developments, risks from both external and internal sources
  • Identify the key issues for monitoring homebuilder and subdivision loans

The Future of Business

The Future of Business training course offers a brief yet complete introduction to business concepts and terminology using a student-centered, practical, and relevant approach. Students learn to navigate through the sometime stormy business environment by stressing important business issues such as customer satisfaction and quality, entrepreneurship, cultural and workplace diversity, ethics, global business, technology, teams, and e-business.

The Lending Decision Process

 This six-part series will give a foundation in the following areas of study: business and industry risk analysis, management assessment, financial accounting, balance sheet and income statement analyses, ratio trend analysis, cash cycle seasonality analysis, borrowing causes and repayment source assessment, cash flow analysis and using financial projections.

Course List

The courses included in The Lending Decision Process Curriculum are:

  • Series 1: Industry, Management, and Economic Influences
  • Series 2: Interpreting Quality of Financial Reports and Accounts
  • Series 3: Analyzing the Company’s Financial Performance and Condition
  • Series 4: The Cash Cycle, Seasonality and Discovering Borrowing Causes and Repayment Sources
  • Series 5: Analyzing Cash Flow Statements to Measure Long-Term Repayment Ability
  • Series 6: Using Financial Projections to Fine Tune the Credit Analysis

There are 17 courses included in the complete Lending Decision Process series. Approximate time to complete all courses and modules in the curriculum is between 35 to 50 hours.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Interpret repayment risks related to industry, economic, market and management factors
  • Interpret risks stemming from the quality of financial reports and underlying financial accounts.
  • Interpret repayment risks suggested by the company’s historical financial performance and financial condition, applying balance sheet and income statement measures to analyze liquidity, leverage, profitability, financial productivity, and efficiency.
  • Interpret repayment risks related to a company’s cash cycle and seasonal characteristics, interpreting both long- and short-term borrowing causes and related repayment sources.
  • Analyze cash flow statements and traditional debt service coverage measures to interpret cash flow repayment risks.
  • Interpret future ability to repay debt by constructing and analyzing financial projections, evaluating margins of protection in business, industry or management risks

Audience: Loan trainees, credit analysts, and anyone with commercial lending authority.

Series 1: Industry, Management, and Economic Influences

 How to interpret repayment risks related to industry, economic, market and management influences.  

Courses include:
    LDP 1.1 – Understanding the Customer’s Operating Environment
    LDP 1.2 – Understanding the Customer’s Business and Management

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze the competitive forces in an industry
  • Determine key success factors in the company’s industry
  • Explain the stages of the general business cycle and the impact economic cycles and conditions can have on different businesses
  • Describe the financial behavior of industries, products and companies throughout their life cycles
  • Connect a company’s industry, business and product life cycles to their related financing needs
  • Prepare a company overview of its products and services, customers, suppliers, facilities, management, ownership and company history
  • Appraise the company’s likelihood of success, considering prior risk mitigation, competitive advantages, management qualifications and effectiveness of business strategies
  • Appraise the depth and breadth of management skill, experience and organization

Series 2: Interpreting Quality of Financial Reports and Accounts

How to interpret risks stemming from the quality of financial reports and underlying financial accounts.  

Courses include:
    LDP 2.1 – Financial Statements Overview
    LDP 2.2 – Balance Sheet and Income Statement Overview

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze the reliability of accountant prepared financial statements.
  • Compare and contrast the differences among cash, modified-cash, and tax-basis accounting methods.
  • Interpret repayment risks stemming from identified financial reporting issues.
  • Assess the implication of estimates permitted by GAAP.
  • Identify the characteristics of a company’s assets, liabilities, and net worth accounts.
  • Determine the integrity of a company’s reported financial condition based on a review of both on- and off-balance sheet accounts.
  • Identify the characteristics of a company’s income and expense accounts.
  • Analyze the quality of a company’s earnings, the consistency and authenticity of its income and expense accounts, and the sustainability of revenues.

Series 3: Analyzing the Company’s Financial Performance and Financial Condition

 Interpreting repayment risks suggested by the company’s historical financial performance and financial condition.

Courses include:
    LDP 3.1 – Spreading Financial Statements
    LDP 3.2 – Analyzing the Balance Sheet
    LDP 3.3 – Analyzing the Income Statement
    LDP 3.4 – Analyzing Combined Balance Sheets and Income Statements

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Apply financial statement spreading techniques to reclassify accounts and provide details needed to prepare financial statements for credit analysis
  • Convert financial statements to a format that expresses accounts as percentages of total sales of or total assets
  • Compute a company’s liquidity using various ratios
  • Analyze a company’s ability to meet its short- term obligations
  • Determine how a company’s industry sector influences it financial statement characteristics
  • Compute a company’s leverage using various ratios
  • Analyze a company’s ability to meet its long-term obligations
  • Determine how a company’s industry sector influences it financial statement characteristics
  • Calculate and analyze a company’s profit margins
  • Perform a trend analysis on a company’s profitability
  • Compare a company’s profitability with industry composites
  • Compute and analyze a company’s productivity ratios
  • Compare a company’s productivity trends with industry composites
  • Compute and analyze a company’s efficiency ratios
  • Compare a company’s efficiency trends with industry composites

Series 4: The Cash Cycle, Seasonality and Discovering Borrowing Causes and Repayment Sources

 Examining a company’s cash cycle and seasonal characteristics. Learn to interpret both short- and long-term borrowing causes and repayment sources. 

Courses include:
    LDP 4.1 – Business Cash Cycles
    LDP 4.2 – Seasonality
    LDP 4.3 – Discovering Borrowing Causes and Repayment Sources

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify and measure cash cycles using days’ sales in receivables and days’ COGS in inventory and accounts payable.
  • Identify the benefits and limitations of cash cycle analysis
  • Determine variations in cash cycles by type of business
  • Determine the effects of seasonality of business operations on the cash cycle.
  • Interpret budgets of cash receipts and disbursements to estimate the amount and duration of seasonal borrowing needs.
  • Identify the benefits and limitations of analyzing interim financial statements.
  • Differentiate between seasonal and permanent asset and liability levels.
  • Identify borrowing causes including sales growth, change in asset efficiency, change in trade credit, fixed asset expenditures, and change in net worth
  • Determine repayment sources that are appropriate matches to each borrowing cause

Series 5: Analyzing Cash Flow Statements to Measure Long-Term Repayment Ability

 Analyzing cash flow statements to distinguish between profit and cash flow. How to use cash flow statements and traditional debt service coverage measures to interpret cash flow repayment risks is covered.

Courses include:
    LDP 5.1 – Cash Flow Statements and Their Formats
    LDP 5.2 – Analyzing Cash Flow
    LDP 5.3 – Debt Service Coverage

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the three Cash Flow Statement formats in order to understand how the company generates and uses cash flow.
  • Define the three types of cash flow to determine how business events are reflected on the Cash Flow Statement.
  • Compare accrual and cash-based financial statements in order to differentiate between cash and non-cash events.
  • Convert an accrual based statement to a cash-basis presentation to isolate cash generation or contraction
  • Determine cash flow to repay debt by answering four key questions
  • Evaluate cash flow quality using three tests
  • Rank cash flow quality based on the ability to repay debt
  • Identify and predict the demands on cash that might compromise loan repayment
  • Calculate and interpret profit-based debt service coverage ratios
  • Identify the benefits and limitations of profit-based debt service coverage ratios
  • Calculate and interpret UCA cash flow-based debt service coverage ratios
  • Outline the benefits and limitations of UCA cash flow-based debt service coverage

Series 6: Using Financial Projections to Fine Tune the Credit Analysis

 Constructing and analyzing financial projections to interpret future ability to repay debt, identify the most appropriate type of loan, and to evaluate margins of protection in the event of changes in business, industry or management risks. 

Courses include:
    LDP 6.1 – Using Pro Forma Balance Sheets to Interpret Short Term Repayment Ability
    LDP 6.2 – Preparing and Interpreting Annual Financial Projections
    LDP 6.3 – Using Projections to Help Determine Appropriate Loan Type

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the benefits of using financial projections in a credit analysis
  • Prepare a pro forma monthly balance sheet to evaluate peak borrowing needs based on a company’s cash budget and projected monthly income statements
  • Prepare an annual financial projection
  • Interpret the ability to repay debt given assumptions about cash flow drivers and other variables
  • Interpret loan types based on projected borrowing needs and repayment sources
  • Determine an appropriate repayment schedule for long-term loans

The Panama Papers: Lesson Learned and Implications Dealing with Professional Service Providers & Overview of CDD Rule

In the wake of “Panama Papers”, the White House announced certain efforts seeking regulatory reform aimed at financial transparency and fighting money laundering, corruption and tax evasion. On May 5, 2016, the White House announced several important steps to combat money laundering, corruption, and tax evasion, and called upon Congress to take additional action to address these critical issues.

Join now for a seminar which will focus on some lessons learned in the wake of the panama papers as well as an overview of the Final Treasury Regulations on “Customer Due Diligence” (CDD) that enhance transparency by requiring financial instructions to know and keep records on who actually owns the companies that use their services. As will be discussed during this presentation, on May 11, 2016, the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) published a final rule requiring financial institutions to know and verify the identities of the natural persons (also known as beneficial owners) Who own, control, and profit from companies when those companies open accounts.

Learn how U.S. financial institutions will need to review, revise and enhance their existing BSA/AML policies and procedures, as well as the existing capabilities of their systems and monitoring controls, to address the requirements imposed by the CDD Rule in the wake of the Panama Papers.

The Power of Facebook

The place to find and meet clients and prospects is online. Learn how you can leverage the 1.7 billion users on Facebook to expand your reach and grow your bank’s business.

Modules:

  • Stand Out: Create Your Account
  • Share It: Earn Attention
  • Reach Out: Grow Your Audience
  • Customize: Promote Engagement
  • Analyze: Increase Your Impact

What You’ll Learn

  • Explain the best practices for creating accounts and content
  • Identify ways to connect with prospects and customers
  • Identify strategies to launch Facebook campaigns, extend your reach, and build brand loyalty
  • Identify the types of tools that Facebook offers to engage your audience
  • Track effectiveness and success measures

Audience: Any bank employee who uses Facebook to promote the bank’s brand, products, and services.

The S.A.F.E. Act – Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act

Explains the purpose of the S.A.F.E. Act and the core elements of the “mortgage loan originator” position. Provides a working knowledge of what activities define a mortgage loan originator, the registration requirements, and the use of the MLO unique identifier.

NOTE: This course is written specifically for the purpose of training front-line Mortgage Loan Originators (MLOs) who are employed​​​ by financial institutions covered by the provisions of the S.A.F.E. Act. It does not cover the specific requirements for MLOs who must be state licensed and registered.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the goals and requirements of the S.A.F.E. Act
  • Determine the MLO’s role, registration of, and basic requirements for an MLO

Audience: Bank MLOs who need a very basic knowledge of the S.A.F.E. Act requirements. Branch employees who are performing some loan-related functions and who need to know when or if they may need to be registered.

The OFAC Landscape under the New Administration

This seminar will explore the impact to financial institutions in connection with the growing concern and challenges associated with compliance with the OFAC sanctions. Among others, this seminar will cover the following:

  • Why must a financial institution focus on OFAC;
    • General OFAC compliance obligations and baseline;
    • Determining whether entities that are owned or controlled by blocked persons are themselves blocked persons;
    • Event-driven enhanced due diligence and look-back reviews;
    • Common mistakes and lessons learned; and
    • Handling penalties and voluntary self-disclosures.

In addition to the foregoing, this seminar will cover recent changes with respect to the Cuba and Iran sanctions. Among others, OFAC has administered and enforced a series of sanctions against Cuba for decades, and just in the past two (2) years, these sanctions have been reduced, allowing more transactions to be conducted. What caused these changes? What do these changes mean? What is now permissible for financial institutions and other persons that are subject to OFAC regulations? What remains in the “danger zone”? What may change, if any, under the new Administration with respect to the Cuba and Iran sanctions?

Audience: Bank personnel who have deposit or lending responsibilities.

Title Insurance Basics for Bankers

Title Insurance Bankers, particularly those involved in real estate lending, are familiar with the need to obtain a title insurance policy insuring the bank’s mortgage. This half day seminar explains the title insurance product in detail and will give bankers a more thorough understanding of why bank policy typically requires it. Starting with a discussion of basic real estate law concepts, the course will move to a detailed look at the title insurance process including the title search, the title commitment and the final title insurance policy. The seminar will explore the difference between an ownership and encumbrance search and a title commitment, how to review a title commitment, how to review a final title policy, and how title policies are priced in Florida. The course concludes with a look at the title claims process including how to make a claim under a policy and what is or is not covered under a typical title policy.

TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures

This course explains the background and purpose of the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rules. This course provides an overview of the Loan Estimate (LE) and Closing Disclosure (CD) and the timing requirements. This course emphasizes factors to comply with TRID rules regarding restrictions on fees, misaligned mortgage rules, and timing requirements.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of the new TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure rules and identify the types of transactions that are covered under the TRID rules and which are not covered
  • Explain the timing requirements for providing the Loan Estimate (LE) and when a revised LE is required and when it is allowed
  • Recognize the tolerance variations for three categories of fees
  • Explain the timing requirements for providing the Closing Disclosure (CD) and when a revised CD is required and when it is allowed
  • Identify important considerations for complying with TRID rules

Audience: Any branch staff who discuss mortgage products with consumers or take mortgage loan applications, including loan originators, mortgage loan originators, loan processors, mortgage operations staff and loan servicers.

The Mortgage Lending Business

This course provides an overview of the mortgage lending business, including mortgage banker, broker, and lender business models; the role of government and agencies like Federal Housing Administration and the Veteran’s Administration programs; other key players like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; important real estate laws; and the basics of real estate investing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain how property is transferred from one owner to another, and the legal implications of transfer of property
  • Describe the basic principles involved in real estate investment and finance, including the business of construction and development lending
  • Describe the process of mortgage origination, processing, underwriting, closing, and servicing, including the federal laws that apply
  • Explain the various functions and responsibilities of mortgage origination and loan servicing departments
  • Identify government and government-sponsored agencies that interact to further home ownership

Audience: Financial service professionals who want a broad overview of mortgage lending, including those who intend to pursue a career in mortgage lending (business development, underwriting, processing) or those individuals who recently joined a mortgage lending department.

Trade Finance and Letters of Credit

What you will learn:
•Trade Alternatives
•What letters of Credit are and are not
•What Credits do and what credits do not
•Contracts
•Compliance Risks Considerations
•Possible participants in a Letter of Credit Transaction
•Types of Letters of Credit
•Basic Letter of Credit Transaction: Domestic Letter of Credit, Import Letter of Credit, Export Letter of Credit, Incoterms or Trade Terms
•Amendments
•Commercial Documents/Discrepancies in the documents presented
•Payment Methods and or Financing drawings under Letters of Credit
•Financing the beneficiary: Transfers, Without Substitution of Invoices, With Substitution of Invoices, Back to Back Credits, Assignment of proceeds, Red Claude Credits, Advances, Anticipatory Drawings
•Revolving Credits
•Standby Letters of Credit
•Why Banks Handle Letters of Credit
•Samples

Audience: loan officers, operations officers, and credit administration personnel

Truth in Saving Act (Reg DD)

Provides consistency in the way rates and other information about consumer-held deposit accounts is provided. The regulation imposes requirements on how and when consumer deposit account terms, including fees and rate information, are disclosed in advertisements, account opening documents, periodic statements, and change-in-term notices.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the background and purpose of the Truth in Savings Act
  • Differentiate between a general inquiry and a specific request
  • Explain how to quote interest rates
  • Identify the requirements for signs, notices, and advertising for deposit products
  • Describe the Truth in Savings Act disclosures provided for accounts
  • Describe the disclosure requirements when presenting periodic statements to customers​

Audience: Bank personnel who are responsible for opening new accounts, explaining fees and charges and quoting rates to clients.

Trust Basics

This course provides you with an overview of the trust department, including how it fits into the bank’s over-all operations, the services it provides, and generally how those services are delivered.

Audience: Non-trust bank personnel and those who have recently come into the trust department in support positions, entry-level personal, employee benefit, and corporate trust officers.

Trust Investments

This course focuses on the theory and practice of trust department investment services.

Audience: Trust department personnel, including officer trainees, paralegals, administrative assistants, and retail bank personnel.

Trust Operations

Trust Operations provides an overview of a trust institution’s operations, the products and services associated with the operations of a trust institution, and how trust operations professionals can help their associates and customers both potential and existing. Presentations provide the definitive concepts and direction to help participants make decisions relative to reporting systems, provide accounting tactics, and best report to the regulatory agencies.

Audience: Entry-level trust personnel (personal, corporate, and employee benefit), both officer and non-officer level.

Types of Insurance

Describes homeowners insurance, homeowners liability, and homeowners medical payment coverages. Covers floaters and endorsements and describes the purpose of umbrella policies, and the features of comprehensive personal liability policies. Explains who needs business liability policies, and describes the elements of professional liability policies. Explores the options available in employer-provided medical insurance, and explains the government-provided medical insurance plans. Explains how to identify individuals that should consider critical illness insurance and describes providers of disability income insurance coverage, and explains the different policy riders. Discusses the features of long-term care insurance and tax-qualified LTC policies and describes factors that are included when assessing risk in property insurance needs and liability, medical, and disability insurance coverages.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the features of homeowners insurance
  • Explain the various types of liability insurance
  • Describe the medical insurance options available to clients
  • Identify the providers and optional riders offered with disability income insurance
  • Explain long term care insurance and the policies recommended
  • Assess the type and amount of insurance necessary to manage client risk

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Understanding Bank Products

Understanding Bank Products is designed to give students an overview of the products and services offered by banks to meet the needs of consumers and small businesses. Gaining knowledge in the range of products offered by a bank will enable students to recognize when a client has a need and then suggest the appropriate product to meet that need. The bank product information contained in this course is presented in broad strokes and describes the products from the perspective of clients and their needs. Students also have the opportunity to learn beyond the scope of the course with activities they perform on their own.

Audience: The course is designed for branch client-contact personnel with at least six months experience. Those who would benefit most include tellers, new accounts representatives, personal bankers, platform assistants, and branch manager trainees.

Understanding Business Borrowers

 Learn how to identify and understand business industries and types—and why they borrow money. An introduced to the basic concepts of business financial accounting and entity structures is also covered.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

The courses included in Understanding Business Borrowers and their objectives are listed below:

Business Sectors and Operating Cycle

  • Explain the operating cycles of various business industries
  • Analyze the financial data and evaluate the risks of the different industries

Why Businesses Borrow

  • Explain how a firm’s cash flow cycle can affect debt requirements and repayment sources
  • Identify the reasons businesses need to borrow
  • Identify the various borrowing arrangements used to structure a business loan
  • Describe the way alternative lending sources compete with or complement community banks

Business Legal Structures and Life Cycles

  • Define the basic types of legal structures available to a business
  • Describe the general characteristics of the four stages in the business life cycles

Introduction to Business Financial Statements

  • Describe the financial statement analysis process
  • Describe basic guidelines for preparing a spreadsheet and analyzing the data
  • Identify and evaluate a borrower’s financial strengths, weaknesses, and uncertainties
  • Explain the different types of financial statement preparation
  • Describe the other components associated with financial analysis

How Business Financial Statements are Constructed (Accounting Refresher)

  • Compare and contrast the cash method and accrual method of accounting
  • Construct a balance sheet and income statement on the accrual basis for an example business

​Audience: Commercial and/or Business bankers and Credit Analysts

Understanding Commercial Loan Documentation

Commercial Loan Documentation is a single day seminar that explores in detail the various documents used in a variety of commercial loan transactions. Lenders, credit officers, paralenders, document preparation specialists, loan booking specialists and other bankers involved in the lending process will benefit from the thorough discussion of what each document does and why it is used in a loan transaction. While the emphasis is on commercial loans, those involved in residential lending will also benefit as many of the documents and concepts discussed are applicable to both types of loan transactions.

Topics:

  • Understanding borrowing entities (corporations, LLCs, partnerships, etc.)
  • Documents needed to verify authority of borrowing entities
  • Evidence of indebtedness (term notes, revolving line of credit notes, etc.)
  • Mortgages (including modifications, mortgage spreaders, future advances)
  • Assignments of rents
  • Equipment financing (security agreements, UCC-1 forms, UCC-3 forms)
  • Specialized collateral (titled vehicles, airplanes, life insurance policies, investment securities)
  • Letters of Credit
  • Cross defaults and cross collateralizations
  • Loan renewals and loan modifications
  • Documents applicable to construction loans

This seminar is taught by a Florida attorney with more than 25 years of experience in representing banks and other lenders both in closing and in collecting loans.

Audience: Anyone interested in Commercial Loan Documentation

Understanding Financial Planning

This course enables participants to help their customer plan for financial growth. It covers how to analyze a customer’s financial needs, to ask questions that elicit information about a customer’s financial situation, and how to match products and services to a customer’s financial situation a various life stages.

Audience: Staff who sell or refer products and services.

Understanding Transfer Tax

Identifies the types of transactions that may be considered gifts and describes the conditions that cause gift taxation. Describes the requirements that must be met for a disclaimer to qualify for exemption from federal gift tax, and the exclusions available to clients to minimize or avoid taxes. Explains the impact of the unified tax system and how to calculate the amount subject to the gift tax.

Learning Obj​​​​ectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Define what a gift is for tax purposes
  • Describe the benefits of disclaimers and exclusions for your clients
  • Explain your role in meeting client expectations
  • Describe the methods and costs of transferring property
  • Identify gift tax considerations

Audience​​​: Trust officers with at least three years of personal trust experience who need a deeper understanding of technical trust concepts and how solutions work when applied to client needs.

Understanding Your Construction Borrower

This ABA course provides an overview of the construction process that will help you better evaluate and serve your construction borrower. It examines the overall construction process and the documents typically required for loan approval. Also included is an overview of project types and the idiosyncrasies pertaining to them. Specific topics include construction document reviews, construction budgets, soils reports, municipal approvals, loan administration and project closing. Discussions include the loan closing, payment disbursements and title work.

Audience: Entry-level commercial lenders and small business bankers serving clients with construction needs, managers and loan officers of construction lending groups, and other bank personnel, such as analysts and loan administrators involved with construction loans.

Unfair, Deceptive, or Abusive Acts or Practices (UDAAP) for Compliance Professionals

 Provides a definition of an unfair act or practice, and explores cases of unfair and deceptive credit under UDAAP and unfair debt collection under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Explains the enforcement actions used by the CFPB and proactive steps to prevent UDAAP claims.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the background of UDAAP
  • Recognize unfair, deceptive, and abusive acts or practices
  • Identify the elements that make a practice unfair, deceptive, or abusive
  • Identify proactive steps that you can take to avoid UDAAP violations
  • Explain how you can help your bank avoid UDAAP claims

Audience: Compliance professionals including compliance managers, officers, and other compliance team members whose primary role is within the compliance function at their financial institution; bank examiners, bank regulators, auditors and lending compliance professionals.

Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA)

Focuses on steps to assess the risk of unlawful Internet gambling transactions conducted through a commercial loan or deposit account. Outlines requirements associated with blocking restricted transactions conducted with debit and credit cards, providing notice to commercial account holders, and crafting an action plan for banks that discover UIGEA violations.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe key points of a bank’s policy related to new account screening for unlawful Internet gambling
  • Explain what should be included in a bank’s card transaction policy to block unlawful transactions made via credit and debit cards
  • Explain the methods used to communicate restricted transactions to customers under the commercial account policy
  • Describe options a bank may implement as part of a remedial action policy when unlawful transactions are discovered​

Audience: All Frontline Compliance employees who open commercial accounts (deposit or loan) or who answer customer questions concerning debit or credit card transactions.

Vendor Risk Management

An overview of the risk considerations associated with the selection, engagement, oversight and termination of vendors by a bank, and a perspective on the current regulatory expectations.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Know why financial institutions use third parties and the typical services provided
  • Understand typical risk areas and the regulatory content
  • Outline the methodology for risk categorization
  • Describe the stages in the vendor relationship life cycle
  • Identify documentation and record keeping requirements

Audience: Risk managers and business line managers who interact with third-party vendors and need to recognize the potential risks within the legal agreements and the services they provide, especially in situations where an entire bank function is outsourced, multiple bank functions are consolidated to a single vendor, the vendor subcontracts and/or the vendor works directly with the bank’s customers.

Wills, Trusts, and Estate Administration

A trusted resource in paralegal education for more than three decades, WILLS, TRUSTS, AND ESTATE ADMINISTRATION, introduces the basics of estate planning and bequeathing property through wills and trusts, along with the laws and procedures involved, including the Uniform Probate Code. In addition to substantive probate law, the course covers procedural law, tax implications, ethical considerations, and the roles paralegals and other professionals play in the process. The text’s approach helps students hone their critical thinking skills; the writing is clear and free of confusing legalese. This course is packed with student-friendly case summaries, state-specific examples, and detailed documents and exhibits.

Writing in the Workforce

This workshop sharpens essential skills to write effective correspondence.